Aug 12, 2022  
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order.

Standard information for each course includes the number, title, and credits (sometimes called credit hours or semester hours). For some courses, you will find information on the hours of class, laboratory, or studio for which the course is scheduled in each week of a regular semester; these weekly hours are expanded during summer sessions. Fees for courses are assessed on the basis of credits and other factors.

The course-numbering system generally suggests levels of difficulty and appropriateness. Courses at the 100 and 200 levels comprise introductory offerings and those are most commonly taken by freshmen and sophomores. Courses at the 300 and 400 levels are primarily for juniors and seniors. In some Purdue programs, undergraduates take courses at the 500 level, but generally courses numbered 500 and above are for graduate students.

Preparation for courses is indicated as follows:

P: indicates a prerequisite that must precede your enrollment in the course described. You may find one or more specific course numbers, the number of credits you should already have in a subject, a placement-test level, or other conditions.

C: indicates a corequisite that must be taken no later than the same semester in which you take the course described.

R: indicates a recommendation concerning conditions to be met for enrollment in the course.

When no subject code is shown for prerequisites, corequisites, and recommended courses, they are in the same subject area as the course being described. If you lack a prerequisite or corequisite, or if you wish to take a course numbered at a higher level than your present status, you should seek the department’s or instructor’s consent to enroll in the course.

V.T. means Variable Title and is shown for courses for which the title may be changed to specify the topic or other special focus of each offering.

Purdue University Fort Wayne reserves the right to add, withdraw, or change courses without notice.

 

 
  
  •  

    COM 43100 - Practicum In Radio


    Assigned television production for the advanced student only; usually, but not necessarily, involving assigned work at a professional radio media installation.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM11400, COM 25000 or COM 33000, COM 24800 or COM 25100, COM 33100, and Permission of Instructor Required.

    Cr. 2.
    Notes
    May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    COM 43200 - Practicum In Television


    Assigned television production for the advanced student only; usually, but not necessarily, involving assigned work at a professional television media installation.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 14000.

    Cr. 2.
    Notes
    May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    COM 43300 - Practicum In Film


    Assigned film production for the advanced student only; usually, but not necessarily, involving assigned work at a professional film media installation.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM11400, COM 25000 or COM 33000, COM 24800 or COM 25100, COM 33300, and Permission of Instructor Required.

    Cr. 2.
    Notes
    May be repeated once for credit.
  
  •  

    COM 43600 - Script Writing


    Study of forms and materials suitable for the electronic mass media; practice in selection, adaptation, and organization of program materials.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 24800 or COM 25100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 44001 - Rhetoric Of Popular Culture


    This course explores the idea of popular culture as a predominately rhetorical/persuasive force in our everyday lives. This course will cover a diversity of culture forms including: literature, film, music, art, theatre, social movements, politics, economics, sports, celebrity, and more. Students will learn rhetorical and cultural theories that will equip them to be more conscious of, understand more completely, and accept or resist the forces of popular culture in culture, economic, political and social contexts.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 20300.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 44401 - Nonlinear Editing


    Advanced theory and technique in editing for media production across fiction and nonfiction content. viewing and criticism of production techniques in a variety of contexts as well as experiences developing projects in post-production.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 14000.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab 3.
  
  •  

    COM 44800 - Applied Mass Media Research


    Through an examination of current research in mass media, Applied Mass Media Reserach will provide students with the necessary tools to conduct and critique research that pertains specifically to the mass media. Students will learn how to research a mass media related issue.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 46300 - Mass Media Criticism


    Utilizing the current media criticism theories and models, students will learn how to critique a variety of media genres. Students will examine the social and political messages inherent in media messages.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 47100 - Communicating Peace


    Examines the processes by which peace and/or violence are constructed at all communicative levels (intrapersonally, ideologically, and internationally) through face-to-face and mediated communication channels. Students gain an understanding of how we use and misuse communication processes to create peace and/or violence and learn skills for communicating peace.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 11400.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 48000 - Senior Seminar In Communication


    This course is designed as a capstone for the communication major. It will require students to demonstrate proficiency in oral, written, and mediated communication. Students will synthesize their knowledge of communication theory and content.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 12000 and COM 30800.

