May 25, 2024  
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order.

Standard information for each course includes the number, title, and credits (sometimes called credit hours or semester hours). For some courses, you will find information on the hours of class, laboratory, or studio for which the course is scheduled in each week of a regular semester; these weekly hours are expanded during summer sessions. Fees for courses are assessed on the basis of credits and other factors.

The course-numbering system generally suggests levels of difficulty and appropriateness. Courses at the 100 and 200 levels comprise introductory offerings and those are most commonly taken by freshmen and sophomores. Courses at the 300 and 400 levels are primarily for juniors and seniors. In some Purdue programs, undergraduates take courses at the 500 level, but generally courses numbered 500 and above are for graduate students.

Preparation for courses is indicated as follows:

P: indicates a prerequisite that must precede your enrollment in the course described. You may find one or more specific course numbers, the number of credits you should already have in a subject, a placement-test level, or other conditions.

C: indicates a corequisite that must be taken no later than the same semester in which you take the course described.

R: indicates a recommendation concerning conditions to be met for enrollment in the course.

When no subject code is shown for prerequisites, corequisites, and recommended courses, they are in the same subject area as the course being described. If you lack a prerequisite or corequisite, or if you wish to take a course numbered at a higher level than your present status, you should seek the department’s or instructor’s consent to enroll in the course.

V.T. means Variable Title and is shown for courses for which the title may be changed to specify the topic or other special focus of each offering.

Purdue University Fort Wayne reserves the right to add, withdraw, or change courses without notice.

 

 
  
  • CS 46700 - Project Management


    Covers the techniques required to manage systems development. Topics include project proposal, planning, estimating, organizing, controlling, and completion. Students practice these techniques on a major project using project management software.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS majors with Senior Class Stading.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CS 47200 - Operating Systems Design


    The design and implementation of modern multiprocessing operating systems. Topics include concurrent programming, real and virtual storage allocation, resource allocation and deadlock prevention and avoidance, job scheduling, and analytic modeling. Students will complete projects involving concurrency and implement a portion of a multiprocessing operating system.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 23200 and 27100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CS 47400 - Compiler Construction


    Techniques for the syntax-directed translation of modern high-level languages. Topics include grammars and language specification, language design issues, lexical analysis, LL and LR parsing techniques, semantics, symbol table design, code generation, and local optimization. Students are required to implement a compiler for a subset of a structured high-level language such as Pascal or Ada.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 35000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CS 48600 - Analysis Of Algorithms


    Techniques for analyzing the time and space requirements of algorithms and problems. Application of these techniques to sorting, searching, pattern-matching, graph problems, and other selected problems. Brief introduction to the intractable (NP-hard) problems.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 26000 and MA 16600.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CS 48800 - Theory Of Computation


    Mathematical models of computation including finite and pushdown automata and Turing machines and equivalence of different general-purpose models. Grammars and their relation to automata, Church’s Thesis, and limits of computation.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 35000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CS 49200 - Topics In Computer Science


    Seminar addressing current topics or issues in computer science or information systems.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CS 49400 - Directed Study


    Independent study for students who desire to execute a complete computer-oriented project. 

    Preparation for Course
    C: Junior or Senior Class Standing Required.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Notes
    Course may be repeated for credit up to 6 hours toward graduation.
  
  • CS 49500 - Cooperative Experience


    For Cooperative Education students only. 

    Preparation for Course
    Department Permission Required.

    Cr. 0-3.
  
  • CS 50300 - Operating Systems


    Basic principles of operating systems: addressing modes, indexing, relative addressing, indirect addressing, stack maintenance; implementation of multitask systems; control and coordination of tasks, deadlocks, synchronization, mutual exclusion; storage management, segmentation, paging virtual memory; protection, sharing, access control; file systems; resource management; evaluation and prediction of performance. Students are expedited to spend at least three hours per week gaining hands-on experience in using and modifying a small operating system.

