Apr 20, 2024  
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order.

Standard information for each course includes the number, title, and credits (sometimes called credit hours or semester hours). For some courses, you will find information on the hours of class, laboratory, or studio for which the course is scheduled in each week of a regular semester; these weekly hours are expanded during summer sessions. Fees for courses are assessed on the basis of credits and other factors.

The course-numbering system generally suggests levels of difficulty and appropriateness. Courses at the 100 and 200 levels comprise introductory offerings and those are most commonly taken by freshmen and sophomores. Courses at the 300 and 400 levels are primarily for juniors and seniors. In some Purdue programs, undergraduates take courses at the 500 level, but generally courses numbered 500 and above are for graduate students.

Preparation for courses is indicated as follows:

P: indicates a prerequisite that must precede your enrollment in the course described. You may find one or more specific course numbers, the number of credits you should already have in a subject, a placement-test level, or other conditions.

C: indicates a corequisite that must be taken no later than the same semester in which you take the course described.

R: indicates a recommendation concerning conditions to be met for enrollment in the course.

When no subject code is shown for prerequisites, corequisites, and recommended courses, they are in the same subject area as the course being described. If you lack a prerequisite or corequisite, or if you wish to take a course numbered at a higher level than your present status, you should seek the department’s or instructor’s consent to enroll in the course.

V.T. means Variable Title and is shown for courses for which the title may be changed to specify the topic or other special focus of each offering.

Purdue University Fort Wayne reserves the right to add, withdraw, or change courses without notice.

 

 
  
  • HTM 23100 - Hospitality And Tourism Marketing


    This course teaches students a customer-oriented approach to marketing in hospitality and tourism. This course emphasizes the role of marketing in an organization’s overall strategic planning. Techniques available to hotels, restaurants, and other tourism businesses are described and evaluated including travel packaging, the travel trade, advertising, sales promotion, positioning and branding.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 10000 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • HTM 24200 - Managerial Accounting And Financial Management In Hospitality Operations


    Managerial and financial analysis of numerical data used for decision-making. Consideration of systems, techniques, information types and presentational forms used by hospitality management. Emphasis on situations oriented to the hospitality industry.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  HTM 14100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • HTM 25200 - Professional Development I


    This course is designed to help students begin their journey toward obtaining gainful employment upon graduation. Students will be familiarized with current and future industry needs as well as current employment opportunities. They will be guided in planning their studies and work experience towards meeting their goals. This course is also designed to help students choose the specialization track that suits their professional aspirations. This course will prepare students for academic success by introducing selected learning and thinking tools.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  HTM 10000.

    Cr. 2.
  
  • HTM 30100 - Hospitality And Tourism Industry Practice


    Training and practical experience at the entry level, totaling at least 300 hours in an approved hospitality or tourism operation.

    Preparation for Course
    P: 6 credits in HTM or consent of Program Coordinator.

    Cr. 1.
  
  • HTM 30200 - Hospitality And Tourism Industry Internship


    This course is a supervised and structured industry internship experience. Students are required to obtain a signed internship learning agreement with an employer prior to starting the internship. The internship consists of rotations through at least 3 functional areas. Students are also required to prepare comprehensive written management reports reflecting upon their internship experience and present employer evaluation. Variable credits with a minimum of 320 work hours needed for each credit hour or 640 for two credit hours.

    Cr. 1 or 2.
    Notes
    Requires consent of Program Coordinator.
  
  • HTM 31000 - Food And Beverage Operation Management


    This course builds on the foundation skills gained in food preparation and accounting putting them in practice in a real world setting where students plan, operate and manage a full service restaurant open to the public. Emphasis is placed on developing and utilizing effective operational management skills to create a high quality, profitable operation with well-planned systems and highly motived, organized employees.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 21400 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab 3.
  
  • HTM 31200 - Human Resources Management For The Service Industries


    The principles and practices of managing human resources for effective operations of hospitality and tourism businesses will be covered including: Analysis and design of work, recruiting, selection, training and development, performance management, compensation, employee relations, and strategies for supporting organizational strategies.

    Preparation for Course
    P:10000 with grade of C- or better. 

    Cr. 3.
  
