Oct 07, 2022  
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order.

Standard information for each course includes the number, title, and credits (sometimes called credit hours or semester hours). For some courses, you will find information on the hours of class, laboratory, or studio for which the course is scheduled in each week of a regular semester; these weekly hours are expanded during summer sessions. Fees for courses are assessed on the basis of credits and other factors.

The course-numbering system generally suggests levels of difficulty and appropriateness. Courses at the 100 and 200 levels comprise introductory offerings and those are most commonly taken by freshmen and sophomores. Courses at the 300 and 400 levels are primarily for juniors and seniors. In some Purdue programs, undergraduates take courses at the 500 level, but generally courses numbered 500 and above are for graduate students.

Preparation for courses is indicated as follows:

P: indicates a prerequisite that must precede your enrollment in the course described. You may find one or more specific course numbers, the number of credits you should already have in a subject, a placement-test level, or other conditions.

C: indicates a corequisite that must be taken no later than the same semester in which you take the course described.

R: indicates a recommendation concerning conditions to be met for enrollment in the course.

When no subject code is shown for prerequisites, corequisites, and recommended courses, they are in the same subject area as the course being described. If you lack a prerequisite or corequisite, or if you wish to take a course numbered at a higher level than your present status, you should seek the department’s or instructor’s consent to enroll in the course.

V.T. means Variable Title and is shown for courses for which the title may be changed to specify the topic or other special focus of each offering.

Purdue University Fort Wayne reserves the right to add, withdraw, or change courses without notice.

 

 
  
  •  

    AD 49500 - Readings And Research In Art History


    For students wishing to pursue undergraduate research. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: AD 11100 And 11201.

    Cr. 1-4.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Eligible for graduate credit. 
    Minimum grade of C- for credit towards Art and Design degrees.
  
  •  

    AD 49501 - Independent Study In Fine Arts


    This course provides the opportunity for a student to pursue studio interests (such as mixed media) not served in other course offerings. Projects may vary. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: senior standing and permission of chair.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Studio 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated.
    Dual Level Course
    Eligible for graduate credit.
  
  •  

    AD 49502 - Thesis Seminar And Exhibition I


    This course enables students to organize a body of work as a major thesis intended for exhibition. The subject must be approved by the department chairman and thematic constructs guided by the course instructor and discipline specialists. Students will also be prepared for seeking employment or applying to Graduate School. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: Department approval required.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Minimum grade of C- required to count towards any program of the Department of Art and Design.
    May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credit hours.
  
  •  

    AD 49600 - Thesis Seminar And Exhibition II


    The approved thesis project organized in the previous semester will be completed in readiness for a public group exhibition. Students will create their theses statements and be involved in planning, marketing and executing the exhibition. They will also be prepared for public gallery talk presentations.  

    Preparation for Course
    P:  AD 49502 (or equivalent) with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Minimum grade of C- required to count towards any program of the Department of Art and Design.
  
  •  

    AGEC 21700 - Economics


    National economic problems such as unemployment, recessions, inflation, taxation, bank interest rates, the growth of government, monetary systems, and a rising national debt are discussed along with the principles, policies, and institutions for solving these macroeconomic problems.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Course will appear on Purdue University transcript as AGEC 21700.
  
  •  

    AGEC 32700 - Principles Of Food And Agribusiness Marketing


    This course is a study of the major components of marketing decisions made by food and agribusiness firms. The course examines the marketing process, market research, marketing opportunities, and marketing strategies. Students will work on developing skills for evaluating and making marketing decisions.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Students register for AGR 32700 at Purdue Fort Wayne, but will take AGEC 32700 online through Purdue West Lafayette.
  
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    AGEC 35200 - Quantitative Techniques For Firm Decision Making


    Introduction to mathematical programming and computing as an aid to agricultural decision making by firms, linear programming, game theory and strategy, simulation, the waiting-line problem, the equipment replacement decision, and multiproduct scheduling methods.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Students register for AGR 35200 at Purdue Fort Wayne, but will take AGEC 35200 online through Purdue West Lafayette.
  
  •  

    AGR 10100 - Introduction To Agriculture And Purdue


    Students are introduced to the College of Agriculture and Purdue University. Specific areas discussed include the diversity of career opportunities within agriculture, the relationships between different areas of agriculture; ethics; the impact of undergraduate course work, including the core curriculum, on scholarship and career preparation; and the challenges facing the food, agricultural, and natural resource systems. The use of guest lecturers provides a networking opportunity for students.

    Cr. 0.5.
    Notes
    Enrollment in this course is restricted to beginning freshmen students. Course meets during weeks 1-8.
  