    Preparation for Course
    Restricted to CS Majors (COMPSCI - MS Major or COMPSCI-NDG Major).

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CS 54300 - Introduction To Simulation And Modeling Of Computer Systems


    Simulation: discrete event simulation, process-oriented simulation, generating random numbers, simulation languages, simulation examples of complex systems. Nondeterministic models: random variables, Poisson process, moment generating functions, statistical inference and data analysis. Modeling: elementary queuing models, network of queues, applications to performance evaluation of computer systems.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 26000 and STAT 51100 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CS 57200 - Heuristic Problem Solving


    Design and development of heuristic problem-solving systems. The emphasis is on the development of general data representations, heuristics, and problem-solving strategies that can be applied to wide classes of problems. The task areas explored include game playing, theorem proving, pattern recognition, semantic information processing, cognitive psychology, design synthesis, robotology, and integrated artificial intelligence systems.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 26000 Or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CS 58000 - Algorithm Design, Analysis, And Implementation


    Basic techniques for designing and analyzing algorithms: dynamic programming, divide and conquer, balancing. Upper and lower bounds on time and space costs, worst case and expected cost measures. A selection of applications such as disjoint set union/find, graph algorithms, search trees, pattern matching. The polynomial complexity classes P, NP, and co-NP; intractable problems.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 48600 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CS 59000 - Topics In Computer Science


    Selected topics in computer science.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CSD 11500 - Introduction To Communicative Disorders


    Nature, symptoms, and causes of communicative disorders and the principal methods used for remediation.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CSD 12600 - Communication Sciences And Disorders Resource Seminar


    Provides new CSD majors with an overview of the degree and related professions. Topics will include clinic confidentiality policies, campus resources, study strategies, writing standards in CSD, and career paths.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Communication Sciences and Disorders major.

    Cr. 1.
  
  • CSD 18100 - First Course In American Sign Language


    Basic manual communication skill including the American manual alphabet, approximately 550 basic signs, and the history and place of manual communication in society. Designed to give the students minimum vocabulary and skills in communicating with individuals who are dependent on this form of communication.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CSD 18200 - Second Course In American Sign Language


    Development of conversational skills, vocabulary, and basic grammar of sign language.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CSD 18100 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CSD 28300 - Intermediate American Sign Language III


    This course is the third semester of intermediate level American Sign Language. This course builds on skills in the first year of ASL courses to develop more complex ASL grammatical features, vocabulary, short stories, narratives and dialogues. Included is an awareness for and information related to Deaf culture and local Deaf community.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CSD 18200 or by Placement Exam.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CSD 28400 - Intermediate American Sign Language IV


    This course is a fourth semester of American Sign Language designed to continue the development of expressive and receptive skills in ASL. Specifically, more advanced syntax, grammar and vocabulary will be used to develop and comprehend lengthier narratives. A variety of ASL literature will be studied to enhance awareness and knowledge of the Deaf culture and local Deaf community.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CSD 28300 with a Grade of C or Better or by Placement Exam.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CSD 30200 - Acoustic Bases Of Speech And Hearing


    The physical characteristics of speech sounds and the psychophysical processes involved in hearing.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CSD 30400 - Anatomy And Physiology Of The Speech And Hearing Mechanism


    The physical characteristics of speech sounds and the psychophysical processes involved in hearing.

    Preparation for Course
    P: BIOL 12600, BIOL 20300, BIOL 21500 or BIOL 32700, or Junior Standing.

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab. 2.
  
  • CSD 30600 - Introduction To Phonetics


    An introduction to articulatory phonetics, speech sounds in languages of the world, and principles and symbols of the International Phonetic Alphabet. Extensive practice in phonetic transcription.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 3.
  
