Dec 05, 2022  
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order.

Standard information for each course includes the number, title, and credits (sometimes called credit hours or semester hours). For some courses, you will find information on the hours of class, laboratory, or studio for which the course is scheduled in each week of a regular semester; these weekly hours are expanded during summer sessions. Fees for courses are assessed on the basis of credits and other factors.

The course-numbering system generally suggests levels of difficulty and appropriateness. Courses at the 100 and 200 levels comprise introductory offerings and those are most commonly taken by freshmen and sophomores. Courses at the 300 and 400 levels are primarily for juniors and seniors. In some Purdue programs, undergraduates take courses at the 500 level, but generally courses numbered 500 and above are for graduate students.

Preparation for courses is indicated as follows:

P: indicates a prerequisite that must precede your enrollment in the course described. You may find one or more specific course numbers, the number of credits you should already have in a subject, a placement-test level, or other conditions.

C: indicates a corequisite that must be taken no later than the same semester in which you take the course described.

R: indicates a recommendation concerning conditions to be met for enrollment in the course.

When no subject code is shown for prerequisites, corequisites, and recommended courses, they are in the same subject area as the course being described. If you lack a prerequisite or corequisite, or if you wish to take a course numbered at a higher level than your present status, you should seek the department’s or instructor’s consent to enroll in the course.

V.T. means Variable Title and is shown for courses for which the title may be changed to specify the topic or other special focus of each offering.

Purdue University Fort Wayne reserves the right to add, withdraw, or change courses without notice.

 

 
  
  •  

    HIST 32701 - Modern France And The French Empire


    This course provides an introduction to the history of France and its empire over the course of the last 150 years.  It covers the most important political events that impacted France and her colonies since the end of the nineteenth century, as well as considering social, cultural, and intellectual movements that influenced the course of French and imperial history.  The course considers questions of identity, defining ‘Frenchness,’ over a contested period, and questioning what it meant to be a member of the greater French empire.  It examines what France meant to various groups and considers ideas of belonging and the nation, studying inclusion and exclusion, and the ramifications of maintaining and living in a global empire.  The course studies the complex relationship between colonized and colonizer from the viewpoints of both sides, considering both the political and emotional legacies of colonialism.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HIST 33101 - African History From Ancient Times To Empires And City States


    Origins and groupings of peoples of Africa; political, social, and economic evolution to 1750; Africa’s contacts with ancient world, trans-Sahara and Indian Ocean trades, growth of states and empires, spread of Islam.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by College of Science for the nonwestern cultural studies requirement.
    Subject Area
    [OW] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 33201 - African History From Colonial Rule To Independence


    1750 to present. Slave trade, European imperialism; impact of Islam and Christianity, new state formations, reassertion of African culture and identity.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by College of Science for the Cultural Studies (Non-Western Culture) requirement.
    Subject Area
    [OW] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 33502 - American History Through Music


    This course uses developments within the American music industry to trace the larger development in United States history during the twentieth century. Turn-of-the-century ragtime becomes a lens through which to understand the cultural impact of the modern industrial economy. Surf music is a microcosm of post-war suburbanization. Motown reveals tensions between the business and civil rights communities. Led Zeppelin is treated as part of the fantastic escapism of the malaise of the 1970s. This is not a music history class per se, but rather a class that uses music to study history.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HIST 33503 - Topics In Non-Western History


    Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in non-Western, Russian, and Latin American history from the perspective of the arts and humanities. Topics will vary.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit with different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours.
    Approved by College of Science for the Cultural Studies (Non-Western Culture) requirement.
    Subject Area
    [OW] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 33604 - France In World War I And World War II


    This class considers the history of French society, culture, and politics through participation in the First and Second World Wars. While WWI and WWII affected millions of people around the globe, France held a unique position in that in addition to the fighting, French civilians lived under harsh occupation in both world wars.  This course explores the French experiences during the two world wars, considering the war experience from diverse perspectives, including those of soldiers, civilians, men, women, collaborators, resisters, and France’s imperial subjects.  While the class is centered on the two world wars, it is not a military history course; rather, the course focuses on society and culture and how the war experiences shaped France, the French Empire, and its people.  Along with the war experience, students will consider the shifting view of war as it was being anticipated, fought, and remembered.

    Cr 3.
    Notes
    Course will typically be offered online.
  
  •  

    HIST 34101 - Latin America: Conquest And Empire


    Geographical, Indian, Spanish, Portuguese, and African backgrounds; discovery and conquest; settlement and expansion; political, economic, social, cultural, and religious institutions; trans-European struggle for hemispheric dominance; wars of independence; 1492-1825. 