    Cr. 1.
  
  •  

    COM 49000 - Internship In Communication


    Experiential, supervised training in public relations, journalism, telecommunication, oral interpretation, speech education, organizational communication, or public communication. Usually taken in junior or senior year.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 11400, and Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    COM 49100 - Special Topics In Communication


    Intensive study of selected topics, varying from semester to semester, from the literature or practice of communication. Course content will be drawn from areas not dealt with in the regular curriculum and may include such topics as photojournalism, economic reporting, and campaign communication.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Instructor approval required.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credit hours.
  
  •  

    COM 49200 - Media Internship


    Supervised professional experience in communications media. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: Instructor approval required.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Notes
    Pass/Not Pass grades assigned.
    May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credit hours.
  
  •  

    COM 49900 - Capstone Seminar In Communication


    Communication 49900 is the capstone course for communication majors. This course will provide students with the opportunity to complete and present their academic portfolios; demonstrate proficiency in oral, written, and mediated communication skills; synthesize what they have learned in the degree program; and determine how they might apply their knowledge and skills to both professional and personal lifelong learning situations.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 30800, or consent of instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 50700 - Introduction To Semiotics


    The study of languages, literatures, and other systems of human communication. Includes a wide range of phenomena that can be brought together by means of a general theory of signs. The course deals with three fundamental areas: 1) verbal communication, 2) nonverbal communication (iconic systems, gestures, body language, etc.), and 3) communication through art forms.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 33000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 50800 - Nonverbal Communication In Human Interaction


    An examination of theoretical writings and critical studies in selected areas of nonverbal communication, e.g., environmental influences, space and territory relationships, physical appearance and dress, physical behavior, and vocal cues. One unit will specifically concern itself with measurement, recording, or transcription methods used in nonverbal study.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 21200 and COM 30000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 51200 - Theories Of Interpersonal Communication


    Review of contemporary theories, analysis of concepts, models, and pertinent research across the broad spectrum of interpersonal communication.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 21200 and COM 30000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 51500 - Persuasion In Social Movements


    A study of the concept of persuasion in social movement theory and the role rhetoric has played historically in selected social movements such as suffrage, women’s liberation, civil rights, evangelism, and trade unionism.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 51800 - Theories Of Persuasion


    Review of contemporary theories, including analysis of concepts, models, and pertinent research across the broad spectrum of persuasive communication.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 31800 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 52000 - Small Group Communication


    Survey and critical evaluation of theoretical and empirical literature dealing with human communication within small group settings.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 52100 - Theories Of Rhetoric


    A comprehensive survey of the principal figures, theories, and movements in rhetoric from the classical era to the present.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 31800 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 52200 - History And Criticism Of Public Communication


    A survey of speech-making and speech criticism as forces in shaping America from colonial times to World War II. The course examines great American speakers in shaping history through the use of rhetoric and oratory.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 31800.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 52300 - Communication In Personal Relationships


    Explores the initiation, development, maintenance, and deterioration of family, friend, and romantic relationships. Explores relational phenomena, such as communication and gender differences, computer-mediated relationships, attraction, relational culture, and stages of dissolution.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 21200 and COM 30000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 52700 - Introduction To Cultural Studies


    An examination of selected cultural studies perspectives on mass communication. The course will cover cultural studies philosophies, theories, and/or approaches to the study of cultural artifacts and practices that may include some of the following: postmodernism, deconstruction, feminism, and postcolonialism, privileging context as a means of understanding culture.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 33000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 53100 - Special Topics In Mass Communication


    Critical analysis and evaluation of current and continuing problems in both commercial and public mass communication.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 33000.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    COM 55700 - Legal Dimensions Of Communication


    Analysis of contemporary issues in communication law. Research into selected problems concerning the law and its impact on face-to-face and mass communication.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 35200.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 55900 - Current Trends In Mass Communication Research


