Oct 07, 2022  
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order.

Standard information for each course includes the number, title, and credits (sometimes called credit hours or semester hours). For some courses, you will find information on the hours of class, laboratory, or studio for which the course is scheduled in each week of a regular semester; these weekly hours are expanded during summer sessions. Fees for courses are assessed on the basis of credits and other factors.

The course-numbering system generally suggests levels of difficulty and appropriateness. Courses at the 100 and 200 levels comprise introductory offerings and those are most commonly taken by freshmen and sophomores. Courses at the 300 and 400 levels are primarily for juniors and seniors. In some Purdue programs, undergraduates take courses at the 500 level, but generally courses numbered 500 and above are for graduate students.

Preparation for courses is indicated as follows:

P: indicates a prerequisite that must precede your enrollment in the course described. You may find one or more specific course numbers, the number of credits you should already have in a subject, a placement-test level, or other conditions.

C: indicates a corequisite that must be taken no later than the same semester in which you take the course described.

R: indicates a recommendation concerning conditions to be met for enrollment in the course.

When no subject code is shown for prerequisites, corequisites, and recommended courses, they are in the same subject area as the course being described. If you lack a prerequisite or corequisite, or if you wish to take a course numbered at a higher level than your present status, you should seek the department’s or instructor’s consent to enroll in the course.

V.T. means Variable Title and is shown for courses for which the title may be changed to specify the topic or other special focus of each offering.

Purdue University Fort Wayne reserves the right to add, withdraw, or change courses without notice.

 

 
  
  •  

    ENGL 25100 - American Literature Since 1865


    An introductory survey of representative works with an emphasis on major writers.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 13100 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  •  

    ENGL 30102 - Critical And Historical Survey Of English Literature I


    Representative selections with emphasis on major writers from the beginnings to Swift and Pope.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 30103 - Writing Fiction


    Further exploration in the art of fiction writing.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20301 (in fiction) or Submission of Acceptable Manuscripts to Instructor in Advance of Registration.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    With permission of instructor, may be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    ENGL 30202 - Critical And Historical Survey Of English Literature II


    Representative selections with emphasis on major writers from the rise of romanticism to the present.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 30301 - Writing Poetry


    Further exploration in the art of poetry writing.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20301 (in poetry) or Submission of Acceptable Manuscripts to Instructor in Advance of Registration.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    ENGL 30401 - Contemporary African American Poetry Forms


     In this class we will study mostly original poetic forms created by contemporary African American authors to learn basic principles poets use to create poetry. We will practice those techniques in a series of exercises that will allow us to explore different forms of contemporary poetry. This class will give you a basic understanding of poetic form, which you can draw upon as you continue to write poetry.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20301 or 20302.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  •  

    ENGL 32301 - Digital Writing


    Designed to help students read, analyze, evaluate, and author websites from a variety of perspectives (e.g. historically, usability, rhetorically, and technically). Students will design their own websites by working in raw code and composing with HTML editors, and by capturing, creating, and manipulating graphics.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 13100 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 33101 - Business And Administrative Writing


    Emphasis on proposals, presentations, collaborative and individual reports needed within a business, administrative, or organizational setting. Students discover how the process and products of writing shape organizational culture by studying documents organizations use, from hiring to setting ethical standards, as they communicate both internally and globally.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 36301 - Nonprofit And Grant Writing


    Nonprofit and Grant Writing is a professional writing course that teaches students the essential rhetorical moves for nonprofit and grant proposal writing. Students will identify sources of funding, research for supporting data, and write for specific audiences.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  ENGL 20201 or 23301 or 23401 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 36402 - Editing For Publication


    Examines the writing process from the perspective of the manager who supervises the writing of texts that become products: books, newsletters, websites, etc. It explores the document production process, focusing on design, desktop publishing, web publishing, and the stages of writing project management.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201, ENGL 23301, or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 37101 - Senior English Capstone


     Focuses on reflection and revision of past work, creation of a high-quality independent work, and careers and job preparation.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201, ENGL 23301, or Equivalent.

    Junior or Senior Class Standing Required.

     

    Cr. 3.