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    ANSC 10100 - Animal Agriculture


    Importance of livestock in the field of agriculture, and the place of meats and other animal products in the human diet.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANSC 22100 - Principles Of Animal Nutrition


    Classification and function of nutrients, deficiency symptoms, digestive processes, characterization of feedstuffs, and formulation of diets for domestic animals.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CHM 11200 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 10005 - Anthropology And Sociology Student Success Seminar


    Provides new Anthropology and Sociology majors with an understanding of their major, the resources available to help them along their path to receiving their degree, and ways to apply that degree and the skills they have learned in pursuing various professional and career trajectories. Students will also learn about specific resources and opportunities to help them be successful at Purdue and in the world of work and post-graduate education. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: Student in Anthropology or Sociology major or minor.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Required for all students who have declared Anthropology or Sociology as their primary major within the past year. May be taken by Anthropology and Sociology minors.
  
  •  

    ANTH 10501 - Culture And Society


    An introduction to the variations and diversities of living human groups. Social structure, religion, ecology, marriage, and personality variations of peoples of the world. Emphasis on preliterate cultures.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 20000 - Topics In Anthropology Of Culture And Society


    Selected topics in the anthropological study of social and cultural institutions. Emphasizes understanding and developing anthropological approaches to questions about social, economic, political, and historical relationships among groups and individuals in contexts across the globe. Course topics may utilize ethnographic, archaeological, linguistic, and historical information. 

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated with different topic for up to six credit hours.
  
  •  

    ANTH 20001 - Bioanthropology


    An introduction to the biological nature of mankind. The evolution of human beings. An examination of speciation, race, and racial groups. The future evolution of humans.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 20002 - Language And Culture


    An introduction to the study of language and its relations to the rest of culture.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 20003 - Introduction To Prehistoric Archaeology


    World archaeology in the framework of major prehistoric cultural innovations. History, techniques, methods, and significance of archaeological research.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 20402 - Ritual In Human Life


    This course explores the nature of ritual and the role it plays in human culture. By exploring central topics in anthropology (religion, worldview, gender, economics, and embodiment), the course illustrates how human behavior is understood in cultural contexts and reveals humanity’s diversity and commonality. Ritual in Human Life is designed for the non-anthropology major yet emphasizes the development of skills used in the anthropological study of human behavior and belief.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 31001 - Introduction To Cultures In Africa


    Explores the vitality and diversity of African cultures today in communities ranging from town neighborhoods to remote villages and from desert to rainforest. Demonstrates the tenacity and creativity of human societies facing severe political, social, and ecological pressures, but also contributes new questions and answers to global debates about family values, ethnicity, terrorism, hunger, and economic growth.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 31300 - Archaeology Of North America


    Archaeological overview of North America emphasizing Indigenous cultures prior to the arrival of Europeans, but including Contact and Post-Contact communities of the Historic Period. Topics will include the peopling of the Americas, culture and environment, social complexity, and Cultural Resource Management.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 34500 - Internship In Anthropology


    This course and associated internship provide students with a structured, supervised professional work experience relevant to Anthropology as a discipline. The internship offers students the opportunity to use the concepts, theories and perspectives acquired in the classroom in an applied environment. It allows students the chance to explore career options, develop professionalism and career-relevant skills, and prepare for careers after graduation. Students interested in pursuing an internship are strongly encouraged to contact the Internship Advisor to discuss options well in advance of the semester’s start. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: ANTH 10501 and either ANTH 20001, 20002 or 20003 and either ENGL 23301 or 23401 (or equivalents) with grades of C- or better and admitted into an Anthropology major or minor with sophomore or higher class standing.  Instructor approval required.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 34800 - Peoples And Cultures Of Russia, Ukraine, And Newly Independent States


    An introduction to the peoples and cultures of Eurasia, especially the former Soviet Union. Use case studies and ethnographies to learn about the histories of specific regions and groups, and to discuss religion and tradition, historical memory and cultural heritage, gender, childhood, and popular culture. 

    Cr. 3.
  
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    ANTH 35001 - European Ethnography


    European peoples and cultures. Emphasis on comparison of cultural assumption and social organization of selected European cultures; techniques for anthropological research in European societies.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ANTH 10501 or consent of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
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    ANTH 35002 - Archaeology Of Ancient Mexico


    Surveys the archaeology of ancient Mexico. Traces cultural developments of indigenous peoples from the Olmec to the Aztec, and examines issues, controversies, and current debates in Mexican archaeology. Topics include the transition to settled villages, initial complexity, craft production, urbanization, ideology, gender, religion, warfare, and the conquest.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 35600 - Polynesian Cultures


    This course will provide students with a broad overview of the peoples and distinctive cultures of the Central and South Pacific island worlds of Polynesia. We will examine Polynesia over time beginning when the islands were settled in the prehistoric era, discuss the transformations that occurred through Western contact and colonialization, and consider the more recent impacts of globalization. We will explore many of the central topics in anthropological studies of Polynesia, including political and social organization; economics; gender and sexuality; identity and personhood; art and dance; and religious belief and practice. We will finish the course by looking at important contemporary issues, such as transnational migration, tourism, public health dilemmas, and transformations in cultural and ethnic identities. Readings and films have been selected to give students experience with a variety of different Polynesian societies, including Hawai’i, Samoa, the Kingdom of Tonga, Tahiti, Tuvalu, the Cook Islands, Rotuma, and the Maori of Aotearoa (New Zealand).