    An examination of current research as it contributes to understanding the process and effects of mass communication. Topics covered include gatekeepers and information control, audience selection processes and uses of the media, media content and social learning, the effects of adult programming on children, and the effects of the media on the governmental process.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 33000 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 56000 - Rhetorical Dimensions Of Mass Media


    A study of the ways in which rhetorical elements and processes are embodied in and modified by the media of mass communication. The rhetorical functions of print and electronic media are examined individually as well as within the context of specific campaigns and movements.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 52100 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 57400 - Organizational Communication


    Survey of the theoretical and empirical literature dealing with human communication behavior as it occurs within the context of complex organizations. Among topics covered are superior-subordinate communication, communication networks, message distortion, feedback processes, internal corporate mass media, managerial-communication climate, semantic and stylistic dimensions of messages, and communication in decision making.

    Preparation for Course
    P: COM 32400 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 57600 - Health Communication


    Survey of health communcation theory and research. Examines issues such as patient-provider and everyday communication, broader community-societal discourse, and organizational and mass health communication. Prepares participants for subsequently more specialized seminars and enriched study in allied specialties.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    COM 58500 - Qualitative Methods In Communication Research


    An introduction to qualitative research methods in communication studies. Provides students with an overview of several techniques for, and issues in, gathering, analyzing, writing-up, and using qualitative data.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Permission of department required.
  
  •  

    COM 59700 - Special Topics In Communication


    Seminar of current topics of interest within the discipline of communication.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  •  

    CPET 10100 - Electrical Circuits


    A study of DC electrical circuits, Ohm’s Law, Kirchhoff’s Laws, series and parallel circuits, power, magnetism, ammeters, voltmeters, ohmmeters, inductance, capacitance, and an introduction to alternating voltages, currents and reactances.

    Preparation for Course
    C: MA 15300.

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab. 2 or 3.
  
  •  

    CPET 18100 - Computer Operating Systems Basics


    Introduction to computer operating systems, organization and functions of hardware components, and system software. Topics include system commands, operating system interface, system utilities, shells programming, file systems and management, introduction to concepts, graphical user interface, device drivers, memory management, processes, concurrency, scheduling, multitasking and multiprocessing. Laboratory experiences include Microsoft Windows and UNIX.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2-3, Lab. 0-2.
  
  •  

    CPET 19000 - Problem Solving with MATLAB


    A study of the principles and practice of problem solving using MATLAB. Topics include MATLAB basics, functions and variables, file input and output, user-defined functions and program design, complex data manipulation, graphical user interface, and technical problem-solving applications, etc. The students shall gain hands-on experience through several programming assignments and practice strategies for collaborative problem solving such as creating specifications, brainstorming, sketching an idea, solution evaluation, and solutions testing.

    Preparation for Course
    P: MA 15300 and ECET 11400 or CS 11400.

    Cr. 1-4.
  
  •  

    CPET 28100 - Networks Management


    A study of networks and issues in network planning, design, installation, and management. Topics include network components, standards and protocols, topologies, architectures, system hardware, design and network layout, wiring and installation, network operating systems, servers, connection and services for clients, security and system administration and management. Other topics may include network applications, performance tuning, disaster recovery, hybrid systems, virtual networks, VoIP, and network monitoring and management tools. Work will include experience in Windows and Linux. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: CPET 18100 or ITC 23000.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab 2.
    Notes
    No Lab fees.
  
  •  

    CPET 29900 - Selected Computer Engineering Technology Subjects


    An individual design, special-topics course, sophomore-level research, and/or analytical project in any one of the following areas: computer-based technical problem solving, digital electronics, analog electronics systems, networking systems, computer programming, computer-based problem solving, embedded systems, and system integration.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Restricted to Students Enrolled in B.S. CPET degree program.

    Cr. 1-4.
    Hours
    Class 1-4, Lab. 3-9.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Repeatable up to six hours. Hours and subject matter to be arranged by staff.
  
  •  

    CPET 35500 - Data Communications and Networking


    A survey of communication and networking techniques, protocols and standards. Topics include OSI model, TCP/IP protocols and applications, signals, encoding and modulation, transmission of data and interfaces, transmission media, multiplexing, error detection and correction, data link controls and protocols, switching techniques, and other popular network services.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ECET 20500 or ITC 22000.