  
  •  

    ENGL 39500 - Individual Study Of Writing


    Practice in and study of informative, persuasive, or literary writing.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    ENGL 39800 - Internship In Writing


    Combines study of writing with practical experience of working with professionals in journalism, business communication, or technical writing. Researched reports are required. Evaluations made by both supervisor and instructor.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 13100 or Honors Eligibility.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Notes
    May be repeated, with permission of instructor, with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    ENGL 40001 - Issues In Teaching Writing


    Focuses on the content of rhetoric and composition and considers fundamental theoretical and practical issues in the teaching of writing. Reviews rhetorical and compositional principles that influence writing instruction, textbook selection, and curriculum development.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 40010 - Writing Fiction


    Further exploration in the art of fiction writing.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 40101 - Advanced Fiction Writing


    Focused work in the art and profession of fiction writing.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20301 or ENGL 20302 with a Grade of C- or Better; or Submission of Acceptable Manuscripts to Instructor in Advance of Registration.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    With permission of instructor, may be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    ENGL 40102 - History Of The English Language


    Historical and structural analysis of English language in stages of its development. Political and social events affecting development of language; interrelationship of language and literature, evolution of modern English phonology, syntax, orthography, and lexicon.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 40203 - Structure of Modern English (TESOL)


    Linguistic analysis of present-day spoken and written English, with attention to its phonemic, morphemic, and syntactical systems and its system of expressive features.

    Preparation for Course
    P: LING 10300.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 40301 - Advanced Poetry Writing


    Focused work in the art and profession of poetry writing.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Submission of Acceptable Manuscripts to Instructor in Advance of Registration.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    With permission of instructor, may be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    ENGL 40401 - Old English Language And Literature


    Language and literature of England before the Norman Conquest, with intensive study of original texts.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 40501 - Writing Prose - Creative Nonfiction


    Variable topics relating to the production of non-fiction prose. Includes an intensive written project that may involve research as well as production of essays.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 2-3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 40502 - Chaucer


    Examination of The Book of the Duchess, The Parliament of Fowls, Troilus and Criseyde, and selected Canterbury Tales to acquaint students with the language, conventions, and background of Chaucer’s poetry.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 40601 - Middle English Literature


    A survey of Middle English lyrics, drama, and romance, with special attention to Langland, The Pearl-poet, and Gower, designed to acquaint the student with the language and literary development of England from 1066 to 1500.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 40801 - Elizabethan Drama And Its Background


    English drama from Middle Ages to 1642, including principal Elizabethan and Caroline dramatists and their best plays.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or 23301 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 40901 - Elizabethan Poetry


    Major Elizabethan poets, with special attention to Spenser.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or 23301 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 41402 - Using Poems To Beat Death (Finding Poetry To Live)


    This course will provide an exploration and examine into poetics and its relationship with performance. Students will view, read, analyze, and discuss, as well as explore the structural, figurative, and literary devices of poetic language, while practicing performance poetry.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 41501 - Major Plays Of Shakespeare


    A close reading of a representative selection of Shakespeare’s major plays.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or 23301 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Credit not given for both ENGL 22001 and ENGL 41501 (or ENG L315).
  
  •  

    ENGL 41701 - English Poetry Of The Early 17th Century


    Chief poets and their intellectual milieu (1600-1660).

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or 23301 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 41801 - Milton


    Poetry and prose of John Milton, with special attention to ‘Paradise Lost’, ‘Paradise Regained’, and ‘Samson Agonistes’.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or 23301 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 42002 - Argumentative Writing


    Examines techniques for analyzing and constructing arguments, especially the use of proofs, evidence, and logic. Considers such issues of argument as the ethics of persuasion and the use of style. Students write researched arguments on political, legal, scientific, and academic issues.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 42101 - Technical Writing Projects


    Application of the principles of technical reporting to a major piece of primary research and development, usually a senior project in the major.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Junior or Senior Class Standing and ENGL 23401 or ENGL 33101.

    Cr. 1-3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 42202 - Creativity And Community


    This course addresses questions of what it means to create and be creative - as writers, scholars, teachers, professionals and citizens-within the contexts of various communities. The course’s main purpose is to develop each participant’s creativity in ways that will enhance their participation int he discourse communities of their choosing.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 42204 - English Literature 1660-1789


    Survey of nondramatic literature of the Restoration and 18th century. Emphasis on Dryden, Pope, Swift, and Johnson and his circle.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or 23301 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 42502 - Research Methods For Professional Writers


    Examines quantitative, qualitative, and action research techniques as practiced by professionals working in various field of writing:  technical and business writing, freelance and creative writing, academic writing, community and grant writing, journalism, and the teaching of writing.  It includes coverage of both primary (i.e. field) and secondary (i.e. library) research.