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 37001 - Ancient Civilizations Of The Andes


    Evidence for successive migrations into the continent, the subsequent development of local cultures, and civilization in the central Andes. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: ANTH 20003 or consent of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by the College of Liberal Arts for the nonwestern culture studies requirement.
  
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    ANTH 37500 - Cultural Psychiatry


    This course surveys contemporary theory and research on the complex interaction of culture and mental health. We will examine a range of mental disorders in various societies, forms of psychiatric treatment and healing, and key concepts and methods used in the study of mental health and culture.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 37600 - Archaeology Of Death


    Examination of mortuary behavior using archaeological and biological data. Methods of studying variation in mortuary practices. Identification of skeletal remains in laboratory setting.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 38501 - Topics In Anthropology


    A conceptual examination of selected topics in the field of anthropology.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ANTH 10501 or 20001 or 20002 or 20003 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  •  

    ANTH 39800 - Peoples And Cultures Of Central Asia


    General anthropological introduction to societies and cultures of contemporary Muslim successor states of former Soviet Central Asia, Western China (Xinjiang), and Iran and Afghanistan. Topics include ecology, ethnohistory, traditional subsistence strategies, family, kinship, gender, sociopolitical organization, impact of colonial rule of tsarist and Soviet Russia and China and development of modern nation-states in Iran and Afghanistan, dynamics of current conflicts and future prospects.

    Preparation for Course
    No special knowledge of the region on the part of students is presumed. However, a background in general anthropology would be helpful, but not essential.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 40002 - Archaeological Methods And Techniques


    Methods and mechanics of archaeology in field and laboratory. Use of survey instruments, drawing tools, and photographic equipment, treatment of recovered materials leading to printed report. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: Consent of Intructor required.

    Cr. 2-4.
    Notes
    Eligible for graduate credit.
  
  •  

    ANTH 40200 - Gender In Cross-Cultural Perspective


    This course considers the meaning and social implications of gender in human society. Cultural definitions of “male” and “female” gender categories as well as associated behavioral and structural differentiation of gender roles will be analyzed using current anthropological concepts and theories.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 40500 - Ethnographic Methods


    This course introduces students to the basic methods of ethnographic research: the collection, analysis, and presentation of data derived from the systematic, direct observation of human behavior and interviewing of key informants. Students are required to complete a field project.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 40501 - Fieldwork In Archaeology


    Archaeological work directed toward field techniques: excavation and preservation of materials, surveying, photography, cataloguing. One credit hour per full week of fieldwork. 

    Cr. 1-8.
    Notes
    Repeatable for up to 8 credits hours.
    Eligible for graduate credit.
  
  •  

    ANTH 40502 - Fieldwork In Bioanthropology


    Fieldwork In Bioanthropology.

    Cr. 1-8.
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    ANTH 40600 - Visual Anthropology


    This course explores the use of visual media, including both ethnographic films and still photography, as a tool for anthropologists as we seek to understand the human condition.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 41700 - State Of The World: Social Theory And Human Crisis In The Twenty-First Century


    In this course we will examine a series of urgent issues facing the global community through reading ethnography and studying social theory. For each issue, we will read recent ethnographic research that illuminates the issue as well as social theories that connect the issue to long-standing zones of theorizing among social scientists. Through careful reading and discussion, students will learn about the urgent issues that will shape their professional and personal lives, become familiar with theoretical approaches that illuminate these issues, and engage in discussion and debate about these issues in a diverse classroom. The following issues is a sample of the types of global issues that the course will cover: the environment (i. e., global warming, environmental critiques of capitalism, the struggle for indigenous rights to land, the energy economy), global struggles for rights (for indigenous peoples, women, the LGBTQ community, the global underclass, stateless peoples), the state system (to include an examination of the nature of the state, authoritarian and leaderless states, democracy in crisis, the warlord state), technological change (social media, AI, cyberwarfare), and violence (weak states, the global arms trade, the nuclear threat). Theoretical perspectives to be covered include historical materialism, world systems theory, gender studies, subaltern studies, postcolonialism, poststructuralism, and others.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 42100 - Moche Archaeology Seminar


    The Moche were an archaeological culture from the desert coast of Peru that provide an opportunity to explore anthropological theories regarding nascent state formation, priestly elites, feasting and ritual, human sacrifice, conflict and warfare, environmental degradation, and societal collapse. We will explore these topics using a comparative, four-field anthropological approach.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ANTH 20003 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 42600 - Human Osteology


    This course explores the types of information that can be recovered from bones, including age, sex, size, pathology, diet, and demography as well as how this information can be utilized to obtain an integrated picture of an individual. The skills learned are applicable to forensic anthropology, archeology, human evolution and anatomy.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 43000 - Archaeology Of Violence And Conflict


    In this course we will examine how we identify violence and warfare in the past. Second, we will explore how violence has affected societies around the world and through time. We review multidisciplinary literature on violence and ask how and why violent acts and institutions of violence develop and persist.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 44500 - Medical Anthropology


    An examination of health, disease, medicine and curing in a cross-cultural perspective. Focus on investigations into the ideology and meaning of illness, the relationship between patient and healer, and how responsibility for illness is assigned. Medical anthropology is concerned with knowledge about the socio-cultural contexts of disease and healing, and with how such knowledge might inform the management of our own health problems. 