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HIST 34201 - Latin America: Evolution And Revolution


    Hispanic America since independence, with emphasis on common problems of nation building in multi-racial former colonial societies; latifundia; dependency relationships; impact of industrialization; the conservative and revolutionary responses; 1810- present.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by College of Science for the nonwestern culture studies requirement.
    Eligible for graduate credit.
    Subject Area
    [OW] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 34501 - American Diplomatic History I


    American diplomacy from 1775 to 1823; diplomacy of American continental expansion to 1898. America as a world power. Involvement in Far Eastern affairs after 1898, diplomacy of World Wars I and II, developments to present.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Eligible for graduate credit.
    Subject Area
    [US] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
    Dual Level Course
    Undergraduate-Graduate
  
  •  

    HIST 34502 - History Of Espionage: Spies, Intelligence, And Intelligence Agencies In An International Context


    The course examines the development of espionage and intelligence agencies in an international context.  The evolution of spying will be studied alongside major historical developments such as the growth of the state, the rise of public opinion, and the appearance of the 20th century’s catastrophic international conflicts, the First World War, the Second World War and the Cold War.  Through the study of espionage and intelligence agencies we will ask and try to answer questions about the role of knowledge and of secrecy in construction and maintenance of the modern state.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HIST 34601 - Modern Mexico


    Places contemporary Mexico in historical perspective, focusing on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics include nineteenth century social and political movements, the causes and consequences of the 1910 revolution, the formation of Mexico’s political system, problems of economic growth, and the changing patterns of gender, class, and ethnicity in Mexican society.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by College of Science for the Cultural Studies (Non-Western Culture) requirement.
    Subject Area
    [OW] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 35002 - History Of American Medicine


    This course examines the major developments in the history of American medicine from the colonial era through the twentieth century.  It explores the changing meaning of “health” through the years and the political, economic, social, and cultural developments that have helped create America’s modern health care industry.  Particular attention is paid to the evolving role of the doctor and the development of the medical profession during the nineteenth century, as well as the role of commercialized health care and the rise of the pharmaceutical industry in the twentieth century. 

    Preparation for Course
    This class is designed with the non-medical student in mind, so while a general knowledge of U. S. history will be useful, knowledge of medicine is not a prerequisite.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HIST 35101 - The United States In World War II


    Examination of U.S. effect on the outcome of World War II and change in America caused by the war. Major topics: the process of U.S. involvement, strategies of the major land and sea campaigns, relations within the Grand Alliance, development of the A-bomb, and the origins of the Cold War.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [US] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 35102 - Western Europe In The Early Middle Ages


    Evolution of European civilization from the fall of Rome, development of Christianity and the Germanic invasions; through Charlemagne’s Empire and the subsequent development of feudalism, manorialism, and papacy.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Sophomore class standing or higher.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Eligible for graduate credit.
    Subject Area
    [WE] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 35202 - Western Europe In The High And Later Middle Ages


    Expansion of European culture and institutions: chivalry, Crusades, rise of towns, universities, Gothic architecture, law, revival of central government. Changes in late medieval Europe: famine, plague, Hundred Years’ War, peasant revolt, crime, Inquisition, and heresy.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Eligible for graduate credit.
    Subject Area
    [WE] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 35501 - Europe: Louis XIV To French Revolution


    Absolutism to enlightened despotism; the European state and its authority in fiscal, judicial, and military affairs; sources, content, diffusion of the Enlightenment; agriculture, commerce, and industry in pre-industrial economies; Old Regime France.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Eligible for graduate credit.
    Subject Area
    [WE] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 36001 - Atlantic World, 1400-1900


    This course will examine the political, cultural, economic, and biological history of the Atlantic World from 1400 to 1900. There will be an emphasis on how the development of Europe impacted the peoples and cultures of Africa and the Americas, and how these societies likewise shaped Europe’s development.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [HIUS] History Major - United States, [HIWE] History Major - Western Europe, [HIOW] History Major - World
  
  •  

    HIST 36102 - Europe In The 20th Century I


    Diplomatic, economic, intellectual, military, political, and social developments within Europe from World War I to World War II.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Eligible for graduate credit.
    Subject Area
    [WE] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 37701 - The History Of American Sports


    This course is an exploration of the interplay of social, cultural, economic, and political forces in the formation of an American sporting culture from the colonial era to the present. It examines the ways social class, race, gender, ethnicity, and region have influenced sporting experiences and the place of sport in American society.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HIST 37801 - American Constitutional History


    This course surveys the process of framing, amending, and interpreting the United States Constitution from the 1780s until today. It features a detailed study of the history and context of the Constitutional Convention of 1787.  It also examines the decisions and justices of the Supreme Court from its origins to the present.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HIST 37802 - Germany, 1871 To The Present


    Political/social fault lines of Second German Empire of 1871; imperialism; origins, impacts, and legacies of World War I; achievements/limits of Weimar Republic; rise of Nazis; Nazism in power; World War II and Holocaust; Cold War and division of Germany; politics and culture in the two Germanies, 1949-1990; reunification; contemporary problems.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HIST 38201 - The Sixties