  • CSD 30900 - Language Development


    Specific nature, sequence, and pattern of oral language development from birth through adolescence. Nature of language acquisition and approaches to the study of children’s language are presented. Linguistic and psychological explanations of the sequence of development are discussed.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CSD 32100 - Introduction To Phonological Disorders In Children


    An introduction to phonological and phonemic development and disorders of speech sounds in children. Basic methods of assessment and intervention for phonological errors are discussed.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CSD 11500 and CSD 30600.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CSD 39900 - Directed Study In Audiology And Speech Sciences


    Special projects such as directed readings, independent and/or cooperative research on professionally relevant topics under the guidance of an CSD faculty member.

    Cr. 1-3.
  
  • CSD 40400 - Neural Bases Of Speech, Language, And Hearing


    Neuroanatomical and neurophysiological bases of speech, language, hearing, sensory, and motor function. Special emphasis given to brain behavior correlates and behavioral consequences to speech, language, and hearing as a result of neurological injury or disease.

    Preparation for Course
    P. CSD 30400.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Junior/ Senior Standing
  
  • CSD 40500 - Augmentative And Computer Applications In Speech And Language


    An introductory overview with emphasis on potential application in assessment, treatment, research, and administrative functions related to communication disorders.

    Preparation for Course
    P: One Disorders Course (e.g., CSD 42000, CSD 43000, or CSD 32100).

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CSD 40600 - Field Experience In Augmentative/Alternative Communication


    A senior level capstone experience designed to give the student an opportunity to participate in a class/event that incorporates knowledge and skills developed in the Communication Sciences and Disorders curriculum.  By identifying prejudices concerning individuals who have severe communication disabilities, the student will develop skills to improve social exchanges.  Students will develop and participate in a hands-on experience for people who use augmentative/alternative communication devices.  Students will critique the experience and discuss what they learned.

    Preparation for Course
    P or C: CSD 40500. Restricted to CSD majors only. Departmental approval required.

    Cr. 1.
  
  • CSD 41600 - Introduction To Assessment Of Communication Disorders


    An introduction to the basic principles of assessment as it applies across the age and disorder spectrum. Specific assessment tools and tests are discussed and practiced.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CSD 11500, CSD 30400, CSD 30600 and CSD 30900.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CSD 41900 - Special Topics In Audiology And Speech Pathology


    Study of special topics, drawn from areas not covered in permanent courses. Topics may vary from semester to semester.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Departmental approval required.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit with different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  • CSD 42000 - Introduction To Developmental Speech And Language Disorders


    Introduction to disorders of speech and language in children. Characteristics of these disorders, methods of evaluation, and intervention procedures are discussed.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CSD 11500, CSD 30600, and CSD 30900.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CSD 43000 - Speech-Language Disorders In Healthcare Settings


    Presents speech-language disorders across the lifespan encountered in a variety of healthcare settings. Discusses the etiology, evaluation, and management of these disorders. Addresses administrative structures, team approaches, and reimbursement issues in healthcare settings.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CSD 41600.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CSD 44400 - Introduction To Research In Communication Sciences And Disorders


    This course will provide an introduction to fundamental concepts of research in the basic and clinical aspects of speech, language and hearing processes. Among topics to be covered will be research design and strategies, model and theory development, research ethics, and concepts related to data collection, interpretation, and statistical analysis.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CSD 11500 and one of PSY 20100, STAT 12500 or STAT 30100, with a grade of C- or better.

    Recommended: ENGL 23301.

    Cr. 3.

  
  • CSD 44900 - Introduction To Clinical Practice In Speech-Language Pathology


    The first in a series of practicum courses designed to provide instruction and practical experience in basic diagnostic procedures and therapeutic approaches to speech and language disorders.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CSD 11500, CSD 30400, CSD 30600, CSD 30900 and Junior Standing.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2-4.
  
  • CSD 45900 - Clinical Practicum In Speech-Language Pathology


    Undergraduate level practicum course designed to provide instruction and practical experience in fundamental diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to speech and language disorders. 

    Preparation for Course
    P. CSD 44900.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Permission of instructor required.
  
