Oct 07, 2022  
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order.

Standard information for each course includes the number, title, and credits (sometimes called credit hours or semester hours). For some courses, you will find information on the hours of class, laboratory, or studio for which the course is scheduled in each week of a regular semester; these weekly hours are expanded during summer sessions. Fees for courses are assessed on the basis of credits and other factors.

The course-numbering system generally suggests levels of difficulty and appropriateness. Courses at the 100 and 200 levels comprise introductory offerings and those are most commonly taken by freshmen and sophomores. Courses at the 300 and 400 levels are primarily for juniors and seniors. In some Purdue programs, undergraduates take courses at the 500 level, but generally courses numbered 500 and above are for graduate students.

Preparation for courses is indicated as follows:

P: indicates a prerequisite that must precede your enrollment in the course described. You may find one or more specific course numbers, the number of credits you should already have in a subject, a placement-test level, or other conditions.

C: indicates a corequisite that must be taken no later than the same semester in which you take the course described.

R: indicates a recommendation concerning conditions to be met for enrollment in the course.

When no subject code is shown for prerequisites, corequisites, and recommended courses, they are in the same subject area as the course being described. If you lack a prerequisite or corequisite, or if you wish to take a course numbered at a higher level than your present status, you should seek the department’s or instructor’s consent to enroll in the course.

V.T. means Variable Title and is shown for courses for which the title may be changed to specify the topic or other special focus of each offering.

Purdue University Fort Wayne reserves the right to add, withdraw, or change courses without notice.

 

 
  
  •  

    FR 20301 - Second-Year French I


    Intensive review of grammar, and development of vocabulary, reading, conversation, and writing skills. Reading and discussion of modern French fiction and nonfiction, some compositions. Weekly attendance in the audio laboratory is required. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 11201.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  •  

    FR 20401 - Second-Year French II


    Intensive review of grammar, and development of vocabulary, reading, conversation, and writing skills. Reading and discussion of modern French fiction and nonfiction, some composition. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 20301.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  •  

    FR 21301 - Second-Year French Composition


    This course integrates the four language skills into a structured approach to composition. Review of selected points of French grammar will be included. Weekly compositions will treat topics both creative and expository and increase in length as the semester progresses. Emphasis will be on correct usage, vocabulary building, stylistic control.

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 20301.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Students are encouraged to enroll in ILCS 30000 (required for French majors) concurrently with enrollment in their first 300-level French literature course.
  
  •  

    FR 30500 - Chefs-D’Oeuvre De La Literature Francaise I


    French literature, And Origins To 1789.

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 20401; FR 21301.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FR 30600 - Chefs-D’Oeuvre De La Literature Francaise II


    French literature, 1789 to present.

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 20401; FR 21301.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FR 31700 - French Language Skills I


    Advanced grammar, structures, composition, and conversation, conducted in French.

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 20401; FR 21301.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Required for teaching certification.
  
  •  

    FR 31800 - French Language Skills II


    Advanced grammar, structures, composition, and conversation, conducted in French.

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 20401; FR 21301.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Required for teaching certification.
  
  •  

    FR 32600 - French In The Business World


    Study of the language of business activities in France, with an introduction to the structure and functioning of various aspects of French economic life. Useful for students preparing for the proficiency examinations of the Chambre de Commerce de Paris.

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 20401 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FR 32900 - Phonetics And Pronunciation


    Combined lectures on problems of pronunciation and phonetic transcription, and oral practice sessions.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FR 33001 - Introduction To Translating French And English


    A comparative study of the style and grammar of both languages with focus on the difficulties involved in translating. Introduction to the various tools of the art of translation.

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 31700.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FR 33200 - Conversational Practice


    Three meetings per week plus optional listening comprehension and oral practice in the language laboratory.  Development of communicative and speaking skills.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  FR 20401 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FR 34000 - Introduction To Contemporary French Society


    This course will introduce students to various aspects of French culture and society. Through selected readings and films students will develop an understanding of the contemporary history, politics, and geography of France.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FR 35600 - Introduction To French Cinema


    This course presents a chronological survey of French films, genres, and directors, from the Lumiere brothers to the New Wave. It will introduce students to basic techniques of film analysis. The course is conducted in French.

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 31700 and FR 31800.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FR 43900 - La Grammaire Française


    Advanced study of French grammar to follow the intermediate courses FR 31700 and FR 31800. Particular attention will be paid to verbal tenses and modes, the passive voice, indefinite adjectives and pronouns, prepositions and prepositional phrases.