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 44501 - History And Theory Of Anthropology


    An examination of the historical development of the field of anthropology concentrating upon the intellectual roots and context that surrounded its emergence as well as contemporary problems, perspectives, methods, and theories. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: ANTH 10501 and 20001 with grades of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 45500 - Anthropology Of Religion


    Critical evaluation of current approaches to the analysis of religious myth, ritual, and symbolism. Problems in understanding religious beliefs of other cultures. Modern development of the anthropology of religion.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by the College of Liberal Arts for the non-Western culture studies requirement.
    Eligible for graduate credit.
  
  •  

    ANTH 45700 - Ethnic Identity


    Nature of ethnic groups and identity viewed in cross-cultural perspective: effects of colonialism and nationalism on ethnic groups; use of identity as an adaptive strategy; stereotypes and stereotyping; symbols and styles of ethnic identity; and retention and elaboration of local styles.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 47000 - Psychological Anthropology


    The similarity and diversity of human personalities. How culture forms personalities and is formed by them. Focus on individual variation within a cultural framework.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by the College of Liberal Arts for the non-western culture studies requirement.
    Eligible for graduate credit.
  
  •  

    ANTH 49000 - Development And Anthropology


    The vast majority of the world’s people live in poverty, and lack access to many basic resources, services and rights. They face problems and challenges that are difficult for most Americans to understand. It is even harder for us to find ways of helping these people solve their economic, social and political problems.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ANTH 49500 - Individual Readings In Anthropology


    A supervised, in-depth examination through individual research on a particular topic selected and conducted by the student in consultation with an anthropology faculty member. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: Consent of instructor required.

    Cr. 1-4.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit up to 8 credit hours. Eligible for graduate credit.
  
  •  

    ANTH 49600 - Field Study In Anthropology


    Planning of research project during year preceding summer in field. Time spent in research must amount to at least one week for each credit hour granted. Research paper must be presented by end of semester following field study. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: Permission of Instructor And Department Chair Required.

    Cr. 3-8.
    Notes
    May be repeated for up to 8 credit hours.
  
  •  

    ARET 11000 - Sketching For Technology And Design


    Focusing on problems of the built environment this course teaches students how to represent proportionately objects, planes, and volumes by developing observational skills and hand to eye coordination. Students are introduced to fundamental knowledge in composition, line work, lettering, contour drawing, sketching, shades, shadows, multiview drawings, sectional views, isometrics, and perspective drawing. Skills are developed in the use of multiple media including pen and ink, pencil, and monotone marker rendering.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ARET 12300 - Digital Graphics For Built Environment I


    Introduction to graphic communication in the architectural, engineering, and interior design professions. CAD software and/or other digital media are utilized in the production of working drawings. Projects are adapted to the various professions.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab. 2-4.
  
  •  

    ARET 12400 - Architectural Engineering Construction I


    A study of residential building and the graphic and written documents required for its construction. CAD familiarity is required and a model may be required.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ARET 12300 with a grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 1, Lab. 4-6.
  
  •  

    ARET 16700 - Construction Systems And Materials


    Properties of construction materials and components and an introduction to their use in various construction systems.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ARET 21000 - Architecture And Urban Form


    Study of the forces that shape the built environment: theories of design, design principles, historic styles, topography, structure, materials, including political, social, cultural influences, and sustainability. 

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ARET 22200 - Architectural Engineering Construction II


    Preparation of preliminary and working drawings for an intermediate-sized commercial or institutional building.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ARET 12400 with a grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 1, Lab. 4-6.
  
  •  

    ARET 22300 - Digital Graphics For Built Environment II


    An advanced presentation of digital graphic communication for the Architectural, Engineering, and Construction (AEC) industry.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ARET 12400 With grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab 3.
  
  •  

    ARET 28100 - Environmental Equipment For Buildings I


    A survey of basic environmental control parameters of heating, ventilating, air conditioning, plumbing, lighting, electricity, and their equipment (size and shapes) and the physiological effects on mankind. Emphasis placed on definitions, types of systems, and physical characteristics of equipment.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ARET 12400 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ARET 31000 - Architecture And Urban Form In The Modern World


    A survey of architectural and engineering developments by site visitations.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ARET 32400 - Sustainable Construction


    This course approaches sustainable construction for buildings by examining the physiology required for human functions and considers how building components and systems affect human performance and well-being. Examines the construction process from site planning through construction process, to commissioning and occupancy. Develops understanding of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) criteria. A model may be required. Computer application.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CNET 44500 with a grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 1, Lab. 6.
  