    Cr. 4.
    Hours
    Class 3, Lab. 2 or 3.
  
  •  

    CPET 36400 - Networking Security


    This course examines the analysis, design, implementation, and management issues surrounding effective network security. The business, conceptual, and technological aspects of network security for computer networks. Topics include virus protection, firewalls, authentication, encryption, wireless security, security protocols, and network security policy development and fraud protection.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CPET 28100 or CPET 35500 or ECET 35500 or ITC 33000 or CPET 38400 or CS 37400 or equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CPET 38400 - Wide Area Network Design


    Credit by examination: none. This course explores wide area network (WAN) planning and design issues. Emphasis on WAN switching methods and technologies, protocols, and services, traffic engineering, and capacity planning design and tradeoffs. Representative case studies will be used. Other topics may include remote access technologies, access networks, backbone networks, enterprise WAN networks, remote monitoring tools and protocol analyzer, trends in WAN design and WAN integration.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CPET 28100 or CPET/ECET 35500 or CS 27400 or equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CPET 47000 - Technology Project Management


    Topics include project management concepts, project life cycle; project initiation, team building, planning, review, execution, and tracking and control; project-related issues, resource, cost, subcontractor control, and risk management; Web-based project management and collaboration, project management and integration tools. A portion of the course is devoted to case studies. Written reports and oral presentations required.

    Preparation for Course
    P: B.S. CPET Senior Class Standing.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CPET 49000 - Senior Design Project I


    An extensive individual design and/or analytical project performed in consultation with one or more faculty advisors. Collaboration with representatives of industry, government agencies, or community institutions is encouraged. Evidence of extensive and thorough laboratory performance is required. Phase I includes, but is not limited to (1) faculty acceptance of project proposal, (2) defining and limiting project objectives, (3) initial research and source contacts, (4) project proposal management, (5) procurement of materials, and (6) periodic progress reports.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Senior Class Standing.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Department permission required.
  
  •  

    CPET 49100 - Senior Design Project II


    Phase II includes, but is not limited to (1) continued research and finalized design, (2) project management process, (3) project analysis, design, modeling and prototyping, and testing, (4) oral presentation to faculty and other interested parties, (5) standard-format written technical report.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CPET 49000.

    Cr. 2.
  
  •  

    CPET 49300 - Wireless Networking


    This course covers both theoretical issues related to wireless networking and practical systems for both wireless data networks and cellular wireless telecommunication systems. Students will also work on a project that addresses some recent issues in wireless and mobile networking.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CPET 35500.

    Cr. 3.
    Hours
    Class 2, Lab. 2.
  
  •  

    CPET 49900 - Computer Engineering Technology


    An extensive individual design, special topics course, research, and/or analytical project in any one of the following areas: networking operating systems, computer networking, distributed computing, client/server applications, wireless communications, wide area network design, network system management, computer and network security. Internet system programming and industrial applications of networking, control, and monitoring. Collaboration with representatives of industry, government agencies, or community institutions is encouraged.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Permission by Instructor.

    Cr. 1-4.
    Notes
    Hours and subject matter to be arranged by staff. Repeatable up to 12 credits.
  
  •  

    CPET 56500 - Mobile Computing Systems


    An introduction of the system architecture, technologies, and applications of mobile computing. Topics covered include: mobile and wireless environment; mobile device technology; mobile computing architecture and protocols; mobile computing security; and applications in wireless and mobile computing, including distribution applications, mobile middle-ware, mobile information and database access, mobile multimedia, and remote execution. A combination of lectures, reading, presentation and reports, case studies, and group discussions is used.