    Preparation for Course
    Pre-req: ENGL 23301.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 43200 - Second Language Acquisition


    An introduction to a broad range of issues in the field of second language acquisition. Providies students with an overview of  important approaches to the fundamental questions of how people learn a second language, basic knowledge of theories, and an understanding of how theoretical perspectives inform practical application.

    Preparation for Course
    P: LING 10300.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 43202 - Romantic Literature


    Surveys the principal writers of the Romantic Movement (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats).

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 43501 - Victorian Literature


    A survey of English poetry and prose from about 1832 to 1900. Attention to figures like Tennyson, Browning, and Carlyle.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or 23301 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 44501 - 20th Century British Poetry


    Modern poets, particularly Yeats, Eliot, Auden; some later poets may be included.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 44601 - 20th Century British Fiction


    20th-century novel and its techniques and experiments, chiefly Lawrence, Joyce, Woolf, and recent novelists.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or 23301 (or equivalent). 

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 44700 - British Fiction To 1800


    Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such writers as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or 23301 (or equivalent). 

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 44800 - 19th Century British Fiction


    Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such writers as Scott, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or 23301 (or equivalent). 

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 45101 - American Literature 1800-1865


    Emphasis on Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, and Whitman.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or 23301 (or equivalent). 

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 45200 - American Literature 1865-1914


    Emphasis on Mark Twain, Dickinson, James, and two or three additional major writers.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or 23301 (or equivalent). 

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 45400 - American Literature Since 1914


    Provides an understanding of the pivotal literary innovations and cultural changes during this period. Literary movements such as naturalism, realism, and modernism may be the subject of focus, as might changes in race and gender relations, labor politics, immigration policies, regionalism, and the increasing shift from agricultural to urban economics.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or 23301 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 45501 - American Fiction To 1900


    Survey of representative 19th century American fiction, with emphasis on works of Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Mark Twain, James, and Dreiser.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 45700 - 20th Century American Poetry


    American poetry since 1900, including such poets as Pound, Eliot, Frost, Stevens, Williams, and Lowell.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 45800 - 20th Century American Fiction


    American fiction since 1900, including such writers as Dreiser, Lewis, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, and Bellow.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 46001 - Introduction To Literacy Studies


    This course provides an overview of literacy studies while also focusing on the literacy practices and beliefs of particular groups. The course moves beyond reductive discussions of literacy by introducing students to a range of literacy studies scholarship that challenges popular conceptualizations of literacy.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 46201 - Studies In Rhetoric And Composition


    An examination of major rhetorical theories and their applications for writers and for teachers of composition. Focuses on theories of discourse, invention, form, style, and audience. Aims at developing greater understanding of the writing process.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 23301 or Equivalent; and Junior or Senior Standing.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    ENGL 46401 - Native American Literature


    A survey of traditional and modern literature by American Indians, especially of the high plains and southwest culture areas, with particular attention to the image of the Indian in both native and white literature.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 46500 - Theories And Practices Of Editing


    Students will examine textual and literary approaches to editing given particular rhetorical contexts. Emphasis will be placed on how to make editorial judgments that promote editorial standards without violating authorial intent.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 46700 - Writing For Multiple Media


    Introduces principles and practices of multimedia design and implementation, with emphasis on writing in multimedia contexts. Students will consider ways that new media affect the production and reception of writing and its relationship to other forms of communication (e.g., oral and visual).

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 46901 - Studies In British And American Authors


    Studies in single authors (such as Wordsworth or Melville), groups of authors (such as minority writers), periods (such as American writers of the 1920s), and genres (such as tragedy). Topics will vary from semester to semester.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    ENGL 47200 - Contemporary American Fiction


    American fiction of the last 20 years, including such writers as Bellow, Barth, Didion, Malamud, Pynchon, and Updike.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 47201 - Composing The Self


    Study of the ways in which our identities are formed, sustained, and reformed, particularly with respect to gender, race, class, and sexuality. Focus on both exploratory and polished writing as well as works by various authors.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 47600 - Writers Reading