  • CSD 46000 - Introduction To Assessment Audiology


    Authorized equivalent courses or consent of instructor may be used in satisfying course prerequisites. History of audiology, normal and abnormal processes of hearing, basic methods of audiological assessment, and introduction to the development and management of hearing-conservation programs.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CSD 30200 and CSD 30400 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • CSD 54900 - Clinical Practice In Speech/Language Pathology I


    The second in a series of practicum courses designed to provide instruction and practical experience in fundamental diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to speech and language disorders.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CSD 44900 and CSD 43000 or Equivalent required. Overall GPA of 3.5 or Better and Instructor Permission Required.

    Cr. 1-8.
    Hours
    Class 1, Lab. 1-8.
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit.
  
  • CSD 55000 - Aural Rehabilitation For Adults


    Theoretical and clinical implications associated with the rehabilitation of hearing loss in adults and geriatric adults. Discussion centers on a family-centered team approach, built upon the effective use of amplification and other assistive devices.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CSD 46000 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab. 2.
  
  • CSD 55100 - Aural Rehabilitation For Children


    An overview of the effects of hearing impairment on language, speech, academic, and psychosocial development. Topics also include communication modalities, and principles and current practices for assessment and intervention.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CSD 46000 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 3.
  
  • CSD 59000 - Directed Study Of Special Problems


    Preparation for Course
    P: Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 1-6.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit.
  
  • DANC 10100 - Modern Dance Technique I


    An introduction to the techniques and principles of modern dance.

    Cr. 2.
    Hours
    Class 1, Studio 2.
    Subject Area
    Dance
  
  • DANC 10200 - Ballet I


    This course provides a study of classical ballet for the beginner dancer. Classes are participatory, focusing on the development of proficiency in the execution of the classic ballet movement and vocabulary. The anatomical and scientific principles of dance technique along with musicality, phrasing, and movement dynamics will also be emphasized throughout the course. Students will be involved in barre, center, and across the floor work along with in class discussions, readings, and dance compositions to form a deeper understanding and appreciation of the art of dance.

    Cr. 2.
    Hours
    Class 1, Studio 2.
    Notes
    May be repeated for up to six credits.
    Subject Area
    Theatre
  
  • DANC 10300 - Jazz Dance I


    A study of jazz dance, including early jazz and musical comedy as well as contemporary styles. Emphasis on current locomotor jazz techniques.

    Cr. 2.
    Hours
    Class 1, Studio 2.
    Notes
    May be repeated for up to six credits. Credit may be granted by audition.
    Subject Area
    Theatre
  
  • DANC 12100 - Tap Dance I


    The emphasis in this course will be on learning basic steps and tap progressions. Class will include barre work, across the floor and center floor combinations. Graded technique will be incorporated to monitor progress.

    Cr. 2.
    Hours
    Class 1, Studio 2.
    Notes
    May be repeated for up to four credits. Credit may be granted by audition.
    Subject Area
    Theatre
  
  • DANC 13400 - The Study of Movement in Human Society


    Through the cross-cultural lens of dance anthropology, ethnology, aesthetics, and performance, we will study the mean dance holds for its community of participants as well as how it functions in a particular society.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    Theatre
  
  • DANC 13600 - Teaching Dance: Theories and Methods


    Introduce students to theories and practices of teaching dance and creative movement to a variety of populations in diverse settings.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    Theatre
  
  • DANC 20200 - Ballet II


     A continuation of the principles and techniques of classical ballet addressed in DANC 10200.

    Cr. 2.
    Hours
    Class 1, Studio 2.
    Subject Area
    Theatre
  
  • DANC 20300 - Jazz Dance II


    A continuation and refinement of the jazz dance concepts and movement vocabulary addressed in DANC 10300. 