  • HTM 31500 - Club Management And Operations


    A study of the organization, administration, operation, and opportunities within the private club industry with emphasis on the manager’s duties.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 23100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • HTM 32200 - Hospitality Facilities Management


    Technical and managerial issues relating to the operation and maintenance of the physical plant and equipment in hospitality industry facilities.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 18100 and 19100 with grades of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • HTM 32400 - Distribution Management


    This course is intended to help undergraduate students gain fundamental knowledge about electronic distribution as it relates to the lodging industry.  The course covers a wide range of topics that are related to marketing, yield management, content distribution, payments, channel management, and networks in context of a rapidly changing landscape.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 18100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • HTM 33200 - Emerging Technology Trends


    This course covers the major aspects and impact of the digital age on the hospitality industry, from computer and network basics to the latest and applications. The focus is on how customer engagement technology is changing the guest-host relationship. Attention will focus on the areas of: e-commerce, social media, mobile devices and applications, the guest life-cycle.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  HTM 10000, 18100 and 21400.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • HTM 33400 - Introduction To Sports Event Management


    This course provides a basic understanding of the event management process as it relates to sporting events. Students will explore costs and revenue streams, marketing strategies, community and media partnerships, risk management, and contemporary issues for sporting events.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • HTM 33800 - Culinary Traditions Of Italy


    This 2-week study abroad course focuses on the culinary traditions of Italy. There will be a study of the cuisine including the history and culture surrounding the food. Where and how food is produced, marketed, prepared and consumed will be explored. The impact of the cuisine on health will be compared and contrasted with other cuisines. Regions in Italy for study may vary from year to year.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • HTM 34100 - Cost Controls In Foodservice And Lodging


    Application of cost controls; development of cost-reduction methods through management policy and decisions; examination of cost-control techniques for food, labor, and supplies in addition to the emphasis on beverage management control.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 14100 or BUS 20100 and HTM 24200 or BUS 20200 with grades of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • HTM 35000 - Professional Development II


    This course will allow students to take stock of their progress in the program and make realistic adjustments to their study plan. Students will develop their personal mission statement. They will reassess their goals and study plan while maintaining a steady and timely pathway to graduation. In addition, the course will address professional etiquette, attire and demeanor.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  HTM 10000, 18100, 21400, and 25200.

    Cr. 1.
  
  • HTM 37100 - Introduction To Tourism


    Principles, practices, and philosophies that affect the economic, social, cultural, psychological, and marketing aspects of human travel and the tourism industry.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 10000, HTM18100, and HTM 21400.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • HTM 37400 - Revenue Management


    Revenue management is widely used in the field of hospitality management to maximize revenue or profits from fixed and/or perishable resources such as event space, resort facilities or hotel rooms. Revenue management is a multidisciplinary process that blends elements of marketing, operations, and financial skills. This course will review a set of revenue maximization strategies and tactics that use rate, revenue streams, and distribution channel management to achieve the above mentions business objectives.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 10000, HTM 18100, and BUS 20100 or HTM 14100. Each class must be completed with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • HTM 37600 - Sustainable Tourism Development


    Students will study the effects of tourism on the local and ecological environment. They will gain understanding of ways to minimize the impact of tourism on the local environment while providing opportunities that directly benefit hosts and visitors as well as the environment. This course will also explore current trends in the travel market in terms of perceptions and needs of the contemporary traveler asking the question whether ecotourism is itself a trend or the reflection of a more profound change in values that impact consumer behavior in the tourism industry.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 10000, and HTM 17300 or HTM 37100. Each class must be completed with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Special fees assessed.
  
  • HTM 37700 - Resort Property, Rental And Services Management


    Linking practice to theory, this course will allow students to participate fully in the operation of a resort to become familiar with all its services and activities. Particular attention will be paid on understanding the different revenue streams and their role in offering a total resort experience to the different market segments that are being attracted to the island resort. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 10000, 18100, 21400 and 37100.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Exp 3.
    Notes
    Departmental approval required.
  
  • HTM 37800 - Destination And Resort Marketing


    Destinations are emerging as a fundamental concept in the study of tourism development. Resorts are, in most cases, nested within destinations, their commercial destiny being therefore interdependent. This course will examine the challenges and opportunities associated with promoting resorts and destinations. Students will examine and compare strategies. They will also have opportunities to develop and apply some hands on marketing approaches.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 10000, 18100, 21400 and 37100. 