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 31700 or FR 31800, or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FR 44000 - Medieval And Renaissance French Literature


    In this course students will read and analyze French literary texts from the Middle Ages through the sixteenth century within a socio-historical context. Among others, texts by Marie de France, Chretien de Troyes, Beroul, Rabelais, Montaigne, Marguerite de Navarre, Ronsard, and Du Bellay will be studied.

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 30500 or FR 30600 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FR 44201 - La Poesie Francaise et Francophone


    Survey of French and francophone poetry from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. Madame de Stael, Balzac, Stendhal, and others.

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 30500 or FR 30600 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    PFW students with an appropriate command of French may apply for a year’s study, with full credit, in the IU program at the University of Provence; participation is not limited to French majors. For one semester or one summer of study abroad, there are French programs in Paris, Rennes, Rouen, and Quebec. For further information, consult the coordinator of overseas study programs, Office of International Programs.
  
  •  

    FR 44301 - 19th Century Novel I


    Mme. de Stael, Balzac, Stendhal, and others.

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 30500 or FR 30600 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FR 45001 - Colloquium In French Studies


    Emphasis on one topic, author, or genre.

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 30500 or FR 30600 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 2-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated with different topic for up to 9 credit hours.
  
  •  

    FR 45300 - Litterature Contemporaine I


    20th century French literature.

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 30500 or FR 30600 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FR 46000 - French Fiction In Film


    Involves reading the works of French fiction and studying them as works of literature, followed by the viewing of a film version of each work and the preparation of a comparative analysis of the two versions.

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 30500 and FR 30600.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FR 46300 - Civilisation Francaise I


    French civilization from medieval period through 17th century.

    Preparation for Course
    P: 6 credits in French at the 300-level or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FR 47400 - Theme ET Version


    Translation of selected passages, alternating between English and French, to teach students to write with precision and clarity in both languages. Discussion of theoretical works related to the art of translation.

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 31700 or FR 31800 or FR 33001.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FR 49501 - Individual Reading In French Literature


    Preparation for Course
    P: 6 credits of 400-level French courses and Permission of Department.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit with a different topic.
  
  •  

    FVS 10100 - Introduction to Film


    Nature of film technique and film language, analysis of specific films, major historical, theoretical, and critical developments in film and film study from the beginnings of cinema to the present.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Placement at or above ENGL 13100 (or Equivalent) and Exemption from or Completion of ENGL 15000.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2-4, Lab. 0-3.
  
  •  

    FVS 20100 - Survey Of Film History


    An overview of film history from its beginnings to the present, emphasizing major developments in narrative cinema.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 13100 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2-3, Lab. 0-1.
    Notes
    If you are required by placement examination to take ENGL 15000, it is recommended that you complete that requirement before enrolling in any film studies course.
  
  •  

    FVS 39000 - The Film And Society


    Film and politics; censorship; social influences of the cinema; rise of the film industry.

    Preparation for Course
    R: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2-4, Lab. 0-4.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    FVS 40202 - Genre Study In Film


    Topic varies: the evaluation of typical genres; problems of generic description or definition; themes, conventions, and iconography peculiar to given genres, etc.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2-4, Lab. 0-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    GEOG 10700 - Physical Systems Of The Environment


    Explores the physical processes of the Earth-its weather, climate, landforms, oceans, and ecosystems-and analyzes a range of environmental issues.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2-3, Lab. 0-2.
    Notes
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  •  

    GEOG 10900 - Weather and Climate


    What causes tornadoes, hurricanes, and other extreme weather? What is climate change and why is it occurring? Learn about weather, climate, and how they interact.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    GEOG 22000 - Global Climate Change


    This course examines Earth’s climate and the changes that have occurred in the past and are occurring in the 21st Century. It will cover the basics of Earth’s energy and carbon budgets, and the nature of the atmosphere and oceans. Evidence that the climate is now rapidly changing will be covered, both globally and locally, as well as the prospects for future changes. 