    Preparation for Course
    P: B.S. Degree in CS, EET, CPT, or EE, or Senior/Graduate Standing and Permission of Instructor. Must Be Familiar with Basic Concepts in Operating Systems and Networks.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CPET 57500 - Management of Technology


    An introduction of the conceptual foundation of and the method for managing technology and innovation. Topics includes technology and society; technology development infrastructure; technology and strategy; technology competitive analysis, forecasting and assessment; techniques for dealing with risk, uncertainty and change; tools and best practices for technology lifecycle management; government, societal, and international issues. A combination of lectures, reading, presentation and reports, a variety of case studies, and group discussions is used.

    Preparation for Course
    P: B.S. Degree in EET, CPT, or EE or Senior/Graduate Standing and Permission of Instuctor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CPET 58100 - Workshop In Computer Engineering Technology


    Advanced study of technical and professional topics. Emphasis is on new developments relating to technical, operational, and training aspects of industry and technology education.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CPET 59000 - Special Problems in IT and Advanced Computer Applications


    Independent study of a special problem under the guidance of a member of the staff (or, the student’s academic advisor). 

    Cr. 1-6.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    Does not substitute for either M.S. thesis or M.S. project credit.
  
  •  

    CRIM 10100 - The American Criminal Justice System


    Introduction to the criminal justice system of the U. S. and its function in contemporary society.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    The American Criminal Justice System, CRIM 10100 (formerly PPOL 10100), is a prerequisite for all other criminal justice courses.
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  •  

    CRIM 20100 - Theoretical Foundations Of Criminal Justice Policies


    This course examines the impact of sociological, biological, and economic theories of crime and the practice of criminal justice. Focus is upon the nature and importance of theory, context of theoretical developments, methods for the critical analysis of theoretical developments, and policy implications of the varying perspectives considered.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CRIM 10100 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CRIM 20200 - Research Methods In Criminal Justice


    Course examines basic concepts of criminal justice. Students become familiar with research techniques necessary for systematic analysis of the criminal justice system, offender behavior, crime trends, and program effectiveness. Students will learn to critically evaluate existing research. Students will become familiar with existing sources of criminal justice data and will learn to assess the quality of that data.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CRIM 10100 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CRIM 20600 - The Criminal Courts


    An analysis of the criminal justice process from prosecution through appeal. The organization and operation of felony and misdemeanor courts are examined. Topics include prosecutorial decision-making; plea-bargaining; judicial selection; and the conduct of trials, sentencing, and appeal.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CRIM 10100 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Replaced PPOL 30600, The Criminal Courts, for fall 2021.
  
  •  

    CRIM 22200 - Introduction To Criminalistics


    The broad range of physical evidence developed through the investigative process, and methods of identifying and establishing validity and relevance through forensic laboratory techniques.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CRIM 10100 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Replaced PPOL 32201, Introduction To Criminalistics, for fall 2021.
  
  •  

    CRIM 22900 - Ethical Issues In Criminal Justice


    This course focuses on ethical principles and responsibilities of key players in the justice system. Moral and ethical dilemmas are analyzed. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: CRIM 10100 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CRIM 23100 - Corrections


    This course examines the historical development of the U.S. correctional system; the study of administration of local, state, and federal corrections programs, including jails, probation, community corrections, and prisons. Includes the study of punishment rationales, current correctional policies, and possibilities for reform.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CRIM 10100 with grade of C- or better. 

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Replaced PPOL 33100, Corrections, for fall 2021.
  
  •  

    CRIM 24600 - Substantive Criminal Law


    The development, limitations, and application of substantive criminal law utilizing the case-study method.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CRIM 10100 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Replaced PPOL 30100, Substantive Criminal Law, for fall 2021.
  
  •  

    CRIM 30000 - Statistical Techniques


    An introduction to statistics. Nature of statistical data. Ordering and manipulation of data. Measures of central tendency and dispersion. Elementary probability. Concepts of statistical inference decision. Estimation and hypothesis testing. Special topics discussed may include regression and correlation, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods.

    Preparation for Course
    P: MA 14000, MA 15300 or MA 22900.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Credit given for only one of the following: CRIM 30000, ECON 27000, SOC 35100, POL 39500, PSY 20100, or STAT 30100.
  