  •  

    ARET 49900 - Architectural Engineering Technology


    Hours, subject matter and credit to be arranged with staff.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Must be Construction Engineering Technology (CNET) major. 

    Cr. 1-6.
    Hours
    Lab. 1-6.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  •  

    ASTR 10000 - Descriptive: The Solar System


    Celestial sphere, measurement of time, earth as a planet, moon, eclipses, planets and their satellites, comets, meteors, theories on origin of solar system.

    Cr. 3 or 4.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab 2.
    Notes
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  •  

    ASTR 10500 - Stars And Galaxies


    Introduction to the physical universe. Topics include: constellations, gravity, radiation, the Sun, structure and evolution of stars, neutron stars and black holes, the Milky Way galaxy, normal galaxies, active galaxies, quasars, cosmology, and the search for extraterrestrial life.

    Cr. 3 or 4.
  
  •  

    ASTR 36300 - The Solar System


    This course is intended for students in science or engineering. The components of the course consist of an overview of solar system objects and an overview of the physical processes that control the evolution of solar system objects since formation. The overview of solar system includes observations of the Sun, planets, asteroids and Kuiper-belt objects, comets, and interplanetary dust. Specific processes that are discussed include hydrostatic equilibrium, orbital dynamics, radioactive decay, and heat flow. The role of these processes in shaping planetary surfaces and atmosphere is explored.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PHYS 22000 or 21800 or 15200 with grade of C-or better, or P or C: MA 16500 or 16600 or 17500 or 26100 or 36100 or 36300 with grade of C- or better. 

    Cr 3.
  
  •  

    ASTR 36400 - Stars And Galaxies


    This course is intended for students in Science or Engineering. This is the second of a two-semester introductory sequence on astronomy and astrophysics, although it is designed to be a standalone course. It is intended mainly for Science and Engineering majors who are comfortable with calculus-based content. The course provides an overview of the formation and evolution of stars, galaxies, and clusters of galaxies. Selected topics that are covered in more detail include stellar structure and atmosphere, properties of black holes, neutron stars, and white dwarfs, galactic dynamics, and dark matter in galaxies and clusters of galaxies. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: PHYS 15200 or PHYS 21800 or PHYS 22000.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    This course is intended for students in Science or Engineering.
  
  •  

    ASTR 37000 - Cosmology


    The picture of how the Universe came to be and how it has evolved has recently come into sharp focus. This progress is the result of improved observational techniques that have resulted in high-resolution images of very distant galaxies, a more accurate mapping of the Large Scale Structure of the Universe, or the high-resolution picture of the young universe provided by Cosmic Microwave Background observations. We will present a historical perspective of how ideas and data have shaped Cosmology through the centuries. In addition, we will review the theoretical models that are in agreement with the current observations. Our goal will be to provide the students with a broad overview of the current research in Cosmology with an eye toward stimulating the student’s curiosity about the many questions still awaiting answers in this field. Basic physics and math knowledge will be assumed. 

    Preparation for Course
    Basic physics and math knowledge will be assumed.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Intended for science and engineering majors.
  
  •  

    ASTR 40100 - Introduction To Astrophysics


    This course is an overview of astrophysics with an emphasis on how physics is applied to astronomy. It will explore the fundamental physical concepts and apply basic principles such as Newton’s laws of motion, Newtonian gravitation and orbital mechanics, electromagnetic waves and behavior, kinetic theory of gases, special and general relativity, and quantum mechanics to astronomical systems.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PHYS 25100 with a Grade of C- or better and MA 26100.

    Cr. 3.
  
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    ASTR 45100 - Galaxies And Large Scale Structure


    The course covers basic observed properties and models of galactic structure, dynamics of stars, physics of the interstellar medium and intergalactic medium, formation of galaxies, properties of clusters of galaxies, and dark matter.

    Preparation for Course
    P: MA 26100 and PHYS 34200 with grades of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ASTR 47100 - Stellar Evolution


    We will discuss observations related to stellar astrophysics. These will include formation of galaxies and stars; evolution of stars; cosmology; cosmic rays, their origin and acceleration; radio astronomy, radio galaxies; the H-21 cm line; gravitational radiation; stellar X-rays and gamma rays.

    Preparation for Course
    P: MA 26100 and PHYS 34200 with grades of C- or better. 

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    This is a calculus-based course.
  
  •  

    BIOL 10000 - Introduction To The Biological World


    Principles of biological organization from molecules through ecosystems. Emphasis on processes common to all organisms and on concepts related to problems of current importance.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course along with BIOL 10001.
    No credit towards a degree in IU Allied Health.
    Credit given for only one of the following: BIOL 10000, BIOL 11700, BIOL 25000.
  