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Special fees assessed.
    Departmental approval required.
  
  • HTM 40800 - Hospitality Management Environmental Issues, Opportunities And Challenges


    This course introduces the student to the global sustainability trends, their impact on the hospitality industry, and responses to and opportunities associated with sustainability. The course attempts to portray a variety of viewpoints regarding issues of contemporary interest to society and the business community, particularly those in the hospitality industry. The current interest in sustainability within the hospitality industry is fueled by the consumers increased awareness and changes in the regulatory environment. These trends seriously influence strategic and operational management decision. Impact consumer behavior and directly affect profitability as well as growth in all sectors of the hospitality industry. A clear understanding of the issues surrounding environmental politics, private industry environmental impacts, and corporate social responsibility will help those in the hospitality industry enhance their reputation, obtain badly needed capital funds, and attract the best and brightest human resources. This is a trend that is not going away and understanding of basics of sustainability and the trends inherent in the industry will assist the student in the student’s career path in the hospitality industry

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 18100, HTM 21400,and NUTR 20400.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • HTM 41100 - Hospitality And Tourism Law


    Overview of the fundamental legal framework that governs the conduct of hospitality and tourism managers. Topics include civil rights, contracts, court procedures, ethics, and risk management.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • HTM 42000 - Event Management


    This course will review the field of event management, convention and association management. Emphasis will be put on the logistical requirements and economics impact of this area of business as well as on the required skill set needed in the various employment opportunities existing in this field. The course will include a practical application that will involve students in the planning, organizing and execution of an event.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 10000 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • HTM 43000 - Hospitality Strategic Management


    The purpose of this course is to survey tools and techniques of strategic analysis, formulation implementation of competitive and corporate strategy. Specifically, this class aims to prepare for leadership roles in the hospitality industry by focusing on the knowledge, skills, values and perspectives needed to manage hospitality organizations, strategically.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ECON 20000; HTM 37400; HTM 14100 or BUS 20100; and HTM 24200 or BUS 20200. Each class must be completed with a grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • HTM 44100 - Financial Management For The Hospitality Industry


    This course deals with subjects and issues facing a financial manager in the hospitality and tourism industry. The primary purposes of this course are to understand the role of financial management, to learn analytic concepts and managerial tools for making capital investment decisions and to become familiar with major financial instruments and concepts such as time value of money, risk-return, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and capital structure.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 10000, HTM 18100, and either HTM 14100 or BUS 20100, and either HTM 24200 or BUS 20200. Each class must be completed with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • HTM 45200 - Professional Development III


    This capstone course is designed to help senior students identify their strengths and weaknesses in the context of prospective employment. Students will apply interviewing skills, web presence and learn to adapt their application letters and curriculum vitae to specific employment opportunities.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  HTM 35000.

    Cr. 1.
  
  • HTM 49100 - Beverage Management


    Principles and practices regarding the production, selection, purchasing, storage, and service of beverage alcohol in the hospitality industry. State of Indiana responsible alcohol service certification is required to earn course credit.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  HTM 31000 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 2.
    Notes
    Must be a minimum of 21 years of age.
  
  • HTM 49111 - Beverage Operation Management


    This course teaches students the historical background and modern day principles and management practices regarding the production, selection, purchasing, storage and service of beverage alcohol in all aspects of the hospitality industry. Certification in State of Indiana Responsible Service of Alcohol program is required to earn course credit.

    Preparation for Course
    CC: HTM 49112. Students must be at least 21 years of age as of the start of the course. Departmental approval required.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    $30 for ServSafe alcohol handler online course and primary exam.
    https://www.servsafe.com/access/SS/Catalog/ProductDetail/SSAOLP3
  
  • HTM 49112 - Management And Service Of Beverage Alcohol


    This course introduces the principles and practices associated with the production of beverage alcohol in the hospitality industry. Lectures and structured tastings will guide students in identifying and describing the unique characteristics of fermented beverages commonly found in the hospitality industry. Students will be tasting alcohol as part of this course, they need to be at least 21 years of age to do so legally. 

    Preparation for Course
    CC: HTM 49111. Students must be at least 21 years of age as of the start of course. Departmental approval required.