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    GEOG 23700 - Mapping Our World


    Mapping lets us visualize our world and see how patterns change across places. For example, we can analyze how a bike-share program changes commuting patterns, or how urban farming emerges in a transforming city. Students learn how to develop digital maps and interpret spatial processes while gaining valuable experience with GIS software.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    GEOG 31500 - Environmental Conservation


    This course deals with the environmental impact of global population growth, natural resources utilization, and pollution. Current problems relating to energy consumption, farming practices, water use, resource development and deforestation will be examined from geologic and ecological perspectives. Strategies designed to avert predicted global catastrophe will be examined to determine success potential. Class participation through debate is strongly encouraged. Students should be able to use the internet as a resource.

    Cr. 3-5.
  
  •  

    GER 11100 - Elementary German I


    Introduction to German language as well as to cultures of German-speaking countries. Emphasis on development of communicative competence in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    GER 11100 is a course for beginners. Students with two years of high school German must take GER 11201.
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  •  

    GER 11201 - Elementary German II


    Introduction to German language as well as to cultures of German-speaking countries. Emphasis on development of communicative competence in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

    Preparation for Course
    P: GER 11100.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  •  

    GER 20301 - Second-Year German I


    Intensive review of important structural problems and vocabulary primarily through the reading and discussion of modern German fiction and nonfiction.

    Preparation for Course
    P: GER 11201.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  •  

    GER 20401 - Second-Year German II


    Intensive review of important structural problems and vocabulary primarily through the reading and discussion of modern German fiction and nonfiction.

    Preparation for Course
    P: GER 20301.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  •  

    GER 30500 - Introduction To German Literature: Types


    Study of literary types (narrative, dramatic, lyric), with examples of each selected from two or more periods.

    Preparation for Course
    P: GER 20401.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  •  

    GER 30600 - Introduction To German Literature: Themes


    Study of major themes in German literature as represented in two or more periods.

    Preparation for Course
    P: GER 20401.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  •  

    GER 30701 - Selected Works Of Contemporary German Literature


    Works of such authors as Grass, Boll, Weiss, Frisch, and Bobrowski plus selected poems are read and discussed in German.

    Preparation for Course
    P: GER 20401.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Does not duplicate GER 30500 or GER 30600.
  
  •  

    GER 31100 - Tradition And Innovation In German Literature


    Major themes and ideas in prominent works of German literature (lyric, fiction, drama) in translation, selected from various historical periods. Conducted in English.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  •  

    GER 31500 - Business German


    Improvement of speaking, writing, listening, and reading skills. Concentration on the language of the German business world. Discussion, grammar, exercises, and letter writing. Conducted in German.

    Preparation for Course
    P: GER 20401 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    GER 31800 - German Language Skills I


    Composition, conversation, and diction; advanced grammar. Conducted in German.

    Preparation for Course
    P: GER 20401.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    GER 31900 - German Language Skills II


    Intensive work in conversation and composition based on readings in areas of current or topical interest with emphasis on contemporary Germany.

    Preparation for Course
    P: GER 20401.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    GER 32000 - Special Topics In German


    Tutorial for intensive study of German grammatical structures, literature or culture.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    GER 32500 - German For Teachers


    Intensive practice in conversation and diction, with individual corrective work. Use of the audio laboratory. Intended primarily for teachers but open to students who have completed GER 31800 and preferably also GER 31900.

    Preparation for Course
    P: GER 20401 and GER 31800; prefer also GER 31900.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    May be taken twice for maximum of 6 credits. Does not count toward master’s degree. Required for teaching certification.
  
  •  

    GER 36201 - Introduction To Contemporary Germany


    An overview of contemporary German civilization with attention to the other German-speaking countries. Political, economic, and social organization. Conducted in German.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Third-year German Language Proficiency or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    GER 36300 - Introduction To German Cultural History


    A survey of the cultural history of German-speaking countries, as well as contemporary civilization, with an emphasis on individual aspects of culture traced through several epochs.

    Preparation for Course
    P: third-year German language proficiency or consent of instructor.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Study Abroad: Purdue University students with an appropriate command of German may apply for a year’s study, with full credit, in the IU program at the University of Freiburg; participation is not limited to German majors. The fourth or fifth semester of German may be taken during six weeks of full-time study abroad in the summer in Graz, Austria. Semester programs are available in Munich and Freiburg. For further information, consult the coordinator of overseas study programs, Office of International Programs.
  
  •  

    GER 37100 - Special Topics In Germanic Studies


    Topics dealing with Germanic languages, literatures, and cultures. Conducted in English.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  •  

    GER 40400 - Deutsche Literatur: Seit Der Romantik


    Historical survey of major literary developments from young Germany to recent writing in German-speaking Europe.