  •  

    CRIM 30200 - Procedural Criminal Law


    Criminal law application and procedure from the initiation of police activity through the correctional process utilizing the case-study method.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CRIM 10100 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CRIM 30500 - Juvenile Justice


    This course is designed to provide an overview of the justice system’s response to abused, neglected, and dependent children; juvenile misconduct; and delinquent behavior. An extensive review of the development of recent legal changes to the court, options for prevention, treatment of juvenile offenders, and possible system reforms.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CRIM 10100 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CRIM 32100 - American Policing


    This course will examine the history, evolution, and organization of policing in the United States. Emphasis is placed on such major contemporary issues as the police role, discretion, use of force, corruption, accountability, and community.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CRIM 10100 with grade of C- or better. 

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CRIM 33900 - Victimology


     A study of the history, theory, and patterns of criminal and other forms of victimization, impact of victimization, and the justice system response policies and practices.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CRIM 10100 (or equivalent).

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CRIM 34800 - Criminal Investigation


    Theory of investigation, crime-scene procedures, interviews, interrogations, surveillances, and sources of information; collection and preservation of physical evidence; investigative techniques in specific crimes.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CRIM 10100 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Replaced PPOL 32001, Criminal Investigation, for fall 2021.
  
  •  

    CRIM 37000 - Seminar In Criminal Justice


    Selected contemporary topics in criminal justice.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CRIM 10100 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    CRIM 43900 - Crime And Public Policy


    A detailed examination of the major efforts designed to control or reduce crime. A review of existing knowledge is followed by an investigation of current crime control theories, proposals, and programs.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CRIM 10100 with grade of C- or better and senior class standing, or consent of instructor. 

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CRIM 46000 - Police In The Community


    In-depth examination of crime as an urban policy problem, focusing on the role of police and victims in defining crime as a policy problem, and their role in seeking to reduce the incidence of crime.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CRIM 10100 with grade of C- or better.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CRIM 48000 - Internship In Criminal Justice


    Students may be placed with various criminal justice agencies for assignment to a defined task relevant to their educational interests. Tasks may involve staff work or research. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: CRIM 10100 with grade of C- or better. Instructor approval required. 

    Cr. 1-6.
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credit hours.
    Pass/No Pass grades assigned.
  
  •  

    CS 10500 - Computer Science Success Seminar


    This course supports students in their transition to Computer Science programs. It provides an overview of what the programs in the CS department entail, the expectations, and guidelines on how to be successful. This class sets a baseline for professionalism as a student and a future employee while fostering connections between peers, campus, departments, faculty, and research. Students shall learn applications of the degree programs and the various opportunities for advancement as a CS student.

    Cr. 1.
  
  •  

    CS 11200 - Computer Science For Everyone


    This course is designed to provide a broad and realistic idea of what computer professionals do and how they do it.  Designed to be accessible to all students, it will prepare them for later computing courses, including software development courses. The course may introduce programming concepts and programming languages. Students will be introduced to various professional opportunities and work environments. Current topics in computer science as they relate to society and automation will be covered. Students will leave the course with a basic understanding and appreciation of automation and computer science.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 11400 - Introduction To Visual Programming


    This course introduces programming using a visual approach. Students will learn the syntax and structure of an object-oriented programming language. They will develop stand-alone, event-driven, graphical user interface (GUI) applications for personal computer use.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 16000 - Introduction To Computer Science I


    An introduction to the fundamental concepts and techniques of Computer Science. Students will learn to program using an object-oriented language. They will learn how to translate a real problem into a program description, and how to write and test a program to implement their description. The emphasis will be on developing a professional style at an elementary level. CS 16000 will carry syntax as far as interacting classes, arrays of one dimension, and simple file i/o. 

    Preparation for Course
    P: MA 15300.

    Cr. 4.
    Notes
    Students with no programming background should instead consider CS 11200.
  
  •  

    CS 16100 - Introduction To Computer Science II


    This course continues CS 16000. Students will design larger programs to solve more complicated problems. The emphasis is on deepening students’ abilities to deal with abstraction, problem decomposition, and the interaction between program components. Students will develop their professional practice through analysis of more general problems, debugging and testing of their programs, and written presentation of their solutions. Topics include multidimensional arrays, event-driven programs, GUI’s, class inheritance and interfaces, and libraries.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 16000.