    Cr. 2.
    Notes
    $40 course fee to be used for purchasing supplies for tasting during the sensory training component.
  
  • HTM 49400 - Advanced Restaurant Management


    Demonstrate managerial skills and knowledge by developing a complete business plan that includes development of the concept, design of the operational environment, menu and service product, financial documentation, marketing study and plans as well as necessary operating procedures and manuals for opening a “turn-key” full-service restaurant. Emphasis is placed on utilizing effective management skills and knowledge to create a business plan that has a realistic potential to raise the necessary capital to create a sustainable business.

    Preparation for Course
    P: HTM 31000 with grade of C- or better and HTM 34100 with grade of C- or better. 

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab 2.
  
  • IDIS 10301 - Freshman Seminar/The Individual, Culture, And Society


    Introduction to study of the nature and diversity of individuals, cultures, and societies. Interdisciplinary approach integrating mastery of subject-matter content with improvement of learning strategies, critical thinking, and problem solving.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Meets criteria of PFW General Education Area III. Topic varies.
    Open only to freshmen.
    Credit for only one of: IDIS 11000, 10301 or 10401.
  
  • IDIS 10401 - Freshman Seminar: Humanistic Thought


    Introduction to major questions, traditions, and tools of humanistic inquiry. Interdisciplinary approach integrating mastery of subject-matter content with improvement of learning strategies, critical thinking, and problem solving.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Meets criteria of PFW General Education Area IV. Topic varies.
    Open only to freshmen.
    Credit for only one of: IDIS 11000, 10301 or 10401.
  
  • IDIS 10605 - Introduction To The Liberal Arts


    Exploration of a specific issue, problem, or topic (e.g., place, citizenship, identity, social change) integrating the perspectives of at least two different disciplines from the liberal arts. Variable topic course. Specific topics announced in the Schedule of Classes. Suitable for students from any major. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: Instructor approval required.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit with different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  • IDIS 11000 - Freshman Success Course


    Freshman Success is a course designed to increase the success of freshmen by assisting them with the skills necessary to reach their educational goals. Topics in this course include academic concerns (academic major information, learning skills, study skills, time management) and personal-social concerns (interpersonal relationship skills, communication skills, setting goals).

    Cr. 1-3.
    Notes
    Open only to freshmen.
    Credit for only one of: IDIS 11000, 10301, or 10401.
  
  • IDIS 20100 - Introduction To Digital Humanities


    This is an interdisciplinary foundational course that combines theory and practice to teach students in and about digitally mediated culture. Accordingly, this course fosters a critical understanding of the digital and its implication for the development of a technologically driven society. Students will be introduced to digital inquiry and critical practice and explore the ways that the digital transforms knowledge acquisition and production across the humanities, social sciences and sciences. Students will engage in readings and activities that help them form substantive perspectives on the digital formulations and practice through digital technologies and tools. Students will also experiment with digital methods and tools by building a digital project. This course places an emphasis on engaged learning through online and in-class discussion, digital activities, and collaborative work. 

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IDIS 20200 - Humanities II: Foundations of the Modern Western World


    Investigates art, architecture, literature, philosophy, religion, and music from 1300 to present. Primary focus on Western tradition. Representative works treated chronologically in their historical/cultural settings. Practicum develops critical appreciation through interpretive observation, listening, and reading.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 13100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IDIS 20300 - Intern Ready


    Students will earn one credit by successfully completing all of the requirements of the Intern Ready Certificate through the Endorsed program offered by the Career Development Center.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Instructor approval required.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Pass/No Pass grades assigned.
  
  • IDIS 30001 - Internship Experience


    A supervised internship experience linking academic studies with relevant work experience. Part-time employment concurrent with full time study or full-time employment concurrent with potential parrt-time study.  

    Preparation for Course
    P: Instructor approval required.

    Cr. 0-3.
    Notes
    Pass/No Pass grades assigned. Variable credit, 0-3 credits, dependent on a number of hours worked during the semester. 
  