    Preparation for Course
    P: 6 credits of GER 30500, GER 30600, or GER 30701.

    Cr. 3.
    Dual Level Course
    Eligible for graduate credit.
  
  •  

    GER 40501 - Goethe: Life And Works


    Extensive readings in Goethe’s poetry, drama and narrative fiction, including analysis of Faust. Special emphasis is placed on the relationship between the author’s life and his works.

    Preparation for Course
    P: 6 credits of GER 30500, GER 30600 or GER 30701.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    GER 41100 - Advanced German: Grammar


    Survey and practice of complex grammatical structures; systematic expansion of vocabulary. Discussion and writing based on current materials, such as newspapers, films, and radio programs.

    Preparation for Course
    P: 6 credits of 300-level courses in German or Permission of Department.

    Cr. 3.
    Dual Level Course
    Eligible for graduate credit, but not toward M.A.
  
  •  

    GER 41500 - Perspectives On German Literature


    Study of one aspect of German literature: formal, historical, political, psychological, etc. Relation to wider concerns in and outside of literature. Topic announced in the online Schedule of Classes. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Conducted in German.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Third year German Proficiency or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  •  

    GER 41800 - German Film And Popular Culture


    Study of German film and/or other manifestations of German popular culture (television, music, cabaret, Trivialliteratur of the twentieth century).

    Preparation for Course
    P: GER 30500 or GER 30600.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    GER 42200 - 19th Century German Literature


    Topics dealing with language, literature, and culture of any of the German-speaking countries, generally in the more recent historical periods. Course is taught in German.

    Preparation for Course
    P: 6 credits of GER 30500, GER 30600 or GER 30701.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours.
  
  •  

    GER 42500 - 20th Century German Literature


    Survey of major developments in the literature of the German-speaking countries since 1890. Moments of historical and cultural interest will be discussed as they are reflected in the literature. Writing of Hofmannsthal, Rilke, Thomas Mann, Kafka, Hesse, Brecht, and others.

    Preparation for Course
    P: 6 credits of GER 30500, GER 30600 or GER 30701.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    GER 45100 - Introduction To German Syntax


    The syntax of modern German, with a practical introduction to the methods of grammatical analysis. Conducted in German.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    GER 45200 - Senior Seminar


    Selected topics in German literature, language, and culture.

    Preparation for Course
    P: GER 31800, GER 30500, and FER 30600; or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    GER 46400 - German Culture And Society


    The interaction of social, intellectual, and artistic forces in German life in the last one to two centuries, stressing interdisciplinary aspects.

    Preparation for Course
    P: German Culture Course.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    GER 47000 - German Folklore


    Development of folklore studies in German. Methods of “Volkskunde.” Marchen, Sage, Volkslied, Schwanke.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Ability to Read German.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    GER 49500 - Individual Readings in Germanic Literatures


    Preparation for Course
    P: 6 credits of 400-level German and Permission of Department.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit with a different topic.
  
  •  

    GERN 23100 - Introduction To Gerontology


    This course is a survey of the field of gerontology, including basic theoretical, methodological, and factual content drawn from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Background material on the demographic, health, physiological, psychological, and social aspects of aging is provided. Structured opportunities for practical field observation and experience with the aged are included.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    GERN 49400 - Gerontology Practicum


    Field experience in a setting involving adults 60 years or older, according to the interests and objectives of each student. Work will be supervised by the instructor and setting personnel. Provides an opportunity to apply gerontological theory and findings in a practical context.

    Preparation for Course
    P: GERN 23100.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Instructor approval required.
  
  •  

    GERN 49900 - Topics In Gerontology


    Specific topics announced each semester the course is offered. Examples of course content include legal and economic aspects of aging; health issues in aging; and business and marketing issues and older adults.

    Preparation for Course
    P: GERN 23100.

    Cr. 1-6.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    HIST 10001 - Issues in African History


    Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. 

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.
  
  •  

    HIST 10501 - American History I


    Colonial period, revolution, Confederation and Constitution, National period to 1877.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  •  

    HIST 10601 - American History II


    1877 to present. Political history forms framework with economic, social, cultural, and intellectual history interwoven. Introductions to historical literature, source material, and criticism.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    HIST 10501 is not a prerequisite for HIST 10601.
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  •  

    HIST 11300 - Western Civilization To 1500


    Ancient civilization, Germanic Europe, feudalism, medieval church, national monarchies, Renaissance.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Approved by College of Science for the western tradition culture studies requirement.
  