    Cr. 2.
    Hours
    Class 1, Studio 2.
    Subject Area
    Theatre
  
  • DANC 22100 - Tap Dance II


    The emphasis in this course will be on building upon the basic steps and progressions achieved in beginning tap. Class will include barre work, across the floor and center combinations. As in Tap I, graded technique will be incorporated to monitor progress.

    Cr. 2.
    Hours
    Class 1, Studio 2.
    Notes
    Credit may be granted by audition.
    Subject Area
    Theatre
  
  • DANC 24000 - Dance Composition


    An introduction to the theory and practice of the principles and utilization of choreographic tools; movement exploration, manipulation of basic dance elements, development of movement themes, and application of compositional dance forms.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    Dance
  
  • DANC 25100 - Dance History


    This course is designed to expose students to dance as a fundamental form of human expression. Varied forms of dance will be analyzed and discussed within a sociological, cultural, and historical framework. The focus of this course is the development of Western theatrical dance from the birth of ballet in the Renaissance courts through the eclectic marriage of dance forms found in 20th century America. Throughout this course, students should develop an understanding of dance as an art form.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    Theatre
  
  • DANC 39000 - VT- Musical Theatre Dance I


    This course explores the fundamentals of various dance forms to improve body awareness/performance.

    Cr. 0 or 3.
    Subject Area
    Theatre
  
  • EALC 10100 - Elementary Chinese I


    Introduction to Chinese language, grammar, and sentence patterns. Emphasis on comprehension and oral expression. Stress will shift steadily from spoken to written language.

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 4, Lab. 0,
  
  • EALC 10101 - Elementary Japanese I


    An introductory, skills-oriented course emphasizing learning language in context. Development of listening and speaking in simple interactional situations, and controlled reading and writing skills.

    Cr. 4.
    Dual Level Course
    Undergraduate-Graduate
  
  • EALC 10200 - Elementary Chinese II


    Introduction to Chinese language, grammar, and sentence patterns. Emphasis on comprehension and oral expression. Stress will shift steadily from spoken to written language.

    Preparation for Course
    P: EALC 10100.

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 4, Lab. 1,
  
  • EALC 10201 - Elementary Japanese II


    This course is a continuation of EALC 10101. The goal of the course is for students to practice basic communcative skills in Japanese and to improve their overall skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing). 

    Preparation for Course
    P: EALC 10101.

    Cr. 4.
  
  • EALC 20101 - Second-Year Chinese I


    Both spoken and written aspects stressed.

    Preparation for Course
    P: EALC 10100 and EALC 10200 or Equivalent Proficiency.

    Cr. 3-4.
    Hours
    Class 3-4, Lab. 0.
  
  • EALC 20102 - Second Year Japanese I


    Continuation of emphasis on communicative skills. Increased attention to reading and writing skills.

    Preparation for Course
    P: EALC 10201.

    Cr. 2-4.
  
  • EALC 20201 - Second-Year Chinese II


    Both spoken and written aspects stressed.

    Preparation for Course
    P: EALC 10100 and EALC 10200 or Equivalent Proficiency.

    Cr. 3-4.
    Hours
    Class 3-4, Lab. 1.
  
  • EALC 20202 - Issues In East Asian Traditions And Ideas


    Survey and analysis of selected issues pertinent to changes in thought and religion of general import. Topics vary, but are generally on broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  • EALC 20203 - Second Year Japanese II


    Continuation of EALC 20102 with an emphasis on communicative skills. Increased attention to reading and writing skills.

    Preparation for Course
    P: EALC 20102.

    Cr. 2-4.
  
  • EALC 23100 - Japan: The Living Tradition


    An introduction to the patterns of Japanese culture: society, history, visual arts, literary masterpieces, performing arts and living religious traditons.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • EALC 27100 - Modern And Contemporary Japanese Culture


    Examination of a range of Japanese culture expressions of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, such as literature, theater, film, popular culture and their historical contexts.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • EALC 30100 - Third Year Japanese I


    Review of grammatical points acquired in the first and second year Japanese. More advanced level of speaking, reading, writing, and listening proficiency.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  EALC 20203 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3-4.
  