    An intensive examination of the decade that tore apart post-World War II American society, beginning with the confident liberalism that believed the nation could “pay any price” and “bear any burden” to stop Communism abroad and to promote reform at home. Focuses on the internal contradictions and external challenges that destroyed this liberal agenda: civil rights and black power, the New Left, the counterculture, second-wave feminism, the sexual revolution, the Vietnam War, and the globalization of the economy, and finishing with the more conservative order that emerged in the early 1970s to deal with the conflicting realities of limited national power and wealth on the one hand, and rising demands for rights and opportunities on the other.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2-3, Lab 0-1.
    Subject Area
    [US] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 38601 - Greek History


    Political, social, and economic developments in the Greek world from the age of Mycenae and Troy until the Roman conquest (167 B.C.). Greek colonial world, Athens and Sparta, career and legend of Alexander the Great, the Hellenistic age. Archaeology as a source for political and social history.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [WE] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 38801 - Roman History


    Development of the history of the Roman people from legendary origins through the regal period, the Republic, the Early Empire, and the Late Empire, closing with the reign of Justinian (A.D. 527-565).

    Preparation for Course
    P: Sophomore or higher class standing.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Eligible for graduate credit.
    Subject Area
    [WE] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 39002 - Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire


    The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire from the Golden Age of the second century A.D. until the collapse of the Roman power in the West (476 A.D.). and the rise of Islam; Christianity and the fate of classical culture in an age of political, social, and religious transformation; the impact of recent archaeological discoveries on “the fall of Rome” as a historical problem.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HIST 39201 - History Of Islamic Societies To 1500


    Exploration of the development of Islamic civilization from its emergence at the end of Late Antiquity up through the era witnessing the initial stirrings of the great Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal empires at the turn of the sixteenth century. 

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HIST 39301 - Ottoman History


    Political, social, and economic developments in the Ottoman Empire from the rise of its power in Anatolia (1299) to the end of the classical period (1826). Evolution of Ottoman institutions and relations with major European powers.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by College of Science for the nonwestern culture studies requirement.
    Eligible for graduate credit.
    Subject Area
    [OW] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 40201 - Byzantine History And Civilization II


    History of the Byzantine Empire from 867 to 1453; survey of cultural, demographic, and political developments prior to 867; Orthodoxy and the conceptual foundations of state organization; civil and military aristocracy; social and economic conditions; foreign policy: rival states and war, Latin invasion, imperial restoration, and Ottoman conquest; the Byzantine cultural legacy in the East.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [OW] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 41601 - History Of Slavery In The Americas


    Slavery in the New World is explored by comparing its forms in North America and in the Caribbean and South America. Special attention is paid to the mechanisms by which slaves were held in slavery and the adaptation and accommodations that were made by both masters and slaves.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HIST 42501 - Topics In History


    Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope from the perspective of arts and humanities. Topics will vary but will ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Sophomore or higher class standing.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit with different topic for maximum of 9 credit hours.
    Eligible for graduate credit.
  
  •  

    HIST 42601 - History Of Balkans: 1914-Present


    First World War in the Balkans; politics, economics, and societies in the Balkan countries during the 20th century; Balkan unity movements; international events and World War II; rise of socialism in the region; era of cold war and detente; revolutions of ‘80s and ‘90s.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Sophomore or higher class standing.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [OW] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 42800 - Eastern Europe: 1914 - Present


    World War I; the peace settlements in Poland, Czechoslovakia, Austria, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Albania, Greece, Romania, and Turkey. Parliamentary democracy vs. military dictatorship; irredentism; economic transformation; Nazi domination; Munich; Soviet seizure of power. National communism of Tito, Gromulka, Kadar, Ceausescu, Dubcek, and Hoxha. Soviet and Western rivalry in Eastern Europe.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HIST 43200 - 20th Century Latin American Revolutions


    Revolutions, revolutionary movements, rapid social change, and modernization from Battle through Menem. Particular attention to the Mexican, Cuban, Bolivian, Guatemalan, Costa Rican, and Nicaraguan revolutions, to the Peron, Vargas, and Velasco Alvarado administrations and Cold War confrontations.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by College of Science for the Cultural Studies (Non-Western Culture) requirement.
    Eligible for graduate credit.
    Subject Area
    [OW] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 44700 - United States - Latin American Relations


    Diplomatic and economic relations of the United States with Latin America, from American independence to the present. Evolution of Monroe Doctrine, Mexican War, development of trade and investments, establishment and abandonment of protectorates, Good Neighbor Policy, increased hemispheric interaction in the World War II and Cold War eras.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Eligible for graduate credit.
  
  •  

    HIST 49501 - Undergraduate Readings In History


    Reading course in history.

    Cr. 1-12.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Course may be repeated for credit with different topic for maximum of 12 credit hours.
  