  •  

    HIST 11400 - Western Civilization Since 1500


    Reformation, Age of Louis XIV, French Revolution, Napoleonic Era, Revolutions of 1848, liberalism, socialism, nationalism, international rivalries, World War I, Russian revolutions, Nazi Germany, World War II, Cold War.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    HIST 11300 is not a prerequisite for HIST 11400.
    Approved by College of Science for the western tradition culture studies requirement.
  
  •  

    HIST 12500 - Great Debates: Introduction To Historical Communication


    Understanding effective oral communication is a vital part of the historian’s job. This course uses great debates from history as a starting point for teaching students about best oral communication practices. Students will deliver informational and argumentative speeches and will consider the best means of receiving and interpreting oral messages.

    Preparation for Course
    P: History major, or consent of instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    HIST 20101 - History Of Russia I


    From earliest times to the present era. Political, economic, social, and cultural topics, as well as Russia’s relations with other countries. Mongol conquest, Westernization, industrialization, Russian revolutions, and Stalin’s purges: literature and art in historical context. 

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by College of Science for the nonwestern culture studies requirement.
    Subject Area
    [OW] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 20500 - Ancient Civilization


    From birth of civilization in Mesopotamia and Egypt until Constantine’s conversion to Christianity (337 A.D.). Role of the city in ancient world; nature of imperialism; and impact of Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar, and other charismatic leaders. Archaeology as a source for political and social history.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [WE] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 21700 - Historical Methods


    This course provides students with an introduction to the foundational methods of historical inquiry, including the research process, analysis of primary and secondary sources, and the conventions of historical writing. The capstone project for the course will be a substantive research paper through which students will demonstrate their understanding of these historical methods. The course also helps students take the first steps of professional development as historians through the creation of a curriculum vitae and a personal statement. History majors should take this course before they take any research- or writing-intensive 300-level History courses.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 13100 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Restricted to students majoring in history (BA degree program) or consent of instructor for non-history majors.
  
  •  

    HIST 22000 - American Military History


    From settlement of colonies to present. European background, colonial militia, Indian fighting. Principal foreign wars and their strategic objectives. Technological changes and effect of military on American society. Army is emphasized, with some attention to Navy, Marines, and Air Force.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [HIUS] - History Major United States
  
  •  

    HIST 22200 - Renaissance And Reformation


    Society and civilization in the 15th and 16th centuries. Transition from medieval to modern life in political and economic behavior, culture, theology, and religion, discoveries and expansion.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [OW] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 22500 - Special Topics In History


    Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general importance. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects which cut across fields, regions, and periods.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated once for credit with a different topic for a maximum of six credit hours.
  
  •  

    HIST 22801 - The Vietnam War


    Indochina; French colonialism; French-Indochina War; Cold War dynamics; U.S. entry; military-political actions 1961-1975; domestic U.S. politics; U.S. disengagement; Indochinese and American legacies.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [OW] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 23200 - World In The 20th Century


    Shaping of the contemporary world with an emphasis on the reaction of nonwestern peoples to Western imperialism.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 13100 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by College of Science for the nonwestern culture studies requirement.
  
  •  

    HIST 23400 - Witchcraft And Witch Hunts c. 1400-1750


    In early modern Europe, roughly 100,000 people (predominantly women) were put on trial for witchcraft. About half this number were executed. This course seeks to understand how and why these horrific events occurred at this particular time and why more trials occurred in particular areas of Europe. Using thematic and geographical approaches, we will investigate the ancient and medieval roots of these witch hunts, and look in detail at the trials and executions of the accused, using trial records, anti-witch tracts from Church officials and other primary sources, as well as secondary sources from a wide range of modern authors. We will also pay special attention to the role that gender played in the witch hunts, looking at the various ways in which women were targeted during this period, and the roles gender may have played in witchcraft accusations. In addition to examining canonical works on witchcraft and witch trials, we will read some feminist interpretations of the witch hunts by historians and scholars from other disciplines. The course will also look into how ideas about witches crossed the Atlantic, using Salem as way to examine similarities and differences with the European “witch craze.” Students will also have an opportunity to examine how witches and witch hunts have been portrayed in popular culture, from 17th century English plays to modern films and television. Overall, students in this course will seek to understand why the “witch craze” occurred, and what short- and long-term impact this phenomenon had on European and early American culture and society.