    Investigation of how writers, readers, and texts are shaped within the contexts of literature, composition, and professional writing. Focus on using current conventions more consciously and flexibly to generate new ways of reading and writing that better serve our specific needs, desires, and goals.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 47800 - Studies In Women And Literature


    British and American authors, such as George Eliot, Gertrude Stein; groups of authors, such as the Brontë sisters, recent women poets; or genres and modes, such as autobiography, film, criticism. Topics will vary from semester to semester.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    ENGL 47901 - American Ethnic And Minority Literature


    A survey of representative authors and works of American ethnic and minority literature with primary focus on black, Hispanic, and Native Americans.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 48100 - Recent Writing


    Selected writers of contemporary significance. May include groups and movements (such as black writers, poets of projective verse, new regionalists, parajournalists and other experiments in pop literature, folk writers, and distinctly ethnic writers); several recent novelists, poets or critics; or any combination of groups.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    ENGL 48801 - Studies In Irish Literature And Culture


    Studies in single authors, such as Yeats or Joyce; groups of authors, such as contemporary Irish poets; periods, such as the Irish literary renaissance; and genres, such as modern Irish drama. Topics will vary from semester to semester.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    ENGL 49001 - Writing Seminar


    This course emphasizes a single aspect or a selected topic of composition and the writing of nonfictional prose.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent; and Submission of Acceptable Manuscripts to Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 49002 - Children’s Literature


    Survey of a wide range (folk tales, fantasy, realistic fiction, poetry, and picture books) of literature for children from the early years to junior high school. Readings from the classics of previous centuries and from the best modern works will be treated from the literary-critical perspective, from which pedagogical conclusions follow. Intended for English majors, for the general student, for teachers past and future, and for parents and librarians.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or 23301 or equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 49102 - Literature For Young Adults


    Survey of representative literary works suitable for middle-school and high-school students. A variety of genres (poetry, mythology, science fiction and fantasy, historical fiction, realistic fiction, and contemporary problem books) will be treated from the literary-critical perspective, from which pedagogical conclusions follow. Intended for English majors, for the general student, for teachers past and present, and for parents and librarians.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 49201 - Topics In Children’s Literature


    Studies in periods, such as contemporary American children’s literature or Victorian fantasies for children; or genres such as picture books or children’s poetry. Topics will vary from semester to semester.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 20201 or ENGL 23301 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    ENGL 49501 - Individual Reading In English


    Individual Reading in English

    Preparation for Course
    P: Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated once for a maximum of 6 credits.
  
  •  

    ENGL 49700 - Writing Center Theory And Practice


    Focuses on writing center theory and practice, including the writing process, theories of composing and the dynamics of peer response. Students will conduct original research and observe writing Center consultations; they may apply in the Writing center upon completion of the course.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 13100 or Honors Eligibility.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 49701 - Editing Of Creative Works


    This course is for students hoping to work with full length, or close to full length projects. The genre of the projects are open–ranging from fiction, poetry, screenplays, to nonfiction prose. We will focus on high order and low order editing concerns for a project, and we will discuss these concerns from the editor’s perspective and the writer’s. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 23301 or equivalent second writing course.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGL 61101 - Writing Fiction


    Writing fiction.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 51101 or permission of the instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGR 12700 - Engineering Fundamentals I


    This course introduces students to engineering applications, analysis, experimentation, and design. The key focus is on the application of mathematical analysis in solving engineering problems. The course includes a project-oriented studio that emphasizes team work, communication, project management, and professional/ethical responsibilities. Significant writing is included. A laboratory component introduces engineering computer tools for visualization and spreadsheet calculation. The course provides an overview of the engineering profession and preparation for success in engineering study.

    Preparation for Course
    P or C: MA 16500 and in an engineering program or pre-program.

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 2, Studio 5.
  
  •  

    ENGR 12800 - Engineering Fundamentals II


    This second course in engineering fundamentals continues the introduction to engineering, applications, analysis, experimentation, and design with a focus on the application of mathematical analysis. The course’s project studio emphasizes team work, project management, and communication with significant writing and speaking and also introduces engineering computer tools for manipulation of data sets and structured programming. The course continues the overview of engineering majors and the engineering profession.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGR 12700 with grade C- or better. P or C: MA 16500 and either COM 11400 or ENGL 13100.

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 2, Studio 5.
    Notes
    $50 Lab Fee required.
  