  • EALC 30200 - Third Year Japanese II


    Review of grammatical points acquired in the first and second year of Japanese. More advanced levels of speaking, reading, writing and listening proficiency.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  EALC 30100 (or equivalent). 

    Cr. 3-4.
  
  • EALC 33300 - Foreign Study In Japanese, 3rd Year


    Credit for foreign study in Japanese language when no specific equivalent is available among departmental offerings.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Departmental approval required.

    Cr. 2-10.
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 10 credit hours.
  
  • EALC 40100 - Fourth-Year Japanese I


    Emphasis on advanced reading skills.

    Preparation for Course
    P: EALC 30200 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
  
  • EALC 40200 - Fourth-Year Japanese II


    Continuation of EALC 40100.  To develop advanced skills in Japanese for speaking, reading and writing.

    Preparation for Course
    P: EALC 40100 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
  
  • EAPS 10001 - General Geology


    Survey of physical geology and introduction to historical geology. Elements of crystallography, mineralogy, petrology, geomorphology, seismology, structural geology, paleontology, historical geology, and plate tectonics. Optional Saturday field trip.  

    Cr. 3-5.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab 3.
    Notes
    Credit given for only one of the following: EAPS 10001, EAPS 10003 or EAPS 10300.
    Honors version is EAPS 10003.
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  • EAPS 10002 - General Geology Laboratory


    Laboratory studies to accompany 10001, 21000, GEOG 10700, or ASTR 10000. Study of crystals, minerals, rocks, fossils, and earth structures from hand specimens and models. Interpretation of landforms and earth history from topographic and geologic maps.

    Cr. 1-2.
    Hours
    Lab. 2-3,
  
  • EAPS 10300 - Earth Science: Materials And Processes


    Introduction to origin and classification of minerals and rocks. Relationships among rock types, rock structures, surficial geological processes of running water, sub-surface water, glaciation, wind, waves, tides, and landform evolution. Geologic time. Internal processes, vulcanism, plutonism. Plate tectonics. Two lectures and a laboratory each week.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab. 2.
    Notes
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course. Credit given for only one of the following: EAPS 10001, EAPS 10003 or EAPS 10300.
  
  • EAPS 10401 - Earth Science: Evolution Of The Earth


    History of geology. Principles of interpretation of earth history. Geologic age dating, correlation, facies analysis, study of geosynclines, and plate tectonics as applied to reconstructing geological events. History of plant and animal life.

    Preparation for Course
    R: EAPS 10001.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab. 2-3.
  
  • EAPS 11301 - Directed Study In Earth Science


    Field, laboratory, or library research in any area of the earth sciences.

    Preparation for Course
    C: One course in Geology, Geography, or Astronomy, and Permission of Instructor

    Cr. 1-2.
    Notes
    May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. 
  
  • EAPS 12100 - Origin And Evolution Of Mars And Rocky Planetary Bodies


    Our current understanding of Mars is derived from the study of meteorites, lunar samples, geology, space probes, and landed rovers. Geological processes that are operative on Earth are also operative on Mars and similar planetary bodies, but differing boundary conditions have generated distinct outcomes. These differences have implications for the likelihood of finding life on Mars.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • EAPS 21000 - Oceanography


    Introduction to the study of the oceans and marine processes. Topics include morphology of the ocean floor, life in the ocean, oceanic circulation, and submarine geology. Three lectures or two lectures with occasional laboratory-demonstration per week.

    Preparation for Course
    P: One College-level Science Course or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • EAPS 21100 - Introduction To Paleobiology


    Processes of fossilization; techniques of fossil preparation and methods of taxonomic description; principles of evolution and distribution of life forms; principles of paleoecology and biostratigraphy. One two-hour laboratory per week; one weekend field trip required for geology majors.