    Cr. 3.
  
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    HIST 24101 - Nationalism In The Modern World


    Nationalism in Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and Asia in the 19th and 20th centuries. Emphasis on features in history, religion, politics, imperialism, economics, language, and myths that have promoted nationalism. Comparison of individual national movements and their unique characteristics.

    Cr. 3.
  
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    HIST 26000 - History Of Women In The United States


    How have women’s lives changed from the colonial period to the 20th century? This introductory survey focuses on women’s historical roles in the workplace, the family and politics. Material will be drawn from legal, constitutional, political, social, demographic, economic, and religious history.

    Cr. 3.
  
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    HIST 30101 - Colonial America


    Social, cultural, economic, political, and religious developments in colonial America from first contacts between Native Americans and Europeans through the early eighteenth century. Special topics include colonization, migration, slavery, Atlantic trade, and representative government.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Subject Area
    [US] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
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    HIST 30201 - Revolutionary America


    Political, economic, religious, social, and cultural history of the American Revolution and the birth of the nation. Special topics cover the nature of the revolution, the experience and effects of the crisis on different members of society, including women, native peoples, and African-Americans, and the meanings of the American Revolution for contemporaries and their descendants.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Subject Area
    [US] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
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    HIST 30302 - United States, 1789-1865 I


    1789-1840. Growth of national political institutions from Washington to Jackson; international conflicts, War of 1812, territorial expansion; political, economic, intellectual, social foundations of age of common man; antebellum reform.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Eligible for graduate credit.
    Subject Area
    [US] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
    Dual Level Course
    Undergraduate-Graduate
  
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    HIST 30502 - The Cold War


    The Cold War is an upper division course that will examine one of the most critical eras in modern history. A time period that spanned roughly from 1945 to 1989, the Cold War was hailed as an epic battle between communism and capitalism. In reality, the Cold War was a more complex struggle over a broad range of issues - ideological, cultural, economic, and strategic. As each side tried to protect its own national interests and way of life, a cycle of distrust and animosity quickly formed that would shape U.S-Soviet relations for the next four decades. Some of the questions we will be examining: Why was there a Cold War? To what extent was it inevitable? How did the Cold War become “hot” (Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan, for example)? Who “won” the Cold War? What were the consequences of the Cold War?

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [HIUS] History Majors-United States, [HIWE] History Majors-Western Europe, [HIOW] History Majors-World
  
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    HIST 31001 - Survey Of American Indians I


    The Native American experience from pre-Columbian period through American Civil War. Lectures and readings will focus upon Native American cultural patterns and the Native American response to French, British, and American Indian policies.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by College of Science for the Cultural Studies (Non-Western) requirements.
    Subject Area
    [US] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
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    HIST 31002 - Russian Revolutions And Soviet Regime


    Causes and development of Russian revolutions and civil war; Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin; purges, terror, economic development, society, and arts under Stalin; struggle against Hitler; scope and limits of de-Stalinization under Khrushchev; minorities, dissent, and life in the Soviet Union.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [OW] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
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    HIST 31101 - Survey Of American Indians II


    Native American-White relations from Civil War through 1980s. Focus on Native American attempts to defend their homelands in American West, establishment of Indian reservations in late 19th century. Impact of the Sawes and Wheeler-Howard Acts, emergence of Native American church, urbanization of Native Americans in 20th century.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by College of Science for the Cultural Studies (Non-Western) requirement.
    Subject Area
    [US] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
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    HIST 31102 - Holocaust And Modern Genocides


    This course examines genocide in the 20th century: first state-sponsored mass murder, systematic murder of Jews in Europe during World War II, regional differences in implementation of genocidal policies, memory and commemoration, the political uses and abuses of the Holocaust, Genocide Convention and the international community.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [WE] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
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    HIST 31301 - Origins Of Modern America, 1865-1917


    Reconstruction, industrialism, immigration, urbanism, culture, foreign policy, progressivism, World War I.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Sophomore class standing or higher.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Eligible for graduate credit.
    Subject Area
    [US] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
    Dual Level Course
    Undergraduate-Graduate
  
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    HIST 31401 - The United States 1917-1945


    The 1920s, the Depression, New Deal, with interpretive readings in politics, diplomacy, economics, society, thought and literature of the period, World War II.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Sophomore class standing or higher.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Eligible for graduate credit.
    Subject Area
    [US] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
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    HIST 31402 - Europe From The New World To Napoleon


    This course provides an overview of European history from approximately 1600 through 1820, a time of considerable economic, social, and intellectual change. During this period, Europe moved from what historians now consider the “early modern era,” or the “Old Regime,” to the modern era. This process came about thanks to the economic boon Europe gained from its colonies in the New World, paired with the emergence of new theories of science and politics. The course looks at the period through the various lenses of society, economics, and culture, moving through the colonization of new lands, the intellectual movement known as the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, Napoleon, and the “Restoration” of Europe in the decade following.