  •  

    HIST 49502 - Proseminar For History Majors


    Selected topics of history.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HIST 21700 or Equivalent

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Restricted to students in history majors or consent of instructor for non-history majors.
    May be repeated for credit with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours.
  
  •  

    HIST 49601 - Internship In History


    Faculty-supervised experience in museum work, historical preservation, historical societies or libraries, or other history-related fields in public or private institutions.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Junior or higher class standing, 12 credits of related course work, and consent of instructor and field supervisor. 

    Cr. 1-6.
  
  •  

    HONR 10101 - Ideas And Human Experience


    A discussion class with limited enrollment and an interdisciplinary foundation. Topics vary and are usually focused on personal growth and exploration. Students are encouraged to think for themselves and look in unusual places to find the answers to life’s tough questions.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Honors Program eligibility or consent of instructor. 

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit for maximum of 3 credit hours.

    Questions about the Honors Program or specific honors courses may be directed to the Honors Program director or to the department sponsoring the course.
  
  •  

    HONR 15000 - Honors H-Option Contract


    A regularly scheduled course may be converted into an honors course through contracted changes to the course syllabus negotiated with a willing instructor. In addition to the contracted course, HONR 15000 with a matching title adding the word “honors” will appear on the student’s transcripts indicating the honors status of the course.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Honors Program eligibility.

    Cr. 0-6.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for maximum of 6 credit hours.

    Questions about the Honors Program or specific honors courses may be directed to the Honors Program director or to the department sponsoring the course.
  
  •  

    HONR 20100 - Interdepartmental Colloquium - Sciences


    Honors seminar focusing on issues in the social and behavioral sciences from an interdisciplinary perspective.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Honors Program eligibility or consent of instructor.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Approved by College of Science for the social and behavioral sciences requirement.

    Questions about the Honors Program or specific honors courses may be directed to the Honors Program director or to the department sponsoring the course.
  
  •  

    HONR 25000 - Honors H-Option Contract


    A regularly scheduled course may be converted into an honors course through contracted changes to the course syllabus negotiated with a willing instructor. In addition to the contracted course, HONR 25000 with a matching title adding the word “honors” will appear on the student’s transcripts indicating the honors status of the course.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Honors Program eligibility.

    Cr. 0-6.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Repeatable for credit for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

    Questions about the Honors Program or specific honors courses may be directed to the Honors Program director or to the department sponsoring the course.
  
  •  

    HONR 30200 - Interdepartmental Colloquium


    Honors seminar focusing on topics in the natural and mathematical sciences areas from an interdisciplinary perspective.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Honors Program eligibility or consent of instructor and sophomore or higher class standing.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Approved by College of Science for the science and mathematics requirement.

    Questions about the Honors Program or specific honors courses may be directed to the Honors Program director or to the department sponsoring the course.
  
  •  

    HONR 35000 - Honors H-Option Contract


    A regularly scheduled course may be converted into an honors course through contracted changes to the course syllabus negotiated with a willing instructor. In addition to the contracted course, HONR 35000 with a matching title adding the word “honors” will appear on the student’s transcripts indicating the honors status of the course.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Honors Program eligibility.

    Cr. 0.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated with different topic.

    Questions about the Honors Program or specific honors courses may be directed to the Honors Program director or to the department sponsoring the course.
  
  •  

    HONR 39901 - Honors Independent Study


    The Honors Program capstone course. The honors project provides an opportunity for honors students to undertake research under the guidance of a faculty mentor. The format may vary, but each project encourages intellectual independence and introduces students to proper research methods in preparation for graduate work. Projects must have some written component and will be a product that is representative of professional work in the chosen field. The project must be presented and defended before a committee including representatives of the Honors Program Council.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Honors Program eligibility or consent of instructor. 

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Course may be repeated for credit.

    Questions about the Honors Program or specific honors courses may be directed to the Honors Program director or to the department sponsoring the course.
  
  •  

    HONR 45001 - Honors H-Option Contract


    A regularly scheduled course may be converted into an honors course through contracted changes to the course syllabus negotiated with a willing instructor. In addition to the contracted course, HONR 45001 with a matching title adding the word “honors” will appear on the student’s transcripts indicating the honors status of the course.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Honors Program eligibility.

    Cr. 0-6.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Course may be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

    Questions about the Honors Program or specific honors courses may be directed to the Honors Program director or to the department sponsoring the course.
  
  •  

    HORT 10100 - Fundamentals Of Horticulture


    Biology and technology involved in the production, storage, processing, and marketing of horticultural plants and products. Laboratories include experiments demonstrating both the theoretical and practical aspects of horticultural plant growth and development.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab. 2.
    Notes
    Requires class trips. Students will pay individual lodging or meal expenses when necessary.
  