    Preparation for Course
    P: EAPS 10001 or EAPS 10401 or Equivalent, or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab. 2.
  
  • EAPS 22101 - Introductory Mineralogy


    Crystallography, symmetry, and the crystal classes of minerals. Structure and physical and chemical characteristics of selected mineral groups. Phase diagrams and interpretation of mineral assemblages. Identification of common and important minerals using physical properties and simple chemical tests.

    Preparation for Course
    P: EAPS 10001; C: CHM 11500 or equivalent, or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3-4.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab. 2.
  
  • EAPS 30000 - Environmental And Urban Geology


    Significance of regional and local geologic features and processes in land use. Use of geologic factors to reduce conflict in utilization of mineral and water resources and damage from geologic hazards. Field trips.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2-3, Lab. 0-2.
  
  • EAPS 30500 - Geologic Fundamentals In Earth Science


    Introductory course for advanced students. Earth materials, earth processes, geological principles. Emphasis on relationships between geology and other physical sciences.

    Cr. 3-5.
    Hours
    Class 2-3, Lab. 0-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  • EAPS 33100 - Principles Of Sedimentation


    Sediment-forming environments and the chemical and biological processes of sedimentation. Diagenetic processes of lithification. Emphasis on genetic interpretation of sediments and processes of carbonate sedimentation.

    Preparation for Course
    P: EAPS 10001 or 10401, and EAPS 21100 (or equivalents). P or C: EAPS 22201 (or equivalent). 

    Cr. 3 or 4.
  
  • EAPS 33400 - Principles Of Sedimentology And Stratigraphy


    Processes and factors influencing genesis of sedimentary strata: provenance, depositional environment, sedimentary facies, and paleoecology. Analytical techniques and application of principles of interpretation of stratigraphic record. Laboratory study of sediments, sedimentary rocks, and subsurface samples, logs, and seismic records.

    Preparation for Course
    P: EAPS 22201.

    Cr. 3-4.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab. 2.
  
  • EAPS 41000 - Undergraduate Research In Geology


    Field, laboratory, or theoretical research in selected problems in geology. This course (1 cr.) may be taken in conjunction with a 300- or 400- level geology course, for honors.

    Preparation for Course
    Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 1-2; 1-6 in Summer.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits toward degree.
  
  • EAPS 41400 - Principles Of Paleontology


    History of plant and animal life as related the evolving earth climate, oceanographic, and tectonic systems. Introduction to the scientific study of fossils: sampling and analysis contributing to understanding of taphonomy, evolution, paleobiogeography, paleoecology, functional morphology, and biostratigraphy. One two-hour laboratory per week; one weekend field trip required.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Additional $50 assessed for field trip expenses.
  
  • EAPS 42001 - Regional Geology Field Trip


    Field investigation of selected regions of North America for study of mineralogic, lithologic, stratigraphic, structural, paleontologic, geomorphological, or other geological relationships. Six to fifteen days in the field.

    Preparation for Course
    C: EAPS 10001 and Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 1-2.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  • EAPS 42500 - Scanning Electron Microscopy


    Theory and practice of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Some discussion of wavelength dispersive methods.

    Preparation for Course
    P: EAPS 22101 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 2-3.
  
  • EAPS 49001 - Undergraduate Seminar


    Reading and discussion of selected topics.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Five (5) Additional Courses in Geology or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 1-2.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for up to six credit hours.
  
  • EAPS 49900 - Honors Research In Geology


     Topics vary.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Approval of departmental honors advisor. 

    Cr. 1-12.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credit hours.
  
  • ECE 20100 - Linear Circuit Analysis I


    Volt-ampere characteristics for circuit elements; independent and dependent sources; Kirchhoff’s laws and circuit equations. Source transformations; Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems; superposition. Transient response of RC, RL, and RLC circuits. Sinusoidal steadystate and impedance, instantaneous and average power.