  •  

    BIOL 10001 - Introduction To The Biological World Laboratory


    Laboratory exercises and experiments that illustrate selected principles of biology.

    Preparation for Course
    P or C: BIOL 10000.

    Cr. 1.
    Hours
    Lab. 2.
    Notes
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course with BIOL 10000.
  
  •  

    BIOL 10500 - Medical Terminology


    Emphasis on learning the meanings of the more common word elements associated with medicine and applying that knowledge to define medical terms.

    Cr. 1.
  
  •  

    BIOL 11700 - Principles Of Ecology And Evolution


    Principles of organismic and evolutionary biology; a phylogenetic synopsis of the major groups of organisms from viruses to vertebrates; an introduction to genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes; population biology; community ecology; and behavior. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: Placement at or above MA 15300 or Equivalent. 

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab. 3.
    Notes
    This course is open only to science majors; consent of instructor required for non-biology majors.
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course along with BIOL 11900.
  
  •  

    BIOL 11900 - Principles Of Structure And Function


    Introduction to the structure and function of biological organisms at the cellular and organismal levels. Principles of cell structure, function, and information; energy flow within cells; structure of function of plants and animals; integration of physiological processes; development of plants and animals. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: Placement at or above MA 15300 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab. 3.
    Notes
    This course is open to science majors only; consent of instructor required for non-biology majors.
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course along with BIOL 11700.
  
  •  

    BIOL 12000 - Biology Resource Seminar


    Provides incoming Biology majors with an overview of the degree program and its application to relevant professions. Focus will be on: campus resources and strategies for success, information literacy and scientific thinking, career paths in biology, and responsibilities of biologists. Presentations will be made by Department of Biology faculty, guest speakers from on and off campus, and advanced students in support of class discussion.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Biology major with freshman class standing.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Pass/No Pass grades assigned.
  
  •  

    BIOL 12600 - Human Biology


    Introduction to scientific inquiry with special emphasis on the structure and function of cells, tissues, organs, and systems of the human biology. Topics relate to fitness, nutrition, health, inheritance, evolution, and ecology.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    BIOL 14000 - Marine Biology


    Introduction to the science of marine biology. Topics include a coverage of the following marine groups: plant, invertebrates and vertebrates. Additional lecture are provided in marine ecosystems, oceanography and marine resources. Includes a field trip to a marine biological station in Costa Rica.

    Preparation for Course
    P: BIOL 10000 or Equivalent. Consent of instructor required.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab 2.
    Notes
    Field trip costs are the responsibility of the student.
    Available as a free elective. Cannot be used to satisfy Group A or B elective requirements for biology majors.
  
  •  

    BIOL 18300 - Professional Practice I


    This course serves to integrate a professional research experience at an approved academic institution or industrial research facility into the Biology academic curriculum. The student must be accepted into an internship or co-op program. To participate in the Co-op program a student also must be accepted by the cooperative education program coordinator of Purdue University. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: Departmental approval required.

    Cr. 0-3.
    Notes
    The student must be accepted into an internship or co-op program.
  
  •  

    BIOL 19500 - Special Assignments


    Reading, discussions, written reports, seminar presentations, and field or laboratory work provided for enrichment in special areas of the biological sciences.

    Preparation for Course
    Consent of instructor required.

    Cr. 0-18.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  •  

    BIOL 20300 - Human Anatomy And Physiology


    A survey of normal structure and function of the human organism. The human is treated as an open system with the capacity to transport material, transform energy, and maintain a homeostatic state. The capacities and limitations of the human to cope with changes in the environment are emphasized. All major systems of the human body and their functions are examined in relation to the living organism. Integrated into the study of the human organism are laboratory exercises that emphasize the essentials of human anatomy and physiology.

    Preparation for Course
    P: One Year High School Biology and/or One Year High School Chemistry or Equivalent.

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab. 2.
    Notes
    Not available for credit toward graduation for majors in the Department of Biological Sciences.
  
  •  

    BIOL 20400 - Human Anatomy And Physiology


    Continuation Of BIOL 20300.

    Preparation for Course
    P: BIOL 20300

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab. 2.
    Notes
    Not available for credit toward graduation for majors in the Department of Biological Sciences.
  
  •  

    BIOL 21500 - Basic Human Anatomy


    Introduction to anatomy using cadavers and anatomical models for investigations. Emphasis is given to the interrelationships of bones, muscles, nerves, and blood vessels from a regional approach. Specifically designed for students for whom BIOL 20300 and BIOL 20400 is not accepted.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Placement at or above MA 15300 (or Equivalent) and BIOL 10900 or 11900 or consent of Instructor.

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab. 4.
    Notes
    Specifically designed for students for whom BIOL 20300 and BIOL 20400 is not accepted.
  