  •  

    HPER 11100 - Basketball


    Instruction in fundamental skills of shooting, passing, ball handling, footwork, basic strategies of offensive and defensive play, and interpretation of rules.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Letter grades are given in all HPER classes. Some classes are offered in eight-week sessions; check the Schedule of Classes for scheduling information. Activity classes cannot be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    HPER 11900 - Personal Fitness


    Instruction in basic principles of conditioning and fitness. Emphasis on muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and cardiorespiratory endurance. Designed for students without prior knowledge of conditioning methods.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Notes
    Letter grades are given in all HPER classes.
    Some classes are offered in eight-week sessions; check the Schedule of Classes for scheduling information.
    Activity classes cannot be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    HPER 12100 - Conditioning And Weight Training


    Instruction in basic principles of conditioning and weight training. Emphasis on muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and cardiorespiratory endurance.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 2 credit hours.
  
  •  

    HPER 13300 - Fitness And Jogging I


    Beginning instruction in the basic principles of fitness as they apply to a jogging program. Emphasis on cardiorespiratory endurance and flexibility. Basic concepts underlying Dr. Kenneth Cooper’s aerobic program. For students without prior experience in jogging programs, aerobics levels I through III.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Letter grades are given in all HPER classes.
    Some classes are offered in eight-week sessions; check the Schedule of Classes for scheduling information.
    Activity classes cannot be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    HPER 13501 - Golf


    Beginning instruction in techniques for putting, chipping, pitching, iron swing, and wood strokes. Course includes rules and etiquette of golf. Students play on par 3 course.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Letter grades are given in all HPER classes. Some classes are offered in eight-week sessions; check the Schedule of Classes for scheduling information. Activity classes cannot be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    HPER 15900 - Racquetball


    Instruction in basic skills for beginning players. Includes both four-wall singles and doubles games.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Letter grades are given in all HPER classes. Some classes are offered in eight-week sessions; check the Schedule of Classes for scheduling information. Activity classes cannot be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    HPER 16000 - First Aid And Emergency Care


    Lecture and demonstration of first-aid measures for wounds, hemorrhage, burns, exposure, sprains, dislocation, fractures, unconscious conditions, suffocation, drowning, and poisons, with skill training in all procedures.

    Cr. 2 or 3.
    Notes
    Letter grades are given in all HPER classes.
    Some classes are offered in eight-week sessions; check the Schedule of Classes for scheduling information.
    Activity classes cannot be repeated for credit.
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  •  

    HPER 16300 - Emerging Health Topics


    Addresses topics related to emerging issues that affect the health of individuals and society.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Repeatable for credit up to 15 credit hours.
  
  •  

    HPER 18500 - Volleyball


    Instruction in fundamental skills of power volleyball. Emphasis on overhand serve, bump, set, dig, and spike. Team offensive and defensive strategies included.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Letter grades are given in all HPER classes. Some classes are offered in eight-week sessions; check the Schedule of Classes for scheduling information. Activity classes cannot be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    HPER 19000 - Yoga I


    Hatha yoga postures for flexibility, toning, suppleness, stamina. Deep-complete breathing for vitality and in-depth relaxation. Introduction to basic yogic philosophy.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Letter grades are given in all HPER classes. Some classes are offered in eight-week sessions; check the Schedule of Classes for scheduling information. Activity classes cannot be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    HPER 21100 - Advanced Basketball


    Instruction in advanced skills and team play in basketball. Extension of basic skills with emphasis on improvement of techniques. Also more involved instruction in team offenses and defenses, while developing an understanding of why and when to perform certain team concepts.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HPER 11100 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Letter grades are given in all HPER classes. Some classes are offered in eight-week sessions; check the Schedule of Classes for scheduling information. Activity classes cannot be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    HPER 29000 - Yoga II


    Intensive Hatha yoga postures, additional breathing techniques, extensive relaxation, and continuation of yoga philosophy.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HPER 19000 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Letter grades are given in all HPER classes. Some classes are offered in eight-week sessions; check the Schedule of Classes for scheduling information. Activity classes cannot be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    HSCI 45200 - Clinical Chemistry


    This course is designed to provide the medical technologist with the principles and application of clinical chemistry. Methods of instrumental analysis include a variety of automated procedures, electrophoresis, immunoelectrophoresis, immunodiffusion, radioisotopes, steroids, hormone assay, and toxicology. Quality control for clinical chemistry is included. Supervised clinical laboratory experience is offered, with students rotating through the various areas of clinical chemistry on a sequential rotational basis.

    Cr. 1.
  
  •  

    HSCI 45300 - Clinical Hematology


    Study of the functions, maturation, and morphology of blood cells. Blood cells, platelets, and reticulocyte counting procedure. Experiences in the study of cellular content of other body fluids are offered. Lectures and laboratory are designed to teach techniques of sedimentation rates, hematocrits, corpuscular indices, hemoglobin red cell fragility, and special staining procedures. Also, routine and special coagulation studies are taught. Supervised experience in clinical hematology offers opportunities for study in routine and special hematology and coagulation procedures.