    Preparation for Course
    C: MA 26100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • ECE 20200 - Linear Circuit Analysis II


    Continuation of ECE 20100. Use of Laplace Transform techniques to analyze linear circuits with and without initial conditions. Characterization of circuits based upon, impedence, admittance, and transfer function parameters. Determination of frequency response via analysis of poles and zeros in the complex plane. Relationship between the transfer function and the impulse response of a circuit. Use of continuous time convolution to determine time domain responses. Proprieties and practical uses of resonant circuits and transformers. Input - output characterization of a circuit as a two-port. Low and high-pass filter design.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ECE 20100; C: MA 36300.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • ECE 20700 - Electronic Measurement Techniques


    Experimental exercises in the use of laboratory instruments, measurements, device characteristics, waveform analysis, frequency and transient response, and transistor circuits.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ECE 20100.

    Cr. 1.
    Hours
    Lab. 3.
  
  • ECE 20800 - Electronic Devices And Design Laboratory


    Laboratory experiments in the measurement of electronic device characteristics. Design of biasing networks, small signal amplifiers, and switching circuits.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ECE 20700 and ECE 25500.

    Cr. 1.
    Hours
    Lab. 3.
  
  • ECE 22900 - C/C++ Programming for Electrical and Computer Engineering


    An introductory course on the programming in C and fundamentals of object-oriented programming in C++, with emphasis on applications in electrical and computer engineering. Topics include files, structures, arrays, pointers, and the proper use of dynamic data structures. Introduction on object-oriented programming using C++ language is also included. Students are expected to design and test software programs to solve engineering problems.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  ENGR 12800 or equivalent course of computer programming.

    Cr. 4.
  
  • ECE 23000 - Engineering Data Analysis In Python


    This course introduces data analysis to engineering students through Python programming. Students learn Python programming and introductory data science topics. The topics include data sampling and estimation, classification, clustering and advanced data analysis approaches. Students will be able to use Python as the programming language to solve data science problems in their course and research work.

    Preparation for Course
    P. ENGR 12800 or equivalent course of computer programming.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • ECE 25500 - Introduction To Electronic Analysis And Design


    Diode, bipolar transistor, and FET circuit models for the design and analysis of electronic circuits. Single and multistage analysis and design; introduction to digital circuits. Computer-aided design calculations, amplifier operating point design, and frequency response of single and multistage amplifiers. High-frequency and low-frequency designs are emphasized.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ECE 20100.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 3.
  
  • ECE 27000 - Introduction To Digital System Design


    An introduction to digital system design and hardware engineering, with an emphasis on practical design techniques and circuit implementation.

    Preparation for Course
    C: ENGR 12800 or equivalent course of computer programming.

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab. 3,
  
  • ECE 29100 - Industrial Practice I


    For Cooperative Education students only.

    Cr. 0.
  
  • ECE 29200 - Industrial Practice II


    For Cooperative Education students only.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ECE 29100.

    Cr. 0.
  
  • ECE 29595 - Selected Topics In Electrical And Computer Engineering


    Topics vary. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: Departmental approval required.

    Cr. 1-5.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit.
  
  • ECE 30100 - Signals And Systems


    Description of deterministic signals through the use of Fourier series. Fourier and Z-transforms. Systems description treated by differential and difference equations including transform methods. Computation of system response to both continuous and discrete inputs.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ECE 20200.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • ECE 30200 - Probabilistic Methods In Electrical And Computer Engineering


     An introductory treatment including probability of events, discrete and continuous random variables, multiple random variables, sums of random variables and long-term averages, and elementary random processes. Applications involving uniform, Gaussian, exponential, geometric, and related random variables. Introduction to parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. Discussion of wide-sense stationary random processes, including correlation functions, spectral densities and the response of linear time invariant systems. Course examples are drawn from signal processing, wireless communications, system reliability, and data science. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: MA 36300; C: ECE 30100.

    Cr. 3.
 

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