  •  

    BIOL 21600 - Basic Mammalian Physiology


    Introduction to physiology emphasizing homeostasis and interrelationships of body functions, cells to systems. Includes selected functional anatomy.

    Preparation for Course
    P: One Semester of Chemistry. R: BIOL 21500.

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab. 3.
    Notes
    Specifically designed for students in IU Allied Health programs, nursing, and physical education for whom BIOL 20300 and BIOL 20400 is not accepted.
  
  •  

    BIOL 21700 - Intermediate Ecology


    Ecological principles of populations, communities, and ecosystems; interaction of biotic and abiotic factors regulating population and community structure; case studies, field studies, and simulation models of life history attributes, competition, predation, parasitism, and mutualism. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: BIOL 11700 and 11900 or Equivalent with Grades of C- or better.

    Consent of instructor if non-biology major. 

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab. 3.
    Notes
    This course is open only to biology-related science majors. Consent of instructor required for non-biology majors.

  
  •  

    BIOL 21800 - Genetics And Molecular Biology


    The course will cover the principles of classical and molecular genetics. Mendelian inheritance, linkage, gene interaction and chromosomal aberrations, nucleic acids structure, gene function (replication, transcription, and translation), mutation and repair, regulation of gene expression, genetic engineering. The laboratory experiments include linkage mapping in Drosophila, allozyme variation in fish, DNA extraction, electrophoresis, restriction enzyme analysis, gene isolation by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). 

    Preparation for Course
    P: BIOL 11700 And BIOL 11900 with grades of C- or better and CHM 11600 or consent of instructor. 

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab. 3.
    Notes
    This course is open only to biology-related science majors. Instructor permission required for non-biology majors.
  
  •  

    BIOL 21900 - Principles Of Functional Biology


    This course will cover selected topics in both plant and animal physiology: photosynthesis, respiration, nutrition, solute and water transport, plant and animal hormones, neural control in animals, osmoregulation, and reproduction. Some laboratory time will be devoted to small-group discussions. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: BIOL 11700 And 11900 with grades of C- or better and CHM 11600 or consent of instructor. 

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab. 3.
    Notes
    This course is open only to biology-related science majors. Instructor permission required for non-biology majors.
  
  •  

    BIOL 22000 - Microbiology For Allied Health Professionals


    The biology of microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, and algae) and their interactions with humans. Emphasis on microbes with medical and/or public health significance. Specific areas of study include characteristics, metabolism, and genetics of bacteria; host-parasite interactions; factors affecting human health and disease states; principles of disinfection and sterilization; epidemiology of infectious disease with emphasis on transmission, prevention, and treatment; and nosocomial infection risks and prevention.

    Preparation for Course
    P: BIOL 20300.

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab. 2.
    Notes
    This course is designed for Nursing and Allied Health students.
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  •  

    BIOL 28400 - Professional Practice III


    This course serves to integrate a professional research experience at an approved academic institution or industrial research facility into the Biology academic curriculum. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: Departmental approval required.

    Cr. 0.
    Notes
    The student must be accepted into an internship or co-op program.
  
  •  

    BIOL 29500 - Special Assignments


    Reading, discussions, written reports, or laboratory work selected for enrichment in special areas of the biological sciences.

    Preparation for Course
    Instructor approval required.

    Cr. 0-18.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Student arranges hours and credit with instructor.
  
  •  

    BIOL 31700 - Addiction: Biology, Psychology, And Society


    This is an interdisciplinary, introduction course taught by a team from the Biology and Psychology Departments. The course will focus on using the processes of addiction to alcohol, marijuana, nicotine, and psychomotor stimulants to teach the basics of biological and psychological science. Example topic areas include neurological/brain function, impact on cognitive function, biochemistry, genetics, immunology, emotion, and motivation, learning and memory, physiology and pharmacology, and the psychosocial aspects of addictions.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Placement at or above ENGL 13100.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Cannot be used as A or B elective for biology majors.
  
  •  

    BIOL 32401 - Antibiotic Discovery


    Using an authentic research project, students will gain skills in the process of scientific inquiry, including hypothesis generation and testing, and in common procedures of microbial culture and characterization. Students enrolled in the course will be part of a national student crowd sourcing initiative to identify novel antibiotics and increased microbial resistance. Students will report their findings with peer feedback.

    Preparation for Course
    P: BIOL 11700 and 11900 with grades or C- or better (or equivalent), and biology major.

    P or C: CHM 11600.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab 1.
    Notes
    Lab fees assessed.

  
  •  

    BIOL 32700 - Biology Of Aging


    This course presents a basic understanding of how the human body ages from the biological standpoint. The student will gain an understanding of biological and physiological changes associated with aging in various organ systems. Discussions of potential intervention strategies and ways to extend the quality of life during aging will be presented. The course is primarily geared toward the student interested in obtaining a certificate in gerontology.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    This course meets General Education Level B4 requirements.
    This course cannot be used as a group A or B elective for biology majors.
  