  •  

    ENGR 19800 - Industrial Practicum


    Engineering practice in local industry.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Sophomore Engineering Status.

    Cr. 0.
  
  •  

    ENGR 41000 - Interdisciplinary Senior Engineering Design I


    The first course of a two-semester sequence of senior capstone design. Provides students with experience in the process and practice of mechanical/ electrical component/system design from concept through final design. Emphasis on teamwork, project management, oral and written communication, general lectures on issues important to the engineering profession, such as professional and ethical responsibility, the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context, and other contemporary issues.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENGR 41100 - Interdisciplinary Senior Engineering Design II


    Continuation of ENGR 41000. Teams complete their projects by implementing what they have designed in ENGR 41000. this includes building, testing, evaluating, and demonstrating their end products.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGR 41000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ENTM 20600 - General Applied Entomology


    A general course on insect structure, function, biology, ecology, and population management. Designed with the ENTM 20700 laboratory series for all agricultural students who want a basic course in entomology.

    Cr. 2.
  
  •  

    ENTM 20700 - General Applied Entomology Laboratory


    This laboratory series complements ENTM 20600. Insect structures and function are studied as a basis for learning to identify insects and other arthropods.

    Cr. 1.
    Hours
    Lab. 2.
  
  •  

    ET 10600 - Introduction to Engineering Technology


    Introduction to careers in engineering technology, with a focus on academic, career, and personal development success strategies including lifelong learning skills and professional ethics. Introduction to analytical and computational problem-solving techniques using the electronic calculator, the factor-label method of unit conversion, engineering graphs, and spreadsheets. Introduction to laboratory testing and technical reports through the integrated use of software packages.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ET 19000 - Statics


    Introduction to fundamentals of applied mechanics, including equilibrium of structures under the influence of forces; trusses; frames; beams; friction; properties of areas; stress and strain in axial systems.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ET 10600 and MA15400 or MA 15900 or MA 22700 or MA 16500 with a Grade of C- or Better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ET 20000 - Strength of Materials


    Principles of applied strength of materials, including shear and bending moment; shear and bending stresses; bearing, connections; column analysis; and deflection of beams.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ET 19000 with a Grade of C- or Better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ET 22000 - Materials Characterization


    Materials characterization of engineering materials, including metallography, microscopy, and introduction to failure analysis. Includes a laboratory component.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  MET 18000 and either CHM 11100 or CHM 11500, or ME 30400.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab 2.
  
  •  

    ET 23000 - Introduction To Polymers


    Introduction to the structure, properties, physical states, processing, and recycling of engineering polymers.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  MET 18000 and either CHM 11100 or 11500, or ME 30400.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ET 24000 - Steelmaking, Forming, And Heat Treating


    The making, forming, and heat-treating of steel mill products such as sheet, bar, rod, rail, and W-beams. Forming processes for subsequent products will also be discussed.

    Preparation for Course
    P: MET 18000 and either CHM 11100 or 11500, or ME 30400.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ET 31000 - Failure Analysis


    Failure analysis and prevention techniques in products made from metals, composites, wood, polymers, and ceramics. Laboratory experience included.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  ET 22000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ET 32000 - Biomedical Materials


    Introduction to materials used in the biomedical industry for implants or surgical tools, including materials selection, mechanical properties, biocompatibility, toxicity, cleanliness, manufacturing methods, standards, and regulations.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  MET 18000 and either CHM 11100 or 11500, or ME 30400.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ET 34000 - Corrosion Control


    Introduction to types of corrosion or degradation in a variety of engineering materials, and methods of controlling corrosion.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  MET 18000 and either CHM 11100 or 11500, or ME 30400.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    ETCS 10600 - Introduction To Computers


    A general introduction to computers and their applications with emphasis on breadth of coverage. Computer system components, terminology, programming concepts, and representative applications. History of computing. Contemporary issues. Productivity tools such as spreadsheets, database, computer graphics and their applications.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Course will not count toward a bachelor’s degree in the computer science department.
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  •  

    FNR 22500 - Dendrology


    Field identification, taxonomy, and ecological characteristics of trees, shrubs, and herbs found in forests, prairies, old fields, and wetlands.

    Preparation for Course
    P: BIOL 10800 or 11700 or 11900 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab. 3.
  