    Cr. 1.
  
  •  

    HSCI 45400 - Clinical Immunohematology


    A review of serologic principles and technical fundamentals of transfusion practice; a comprehensive consideration of all blood groups, with emphasis on ABO and Rh-Hr blood group systems. Extensive practice is gained in pre-transfusion techniques and antibody identification in the laboratory. Other blood types and antigen-antibody relationships are taught in laboratories and lectures. Also included are blood donor room procedures; preparation of blood components; correlation of blood component therapy with disease states; quality control of all reagents, procedures, and equipment used; and laboratory safety measures, all of which offer the best patient care and protection of laboratory personnel.

    Cr. 1.
  
  •  

    HSCI 45500 - Clinical Microbiology


    Lectures and clinical laboratory experience in diagnostic procedures as aids to the diagnosis of human disease. Proper selection of techniques for the isolation and identification of medically important bacteria. Special emphasis is placed on newer methods for anaerobic bacteria identification. Also includes lectures and laboratory identification in the fields of mycology and microbacteriology, with emphasis on isolation and identification. Practical applications of fluorescent antibody tests are performed.

    Cr. 1.
  
  •  

    HSCI 45700 - Clinical Parasitology


    Techniques of specimen examination, identification of cysts and ova, life cycles of parasites.

    Cr. 1.
  
  •  

    HSCI 45800 - Clinical Serology


    Lectures and laboratory experience in serology, including the preparation of antigen, flocculation tests for syphilis, heterophile antibody tests, creative proteins, RA test, FTA, rubella testing. Also included are lectures in immunology that include classifications of immunoglobulins; mechanism of antibody formation; immune response; types of antigen-antibody reactions; and theories of radioimmunoassay.

    Cr. 1-10.
  
  •  

    HSCI 45900 - Clinical Toxicology


    Basic orientation in the use of instrumentation, such as mass spectrophotometry, and liquid and gas chromatography that is used in the specialized toxicology laboratory.

    Cr. 1.
  
  •  

    HSCI 46000 - Clinical Urinalysis


    Routine analysis, chemical tests, sediment identification, renal function tests, pregnancy tests.

    Cr. 1.
  
  •  

    HSCI 49000 - VT- Special Topics


    Special topics, projects, or readings in selected areas of health sciences at a level appropriate for senior students. Permission of instructor required.

    Cr. 1.
    Variable Title
    VT- Special Topics
  
  •  

    HSRV 10000 - Introduction To Human Services


    An orientation to human services. History, current concepts, ethics, and roles of the various workers in the field are discussed.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    This course is open to non-HSRV majors.
  
  •  

    HSRV 10300 - Helping Relationship Techniques


    This course will provide students with opportunities to increase their effectiveness in helping people. This course will examine the helping process in terms of skills, helping relationship. This course is appropriate for anyone who is entering a career dealing with people.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    This course is open to non-HSRV majors.
  
  •  

    HSRV 10500 - Basic Interviewing Skills


    This course is designed to introduce and develop skills associated with interviewing clients. The focus will be on skill-building and competencies in attending behaviors, client observation skills, open and closed questions, encourager skills, paraphrasing and summarizing, and reflection of feelings and meaning. Advanced interviewing skills will include confrontation, focusing, and information giving.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    This course is open to non-Human Services majors.
  
  •  

    HSRV 10600 - Medical Terminology


    This course is designed to provide a general understanding of the language of medicine, including word construction, definitions, spelling, and abbreviations. Emphasis is placed on speaking, reading and writing skills.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HSRV 16900 - Introduction To Wellness And Stress Management


    Introduction to the philosophies and techniques for achieving individual wellness and optimum health. Includes topics in stress management, nutrition awareness, lifestyle planning, nontraditional approaches to building healthy lifestyles, exercise, and psychophysiological well-being. Class sessions will incorporate experiential and participatory styles of learning, lecture, discussion, and small group interaction.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HSRV 20000 - Behavioral Therapies


    This course will cover major theories, terms, and techniques of behavioral therapeutic approaches. It will explore a broad range of intervention strategies with application appropriate for diverse problems. The course will critically examine how these techniques can be adapted in different cultures where different interpersonal dynamics and values may exist.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HSRV 10000, 10300 and 10500.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HSRV 20100 - Clinical In Case Study Method I


    This is the first of two courses which will provide the student with field opportunities in an approved field instruction site that provides structured learning opportunities for the student to demonstrate human services foundational knowledge, professional standards, and practice competencies required of an entry-level human services worker. An agency supervisor and a faculty member supervise students as they complete the required 180 hours of fieldwork. The classroom component relates theory and principles of practice to agency field-study experience. Through group interaction, discussion, and analysis, students learn to develop supportive relationships with clients and apply the values of confidentiality and client self-determination. They learn how their values and personal experiences affect their work with clients.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  HSRV 10000, 10300 and 10500.