  •  

    BIOL 33400 - Clinical Pathophysiology


    A functional study of pathophysiology of major physiological systems of a human with special emphasis on clinical applications for baccalaureate nursing and allied health professionals. Major topics to be covered include fluid and electrolyte balance, medical genetics, and the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, hepatic, endocrine, immune, renal, and neural systems.

    Preparation for Course
    P: BIOL 20300 and 20400, or equivalent.

    Cr. 4.
    Notes
    Cannot be used as a group A or B elective  for biology majors.
  
  •  

    BIOL 33500 - Animal Behavior


    Instinct vs. learning; genetics and development of learning; neurobiology; behavioral ecology: habitat selection, mating systems, foraging behavior; sociobiology and human behavior.

    Preparation for Course
    P: BIOL 11700 and 11900, or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    BIOL 34500 - Vertebrate Biology


    Vertebrate diversity and the manner in which species are designed for their particular lifestyles, the relatedness and origins of the major vertebrate taxa, the basic vertebrate body plan, adaptations for feeding and locomotion, natural history of selected vertebrates, current conservation issues regarding vertebrates. Field experiences will include periodic visits to local nature preserves during the lab period. This course includes service-learning. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: BIOL 11700 and BIOL 11900.

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab. 3.
  
  •  

    BIOL 34900 - Environmental Science


    Examines current major environmental issues through an investigation of the scientific and political aspects of human population growth, degradation of natural resources, and environmental regulations.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Junior or Senior Class Standing.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Cannot be used as a Group A or B elective for biology majors.
  
  •  

    BIOL 35000 - Introduction To Plant Physiology


    Basic physiological processes and their relationship to plant structure and function. Laboratory experiments provide personal experience with a broad range of psychological phenomena.

    Preparation for Course
    P: BIOL 10800 and One Semester of General Chemistry.

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab. 3.
  
  •  

    BIOL 38100 - Cell Biology


    Details of cell structure and function, biochemical aspects of energy and information flow in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, cellular differentiation and function of specialized eukaryotic cells. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: BIOL 11900 or consent of Instructor. R: One Semester of Organic Chemistry.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Course open only to science majors. Non-biology majors will need the consent of the instructor to register.
  
  •  

    BIOL 38200 - Lab In Cell Biology


    Experimental methods in cell biology with emphasis on biochemical methods for exploring cell structure and function. Cell division and differentiation will also be addressed.

    Preparation for Course
    P: BIOL 38100.

    Cr. 1.
  
  •  

    BIOL 38600 - Professional Practice IV


    This course serves to integrate a professional research experience at an approved academic institution or industrial research facility into the Biology academic curriculum. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: Departmental approval required.

    Cr. 0.
    Notes
    The student must be accepted into an internship or co-op program.
  
  •  

    BIOL 40600 - Human Anatomy


    This human anatomy course is designed for preprofessional healthcare students who are applying to predoctoral and graduate programs, such as medical school, dental school, pharmacy, physical therapy, physician assistant, and occupational therapy. Lecture includes comprehensive instruction of the human anatomical systems, including histology and embryology. Laboratory instruction includes histology, cadaver software, and anatomical models from a regional approach. Specifically designed where lower levels A&P courses e.g. BIOL 20300 and BIOL 20400 are not accepted.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  BIOL 21900 and CHM 11500 with grades of C- or better and junior or senior class standing. Instructor approval required.

    Cr. 4.
    Notes
    $50 standard lab fee.
  
  •  

    BIOL 40900 - Human Physiology


    This human physiology course is designed for preprofessional healthcare students who are applying to predoctoral and graduate programs, such as medical school, dental school, pharmacy, physical therapy, physician assistant, and occupational therapy. Lecture includes problem-based learning (PBL) activities to provide the student with multiple experiences analyzing comprehensive patient clinical case studies. Laboratory instruction includes analyzing human anatomical and physiological systems by conducting experimental simulations. Specifically designed where lower levels A&P courses e.g. BIOL 20300 and BIOL 20400 are not accepted.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  BIOL 40600 with grade of C- or better and junior or senior class standing. Instructor approval required.

    Cr. 4.
    Notes
    $50 standard lab fee.
  
  •  

    BIOL 43400 - Marine Community Ecology


    Lecture involves a survey emphasizing tropical marine communities including coral reefs, mangrove estuaries, turtle grass, and hard and soft substrate intertidal communities. Community processes such as predation, competition, mutualism, zonation, and behavior are discussed as well as physical-chemical factors such as tides, currents, waves, and salinity. Course includes a required field trip to a marine biological station over spring break for the lab portion. Student required to pay for expenses associated with field trip. Prerequisite for field trip: swimming/snorkeling ability; use of scuba gear is optional.

    Preparation for Course
    P: One year of College Biology; Second Semester may be taken Concurrently.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab. 1.
 

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