  •  

    FNR 50500 - Molecular Ecology and Evolution


    Lectures cover the genetic attributes of both conventional and contemporary molecular markers. Discussions focus primarily on the use of DNA-based markers to address conceptual issues in ecology and evolutionary biology (e.g., mating systems, systematics, phylogeography). Offered in odd-numbered years.

    Preparation for Course
    P: One Biochemistry Course Recommended; BIOL 21800 or Permission of instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FNR 52300 - Aquaculture


    Historical perspectives and current practices in aquaculture, including production systems, feeds, water quality requirements, and diseases of commercially important species.

    Preparation for Course
    P: BIOL 21700 and BIOL 21900 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FOLK 10100 - Introduction To Folklore


    A view of the main forms and varieties of folklore and folk expression in tales, ballads, myths, legends, beliefs, games, proverbs, riddles, and traditional arts. The role of folklore in the life of mankind.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Placement at or above ENGL 13100 (or Equivalent) and Exemption from or Completion of ENGL 15000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FOLK 11100 - World Music And Culture


    Study of the interrelationship of music sound and behavior. Focus on music events in life and year cycles of selected cultures.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Placement at or above ENGL 13100 (or Equivalent) and Exemption from or Completion of ENGL 15000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FOLK 23000 - Music In Social Movements


    Examines music in socio-political movements, ranging from political and cultural revolutions to government-sponsored campaigns, environmental, and social activism. Explores concepts about the transformative power of music and or organized groups of people, analyzing the practices of movements aimed at changing perception and behavior.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FOLK 25100 - Folklore Methods And Theories


    Basic theoretical approaches to the study of folklore. Relation of folklore to other academic disciplines. History of folklore scholarship. Classification of folklore genres and their function in society. Methods of collecting, analyzing, and indexing traditional materials.

    Preparation for Course
    P: FOLK 10100.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    If you are required by placement examination to take ENGL 15000, it is recommended that you complete that requirement before enrolling in any folklore or classics course.
  
  •  

    FOLK 25400 - Rock and Roll


    A survey of rock and roll music as a uniquely American art form, traced from its roots in Anglo- American folk and country music and African American gospel and blues through its sundry subsequent phases, each viewed within its defining aesthetic, sociocultural, historical, political, and techno-economic contexts.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Placement at or above ENGL 13100 (or Equivalent) and Exemption from or Completion of ENGL 15000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FOLK 30500 - Asian Folklore


    Forms and functions of folklore, folklife, or folk music in the traditional and developing societies of Asia. Folklore as a reflection of culture. Relationship between folklore forms and belief systems in Asia.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Placement at or above ENGL 13100 (or Equivalent) and Exemption from or Completion of ENGL 15000.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated once when topics vary.
  
  •  

    FOLK 35200 - Native American Folklore


    Comparative examination of various verbal, musical, and dance forms of Native American societies. Consideration of cultural systems of Native Americans within the context of general American culture.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Placement at or above ENGL 13100 (or Equivalent) and Exemption from or Completion of ENGL 15000.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated once when topics vary.
  
  •  

    FOLK 40400 - Topics In Folklore


    Topics not covered in depth in existing courses, such as proverbs and riddles, folk drama, folk medicine, folk dance, folk cookery.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Placement at or above ENGL 13100 (or Equivalent) and Exemption from or Completion of ENGL 15000.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    FOLK 43000 - Advanced Study Of Folklore And Related Disciplines


    Advanced studies of folklore and/or ethnomusicology in relationship to other disciplines. Focuses on such interdisciplinary topics as folklore and literature; folklore and psychology; folklore and history; folklore and religion; or folklore, culture, and society.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Placement at or above ENGL 13100 (or Equivalent) and Exemption from or Completion of ENGL 15000.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    FOLK 46500 - Ballads And Folksongs


    Ballads and folk songs of the Western world; their origins, diffusion, relationship to literature, and function. Special attention to the British-American tradition.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Placement at or above ENGL 13100 (or Equivalent) and Exemption from or Completion of ENGL 15000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    FR 11100 - Elementary French I


    Introduction to French language as well as to French and francophone cultures. Emphasis on development of communicative competence in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Weekly attendance at lab required. 

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  •  

    FR 11201 - Elementary French II


    Introduction to French language as well as to French and francophone cultures. Emphasis on development of communicative competence in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Weekly attendance at lab required. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: FR 11100.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
 

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