    Cr. 2.
    Notes
    This course is restricted to Human Services majors. Departmental approval required to register.
  
  •  

    HSRV 21100 - Dynamics Of Group Behavior


    Focus is upon the properties of groups, awareness of personal factors in group interaction, dimensions of leadership behavior in achieving group effectiveness, characteristics of larger social systems, and the dynamics of change. Small-group experiences are supplemented by skill practice sessions and theory presentations. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: HSRV 10000, 10300 and 10500.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Restricted to Human Services majors or consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    HSRV 25100 - Clinical In Case Study Method II


    This is the second of two courses which will provide the student with field opportunities in an approved field instruction site that provides structured learning opportunities for the student to demonstrate human services foundational knowledge, professional standards, and practice competencies required of an entry-level human services worker. An agency supervisor and a faculty member supervise students as they complete the required 180 hours of field work. The classroom component relates theory and principles of practice to agency field-study experience. Through group interaction, discussion, and analysis, students learn to develop supportive relationships with clients and apply the values of confidentiality and client self-determination. They learn how their values and personal experiences affect their work with clients.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HSRV 20100.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    This course is restricted to HSRV majors and must have departmental approval.
  
  •  

    HSRV 29900 - Mental Health Technology


    Hours and subject matter are arranged. See department for current course selection.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  Department approval required.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Repeatable for credit for a maximum of 9 credit hours.
  
  •  

    HSRV 30300 - Interdisciplinary Healthcare In Gerontology


    Research that encompasses the holistic aspect of geriatric health care that promotes healthy aging and optimal quality of life is included in the course study. A focus of ageism and stigmatization are integrated into the course. Geriatric health assessment and correlation of physiological disease processes such as diabetes, vascular disease, cardiac, pulmonary, and renal disease are studied. Psychological disease processes that include dementia, depression, and etiologies of behavioral changes commonly experienced by the elderly population are emphasized.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HSRV 31500 - Introduction To Theory And Therapies


    Discusses specific theories and therapies that are essential for human service professional practice. This course also provides knowledge that is required to pass the Indiana certification examination for addiction counselors.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PSY 12000, HSRV 20000 and 20100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HSRV 32000 - Case Methods


    This course will provide theoretical knowledge of techniques in case management related to human service clients and agencies. Case management with a wide range of populations will be discussed.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HSRV 10000, HSRV 10300, HSRV 10500, HSRV 20000, HSRV 20100 and HSRV 21100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HSRV 32400 - Non-Profit Management


    The focus of non-profit human services agencies is to serve clients as well as to function as a business. This course will provide information on managing non-profit agencies. Topics will include: working with a board of directors, budget, engagement with stakeholders, information dissemination, fundraising, grant writing, logic models, ethics, human resource and legal issues, marketing, strategic planning and program evaluation.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  HSRV 20100 and 25100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HSRV 33000 - Psychopharm Human Services


    An overview of the effects and side effects of psychiatric medications. Focus of the course will be knowledge useful in identifying 1) whether or not a client is responding to pharmacological treatment and 2) client behaviors indicating adverse effects of medication that should be reported to the client’s healthcare provider.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PSY 35000, HSRV 20000 and 21100.

    Cr. 1.
  
  •  

    HSRV 35000 - Drugs And Society


    Emphasizes the social, psychological, biological, and cultural contexts in which addiction develops and occurs. Encourages an understanding of substance use, abuse, and addictive behaviors within a larger pattern. For this reason, the course is applicable to anyone who will be in a position in which they must a) work with people on a daily basis, b) provide supervision or support services within an organization, or c) work in any aspect of the helping professions.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HSRV 37700 - Ethics, Policy, Law And Professional Issues In Human Services


    This course will examine ethics, social policy, and laws that arise in the practice of human services. In addition, standards for professional behavior in human services will be addressed.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HSRV 10000, 10300, 10500, 20000 and 21100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HSRV 39900 - Special Topics


    Hours, credits, and subject matter to be arranged by department. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: HSRV 31500 and 32000.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Repeatable for credit for a maximum of 9 credit hours.
  
  •  

    HSRV 40000 - Internship I


    This course will provide experiential learning related to human service agencies. Students will be assigned to a human service agency and work with an agency supervisor to apply knowledge of case management skills including intake, client assessment, and development and implementation of intervention plans.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HSRV 31500, 32000 and 25100; C: HSRV 40100.

    Cr. 1-4.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Course may be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credit hours.
    Restricted to students who are admitted to the B.S. in Human Services degree program (Human Services majors).
    Additionally, departmental approval is required to enroll.
  
  •  

    HSRV 40100 - Internship Seminar I


    This course will focus on professionalism, ethical issues, and social welfare policy as applied with human service clients and agencies.