    Cr. 3.
  
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    HIST 31501 - U.S. Since World War II


    World War II, Cold War, problems of contemporary America; economic, social, political, and diplomatic.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Sophomore class standing or higher.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Eligible for graduate credit.
    Subject Area
    [US] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
    Dual Level Course
    Undergraduate-Graduate
  
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    HIST 31801 - The American West


    Western expansion and development 1763-1900: economic, political, and social. Special attention to natural resources, Native American-Anglo American relations, and the role of the West in American myth and symbol.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Sophomore class standing or higher.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [US] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
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    HIST 32503 - Topics In History


    Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope from the perspective of the arts and humanities. Topics will vary but will usually cut across fields, regions, and periods.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit with a different topic for a maximum of 15 credits.
  
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    HIST 32701 - Modern France And The French Empire


    This course provides an introduction to the history of France and its empire over the course of the last 150 years.  It covers the most important political events that impacted France and her colonies since the end of the nineteenth century, as well as considering social, cultural, and intellectual movements that influenced the course of French and imperial history.  The course considers questions of identity, defining ‘Frenchness,’ over a contested period, and questioning what it meant to be a member of the greater French empire.  It examines what France meant to various groups and considers ideas of belonging and the nation, studying inclusion and exclusion, and the ramifications of maintaining and living in a global empire.  The course studies the complex relationship between colonized and colonizer from the viewpoints of both sides, considering both the political and emotional legacies of colonialism.

    Cr. 3.
  
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    HIST 33101 - African History From Ancient Times To Empires And City States


    Origins and groupings of peoples of Africa; political, social, and economic evolution to 1750; Africa’s contacts with ancient world, trans-Sahara and Indian Ocean trades, growth of states and empires, spread of Islam.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by College of Science for the nonwestern cultural studies requirement.
    Subject Area
    [OW] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
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    HIST 33201 - African History From Colonial Rule To Independence


    1750 to present. Slave trade, European imperialism; impact of Islam and Christianity, new state formations, reassertion of African culture and identity.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by College of Science for the Cultural Studies (Non-Western Culture) requirement.
    Subject Area
    [OW] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
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    HIST 33502 - American History Through Music


    This course uses developments within the American music industry to trace the larger development in United States history during the twentieth century. Turn-of-the-century ragtime becomes a lens through which to understand the cultural impact of the modern industrial economy. Surf music is a microcosm of post-war suburbanization. Motown reveals tensions between the business and civil rights communities. Led Zeppelin is treated as part of the fantastic escapism of the malaise of the 1970s. This is not a music history class per se, but rather a class that uses music to study history.

    Cr. 3.
  
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    HIST 33503 - Topics In Non-Western History


    Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in non-Western, Russian, and Latin American history from the perspective of the arts and humanities. Topics will vary.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit with different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours.
    Approved by College of Science for the Cultural Studies (Non-Western Culture) requirement.
    Subject Area
    [OW] - [US] United States [WE] Western Europe [OW] Other World
  
  •  

    HIST 33604 - France In World War I And World War II


    This class considers the history of French society, culture, and politics through participation in the First and Second World Wars. While WWI and WWII affected millions of people around the globe, France held a unique position in that in addition to the fighting, French civilians lived under harsh occupation in both world wars.  This course explores the French experiences during the two world wars, considering the war experience from diverse perspectives, including those of soldiers, civilians, men, women, collaborators, resisters, and France’s imperial subjects.  While the class is centered on the two world wars, it is not a military history course; rather, the course focuses on society and culture and how the war experiences shaped France, the French Empire, and its people.  Along with the war experience, students will consider the shifting view of war as it was being anticipated, fought, and remembered.

    Cr 3.
    Notes
    Course will typically be offered online.
 

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