  • IDIS 41700 - General Studies Degree Capstone


    This Course is a summation and finalization of components learned over the completion of the Bachelors of General Studies curriculum. The course is designed to showcase the interdisciplinary ideas, skills, and abilities of the degree as achieved by the student. Students will complete assignments that highlight their Bachelors of General Studies skills in the current job market and their intended career. A number of various assignments will be utilized during the course.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Admitted into a General Studies degree program with senior class standing.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IDIS 42100 - Career Ready


    Students will earn one credit by successfully completing all of the requirements of the Career Ready Certificate through the Endorsed program offered by the Career Development Center.

    Preparation for Course
    P: IDIS 20300.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Permission of Instructor required.
  
  • IET 10500 - Industrial Management


    An overview of industrial engineering technology including manufacturing organization and quality production.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IET 20400 - Maintaining Quality


    Analysis of the basic principles of quality control. Includes an overall view of quality control from an engineering and manufacturing perspective. Includes the statistical aspects of tolerance, concepts of variation and control charting.

    Preparation for Course
    P or C: MA 15300 (or equivalent) with grade of C- or better. 

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IET 20500 - Applied Statistics For Engineering Technology


    Introduction to Engineering Technology applications of statistical methods. Emphasis on data analysis of technological and industrial problems. Introduction of Design of Experiments, basic probability, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, significance tests for means and proportions, correlation and regression. Software is used throughout.

    Preparation for Course
    P: MA 15300 ( or equivalent) with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IET 22400 - Production Planning And Control


    A survey of production inventory control procedures including material requirements planning, just-in-time methods, and project management.

    Preparation for Course
    P: MA 15300 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IET 25700 - Ergonomics


    The course covers application of ergonomic principles to the design of interface between human and machine systems, and consideration of human abilities and limitations in relation to design of equipment and work environment.

    Preparation for Course
    C: ET 10600.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IET 26700 - Work Methods Design


    An introduction to workplace design and work measurement, including time and motion study, ergonomics, and process standardization.

    Preparation for Course
    P: IET 10500.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IET 27400 - Industrial Practice I


    Practice in industry and written reports of this practice for co-op students.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Admission to the Cooperative Education Program.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Pass/Not Pass grades assigned.
  
  • IET 27500 - Industrial Practice II


    Practice in industry and written reports of this practice for co-op students.

    Preparation for Course
    P: IET 27400.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Pass/Not Pass grades assigned.
  
  • IET 30400 - Advanced Metrology


    Variable and attribute gage capability studies; measurements and calculations of repeatability, reproducibility, bias, stability, and linearity; measurement uncertainty; traceability to NIST standards; inspection of parts using GD&T callouts.

    Preparation for Course
    P: IET 20400 and MET 22300.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IET 31000 - Plant Layout And Material Handling


     Plant layout involves the design of a production system. The layout must provide for machines, work places, material handling systems, and storage in the capacities necessary so feasible schedules can be met for parts and products; auxiliary services such as offices, shipping and handling, security, maintenance, etc., must support the firm’s requirements for safe and efficient production. The design of this system must possess an appropriate degree of flexibility to cope with future design change, new products, volume variations and advancing technology.

    Preparation for Course
    P: MA 15300 or 15900 with grade of C- or better (or equivalent).  C: MET 10400.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab 1.
  
  • IET 35000 - Engineering Economy


    Analysis of the time value of money as applied to the manufacturing and construction environment. It also covers principles of product and project costing.

    Preparation for Course
    P: MA15400 or 15900 with grade of C- or better (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IET 36200 - Technological Optimization


    An introduction to linear programming applied to optimization in a manufacturing environment.

    Preparation for Course
    P: MA15400 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IET 36900 - Manufacturing Simulation


    An introduction to computer simulation of complex manufacturing systems.

    Preparation for Course
    P: STAT 30100 or IET 20500.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IET 37500 - Industrial Practice III


    Practice in industry and written reports of this practice for co-op students.

    Preparation for Course
    P: IET 27500.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Pass/Not Pass grades assigned.
  
  • IET 37600 - Industrial Practice IV


    Practice in industry and written reports of this practice for co-op students.

    Preparation for Course
    P: IET 37500.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Pass/Not Pass grades assigned.
  
  • IET 40100 - Design For Manufacture


    Analysis and planning of common production processes.

    Preparation for Course
    P: MET 33500.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IET 45400 - Statistical Process Control


    Online process control including design and analysis of process control charts and sampling plans.