    Preparation for Course
    C: HSRV 40000.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Restricted to students admitted to the B.S. in Human Services degree program. Additionally, departmental approval is required to enroll.
  
  •  

    HSRV 41700 - Research Methods


    This course is designed to provide the student with a comprehensive knowledge of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed method research designs. Specific information will be provided on: the research problem, the research question, IRB application and the informed consent form, the literature review, instrumentation, methodology, ethics, and the research proposal.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HSRV 31500 and 32000, ENG 23301, and STAT 12500.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Departmental approval required to enroll.
  
  •  

    HSRV 41900 - Advanced Intervention Strategies


    This course builds on and complements foundational courses in the Department of Human Services. This course is intended for upper level students who have successfully grasped the concepts in lower level interviewing, helping relationships, and behavior modification courses. Intervention techniques with applicability to: individual, family, and group counseling, schools, and organizations will be covered. From a perspective of Choice Theory, key concepts in this course include: cultural competency, individual choices, mental health issues, and the process of assessing, implementing, and evaluating interventions for a wide range of populations.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HSRV 31500 and 32000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HSRV 42000 - Substance Abuse Prevention


    Provides an overview of substance abuse theory, practice, and prevention. Includes concepts related to substance abuse prevention in the educational setting.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HSRV 45000 - Internship II


    This course will provide advanced experiential learning related to human service agencies. Students will be assigned to a human service agency and work with an agency supervisor to apply knowledge of program evaluation, legal implications related to human service practice, and management issues related to directing human service programs.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HSRV40000 and 40100. C: HSRV 45100.

    Cr. 2-4.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Restricted to students who are admitted to the B.S. in Human Services degree program. Departmental approval required.
  
  •  

    HSRV 45100 - Internship Seminar II


    This course will provide a forum for discussion of advanced theories and skills applicable to developing, assessing, and managing human service agencies. Topics will include program evaluation, legal implications related to human service practice, and management issues related to implementing human service programs. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: HSRV 40000 and 40100.  C: HSRV45000.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Restricted to students admitted to B.S. in Human Services degree program. Departmental approval required.
  
  •  

    HTM 10000 - Introduction To The Hospitality And Tourism Industry


    An overview of supervisory careers, opportunities, and responsibilities in the food service, lodging, and tourism industry including historical developments, pioneers, and industry leaders; representatives or companies from the three areas.

    Cr. 1-3.
  
  •  

    HTM 14100 - Financial Accounting For The Service Industries


    This course covers fundamental accounting principles and procedures applied to the hospitality and service industries. Topics include the uniform system of accounts, financial statements, special purpose journals, and subsidiary ledgers unique to the hospitality and service industries. This course also introduces financial statement analysis.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HTM 17300 - Introduction To Tourism Management


    This is an introduction to tourism management using a system approach that integrates a variety of hospitality and travel organizations and businesses. It focuses on the understanding of tourism from the perspectives of travelers and destinations, while identifying tourism’s economic, socio-cultural, and environmental impacts on communities.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HTM 18100 - Lodging Management


    Organization, management and operating procedures of lodging facilities. Guest-employee interactions will be analyzed along with current trends and cutting edge topics in the lodging industry. A history of the lodging industry will be discussed.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 10000 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HTM 19100 - Sanitation And Health In Foodservice, Lodging, And Tourism


    This course introduces students to the foodservice component of the Hospitality and Tourism industry and explores food safety and other health related issues. Application of sanitation principles in restaurants, hospitals, schools, hotels, cruise ships, airlines, and international travel are covered. Students must pass a National Sanitation Certification Examination to receive credit. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 10000 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HTM 21400 - Introduction To Food Selection And Preparation


    This course will introduce students to fundamental knowledge, skills and working environment pertaining to professional food preparation through lecture and laboratory exercises. Lectures will introduce food types, compare and contrast culinary methods as well as explain the underpinning physical and bio-chemical transformations that are occurring. Laboratory work will allow students to observe and practice professional cooking as well as appreciate the results from a consumer’s perspective. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 19100 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab 3.
  
  •  

    HTM 21500 - Science Of Cooking


    This course examines the fundamental principles of good cooking applied to a commercial kitchen environment by examining and applying basic scientific principles. The focus is developing an understanding of the processes that will ensure consistent results of quality food preparations. 

    Preparation for Course
    P:  HTM 21400.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    $50.00 lab fee; uniform and knife set assessment if not previously purchased.
  
  •  

    HTM 22400 - Destination Management/Convention Management


    This course will give students a basic understanding of the roles destination management organizations (DMOs) and convention and visitors bureaus (CVBs) play in the tourism industry. All aspects of organization operations are covered, including service, research, product development, human resources, and financial management.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  HTM 10000, 18100 and 21400.

    Cr. 3.
 

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