    Preparation for Course
    P: IET 20400 and 20500.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IET 47500 - Industrial Practice V


    Practice in industry and written reports of this practice for co-op students.

    Preparation for Course
    P: IET 37600.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Pass/Not Pass grades assigned.
  
  • IET 47800 - Lean Manufacturing and Design


    This course covers theory and practical aspects of lean manufacturing concepts. Students will be able to apply the basic lean concepts of 5S, waste elimination, inventory and setup reduction, visual management, standardized work, error proofing, lean layout design, value stream mapping, pull system, and lean measurables. The course includes required project work to be done in teams.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Junior Standing.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IET 48000 - Cost Estimating and Design


    Economic design of manufacturing systems. Includes a capstone project.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Senior Standing and C: ENGL 42100.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 0-5, Lab. 0-9.
  
  • IET 49900 - Industrial Engineering Technology


    Hours and subject matter to be arranged by staff.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated up to 9 credits.
  
  • ILCS 20800 - International Cinema


    In this course students will study international cinema in order to increase their critical thinking, analytical, and communicative ability through reading and writing about films made outside of the United States. It will focus on the international filmmakers that work consiously to express their own sense of national identity.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab 2.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  • ILCS 26100 - Introduction To The Linguistic Study Of Foreign Languages


    Overview of linguistics and the role of language and society; fundamental concepts of linguistic analysis. The course focuses on linguistic phenomena found in French, German, Russian, and Spanish, with material, examples, and assignments drawn primarily from those languages whenever appropriate. 

    Cr. 3.
  
  • ILCS 30000 - Methods Of Research And Criticism


    Study of methods of literary analysis and bibliographical documentation. Basic techniques of research, footnoting, and intensive writing. Critical approaches to drama, novel, and poetry. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 13100 (or equivalent) and two years of college foreign language.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Required for foreign language majors.
    Approved by College of Liberal Studies for use in fulfilling the sophomore writing requirement.
  
  • ILCS 33100 - Comparative International Culture


    The term “culture” elicits inquiry on shared thoughts and practices of people around the world. The term invites exploration of cultural practice that involves differences, similarities, and what yields harmony and conflict. 

    The course brings together faculty members from across the university, mainly in the humanities and social sciences.  They will present case study material and explicitly draw on their disciplines and areas of expertise.  Students will explore diverse ways to approach the subject of culture and appreciate the importance of the cultural paradigm applied to manifestations of culture (art, literature, movies, religion, education, habits, or countless other activities in today’s world).

    Preparation for Course
    P:  ENGL 13100 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.

  
  • ILCS 35000 - International Communication


    This course examines international communication, global business etiquette, and it teaches cultural sensitivity and awareness based on the study of the interfaces of language, culture, and communication.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • INTD 11100 - Introduction To Interior Design


    This is an introduction course for interior design majors. The course covers topics of design theory, color theory, light and lighting system, design process, interior finishes, brief interior design history and interior design practice.  

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Studio 3.
  
  • INTD 11200 - Interior Design I


    This course emphasizes on residential design. Emphasis will be placed on kitchen and bath design. The projects include house design, apartment design and any other residential related projects.  

    Preparation for Course
    P: INTD 11100 and 20100 (or equivalents).

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Studio 3.
  
  • INTD 12100 - Freehand Sketching


    Drawing in the freehand method will be presented in pencil, ink, and markers. The course is aimed at the beginning design student. It will utilize objects of interior environment as a means of understanding various drawing principles and familiarize the student with basic rendering techniques.  

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Studio 3.
  
  • INTD 12300 - Perspective Drawing


    This course emphasizes on perspective drawing techniques. One-point perspective and two-point perspective concepts and drawings are introduced and demonstrated. Perspective drawings are created with multimedia.  

    Preparation for Course
    P: INTD 12100 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Studio 3.
  
  • INTD 13100 - Decorative Materials And Accessories I


    History of textiles, fiber content, weaves, and designs. Functional uses of fabrics for interiors (i.e., windows, upholstery). Emphasis will be put on the textile and use of materials through design problems. The assembling of notebooks is required.  

    Cr. 3.
  
  • INTD 13200 - Decorative Materials And Accessories II


    This course emphasizes on architectural and interior materials including floor materials, wall materials, ceiling materials as well as any hard surface materials. The materials application and installation will be introduced.  

    Cr. 3.
  
  • INTD 20100 - CAD For Interior Design


    This course introduces techniques of using computer software to create 2D drawings and 3D models. It also introduces multi-media approach to create 3D models by applying materials and lighting.  

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Studio 3.
  
  • INTD 20600 - Portfolio And Professional Presentation


    Students will study portfolio design and publication methods. Graphic presentation techniques will be studied and developed. Development of a personal portfolio is required. Cover letters, digital portfolio, resume and job search strategies will be coved in this course.  

    Preparation for Course
    P: INTD 11200, 20100 and 24100 (or equivalents).

    Cr. 3.
  
  • INTD 22000 - Architecture And Urban Form


    Survey of styles and influence of cultures that led to the development of architecture and engineering from the earliest times to the early 20th century.  

    Cr. 3.
  
  • INTD 24100 - Lighting And Color Design


    Study of how natural and artificial lighting and color affect the human environment. The course emphasizes on lighting design for different commercial spaces.  

    Preparation for Course
    P: INTD 11200 and 20100 (or equivalents).

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Studio 3.
  
  • INTD 29900 - Interior Design


    Special topics of study with concentration on developing knowledge in a specific area of interior design. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: Departmental approval required.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  • INTD 30600 - Interior And Furniture Styles I


    This course introduces historical interiors and furniture styles of the ancient world: Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Romanesque, Gothic, and 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries of Renaissance Europe.  

    Cr. 3.
  
  • INTD 30700 - Interior And Furniture Styles II


    This course covers historical interiors and furniture styles of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries in France, England, and the United States.  

    Cr. 3.
  
  • INTD 30800 - Interior Design II


    This course emphasizes on design principles of commercial/institutional projects. The course covers topics of space planning for office building, reception area design, conference room design as well as workstation design. This course also covers topics of building code, clearance and circulation.  

    Preparation for Course
    P: INTD 11200 and 20100 (or equivalents).

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Studio 3.
  
  • INTD 30900 - Interior Design III


    The development and application of spatial concepts through the design of a commercial/institutional interior project. The course incorporates contents of all prerequisite courses. Presentation techniques will be emphasized.  

    Preparation for Course
    P: INTD 20100 and 30800 (or equivalents).

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Studio 3.
  
  • INTD 31000 - Interior Design Travel


    This course emphasizes on the investigation of design solutions, aesthetic language, symbol language, and cultural context through visits to sites of art, architecture and design significance. A greater understanding is developed through analysis and reflection.  

    Preparation for Course
    P: Department approval required.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Field Trip of 30 to 40 hours.
  
  • INTD 32001 - Architecture And Urban Form In The Modern World


    Survey of architectural styles, design theories and the influence of cultures that led to the development of architecture in modern world.  

    Preparation for Course
    P: INTD 22000 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
  
  • INTD 33000 - Culture And Design: A Cross-Cultural Comparison Of Architecture


    Architecture and the built-environment reflect cultural aspects of a society. In this course, Eastern architecture and Western architecture are compared with emphasis on palace architecture, house, garden and modern architecture. The interrelationship of architecture and culture is examined through design principles and famous architecture.  

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 11400 and ENGL 13100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • INTD 40001 - Interior Design Studio I


    The course is the first senior capstone course. In this course, students will develop project program and schematic design for the projects. Studio projects will be real world projects chosen from the following list: residential design, special population - aging; healthcare design, education design, hotel design, restaurant design, or corrections design.  

    Preparation for Course
    P: INTD 20100 and 30900. Departmental approval required.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Studio 3.
  
  • INTD 40100 - Interior Design Studio II


    Interior Design Studio II is the second capstone course. It emphasizes on design development and construction documents for the project that is continued from INTD 40001. The course contents include how to create construction documents for senior projects and senior project report. Graphic presentation skills and digital 3-D model creation skills will be further developed. Senior students will participate in annual senior exhibition.  

    Preparation for Course
    P: INTD 40001.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Studio 3.
  
  • INTD 40200 - Professional Practice


    The study of professional office and business procedures for the practice of interior design. Includes public relations, marketing, legal, accounting and financial considerations, professional organizations and conduct, resourcing, project management, contracts, forms, and documents.  

    Preparation for Course
    P: INTD 30800 and ENGL 23202.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • INTD 40300 - Interior Design Details


    This course introduces how to create interior details in construction documents. Construction documents standards, contents, orders and graphic symbols will be introduced as well.  

    Preparation for Course
    P: INTD 20100 and 24100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • INTD 40400 - Interior Design Practicum


    Special problems in space planning and design. The work-study or internship provides students the opportunity to supplement traditional education with practical work.  

    Preparation for Course
    P: INTD 40001 and 40200.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • INTD 49900 - Interior Design Project


    Special topics of study with concentration on developing knowledge in a specific area of interior design.  

    Preparation for Course
    P:Must be in INTR program/INTR major. Authorized equivalent courses or consent of instructor may be used in satisfying course pre- and co-requisites.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Hours
    Studio 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  • INTL 15500 - Introduction To Language And Culture In Near Eastern Studies And East Asian Studies


    This course enables students to acquire a basic understanding of the cultures and languages of the Arab world and East Asia, primarily China and Japan. The emphasis on each culture varies from time to time.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    May be repeated with different aspects of culture of these regions for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  • INTL 20000 - Introduction to International Studies


    An interdisciplinary, team-taught course for students who wish to deepen their understanding of an increasingly interdependent world and broaden their perspective of a variety of international topics such as international politics and history, global environmental issues, international business and economics, and international cultural studies.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Sophomore or higher class standing required. 

    Cr. 3.
  
  • INTL 20800 - International Cinema


    In this course students will study international cinema in order to increase their critical thinking, analytical, and communicative ability through reading and writing about films made outside of the United States. It will focus on the international filmmakers that work consciously to express their own sense of national identity.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IST 14000 - Introduction To Visual Programming


    This course introduces programming using a visual approach. Students will learn the syntax and structure of an object-oriented programming language. They will develop stand-alone, event-driven graphical user interface (GUI) applications for personal computer use.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab 3.
  
  • IST 16000 - Foundation And Role Of Information Systems


    This course is designed to introduce students to contemporary information systems (IS) and demonstrate how these systems are used throughout global organizations. The focus of this course will be on the key components of information systems - people, software, hardware, data, and communication technologies, and how these components can be integrated and managed to create competitive advantage. Through the knowledge of how IS provides a competitive advantage students will gain an understanding of how information is used in organizations and how information technology (IT) enables improvement in quality, speed, and agility. This course also provides an introduction to systems and development concepts, technology acquisition, and current emerging application software in modern organizations and society.  

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IST 20300 - Advanced Visual Programming


    This course continues the study of visual programming begun in IST 14000. Students will create multi-tier, event-driven applications using object-oriented approaches and databases. Students will also create applications. Students will be introduced to data structures.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  IST 14000 or CS 11400 or ECET 11400.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IST 26500 - Enterprise Systems


    This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the theoretic and practical issues related to the application of Enterprise Systems within organizations. The main focus of this course is to demonstrate how Enterprise Systems integrate information and organizational processes across functional areas, and global operations, with a unified system comprised of a single database and shared reporting tools. Example software will be used to illustrate how Enterprise Systems work.

    Preparation for Course
    P: IST 16000 or BUS 32100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IST 27000 - Data And Information Management


    This course provides the students with an introduction to the core concepts in data and information management. It is centered around the core skills of identifying organizational information requirements, modeling them using conceptual data modeling techniques, converting the conceptual data models into relational data models and verifying its structural characteristics with normalization techniques, and implementing and utilizing a relational database using a database management system. This course will also include coverage of basic database administration tasks, how large-scale packaged systems are highly dependent on the use of a Database Management System (DBMS) and data and information management technologies.

    Preparation for Course
    P: IST 16000 or BUS 32100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  • IST 29200 - Intermediate Topics In Information Systems


    Intermediate seminar addressing current topics or issues in Computer Science or Information Systems.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Instructor approval required. 

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credit hours.
  
  • IST 29500 - Industrial Practicum


    Practical problems in local industry limited to about 10 to 20 hours per week for which the student may receive some remuneration. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: Sophomore or higher class standing required and instructor approval required.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Pass/Not Pass grades assigned.
    May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credit hours.
    Open only to full-time students.
 

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