    Cr. 4.
  
  •  

    CS 20300 - Advanced Visual Programming


    This course continues the study of visual programming begun in CS 11400. Students will create multi-tier, event-driven applications using object-oriented approaches and databases. Students will also create applications. Students will be introduced to data structures.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS11400 or IST 14000 or ECET 11400.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 22700 - Introduction To C Programming


    Introduction to programming in C to solve engineering problems. Topics include primitive data types, control structures, standard input/output, file input/output, mathematic library, procedural programming, problem-solving, user-defined functions, arrays, and pointers.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGR 12800 or Permission of Instructor.

    Cr. 2.
  
  •  

    CS 23200 - Introduction To C And Unix


    This course is an introduction to the C language and the Unix operating system. It presumes fluency in a high-level language. The course will focus on standard C and Unix tools, rather than a proprietary version of either. C topics include data types, the syntax for arithmetic, logical and relational functions, control functions, scope, communications with the shell, file i/o, pointers, arrays, structs, typedefs, macro and preprocessor functions, and the use of libraries and multiple source files. Unix topics include the file and directory structures, permissions, shells, standard tools such as history, sort, vi, grep, sed, tar, and make, and simple shell scripting.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 16100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 26000 - Data Structures


    This course is an introduction to the common data structures (ADT’s) of computer science and the algorithms which maintain and operate on them. These include arrays, stacks, queues, linked lists, trees, graphs, and more general structures like maps and dictionaries. The relevant algorithms include additions, deletions, sorts, searches, traversals, and others appropriate to the structure. The course includes an introduction to the prediction and testing of algorithm performance.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 16100 and MA 17500.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 27100 - Computer Architecture


    Introduction to computer organization and architecture. Fundamentals of digital logic and representation of numeric and nonnumeric data. Assembly-level organization and programming, including instruction formats, addressing modes, and subprogram call/return. Design of main memory, cache memory, and virtual memory. Interrupt basics, interrupt-driven I/O, DMA, and bus protocols. Processor organization, data paths, the control unit, micriprogramming, pipelining, and performance enhancements. Multiprocessor and alternative architectures.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 16100 and MA 17500.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 27400 - Data Communications


    A survey of data communication techniques. Topics include communications media, synchronous and asynchronous transmission, coding, error detection and correction, communications protocols and formats, modulation and demodulation, multiplexing and networking, and the OSI model with emphasis on the physical and data link layers.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 16100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 29200 - Intermediate Topics In Computer Science


    Intermediate seminar addressing current topics or issues in computer science or information systems.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Permission of Instructor

    Cr. 2-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  •  

    CS 29500 - Industrial Practicum


    Practical problems in local industry limited to about 10 to 20 hours per week for which the student may receive some remuneration. 

    Preparation for Course
    C: Sophomore Class Standing Required.

    Cr. 1.
    Notes
    Pass/Not Pass grades assigned.
    May be repeated but the total combined credit that may be applied to a degree is limited to 3.
    Open only to full-time students.
  
  •  

    CS 30600 - Computers In Society


    Case study analysis of the social impacts of computerization and networking. Topics include computer ethics, crime, privacy, security, reliability, and vulnerability. Other topics include cyberphilia, cyberphobia, censorship, depersonalization, disenfranchisement, automated decision making, artificial intelligence, cognitive science, and ergonomics. Students present projects applying these issues to today’s environment.

    Preparation for Course
    C: Junior Class Standing Required.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 32100 - Introduction To Computer Graphics


    This is an introductory course in computer graphics. This course introduces fundamental concepts of computer graphics technology and principles to create three-dimensional graphics. Fundamental graphics algorithms are discussed, as well as graphics programming, using a modern graphics standard. Students are expected to complete several programming assignments that implement fundamental computer graphics techniques in the Unix operating system environment.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 26000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 33100 - Introduction To C++ And Object-Oriented Programming


    An introduction to the C++ language with emphasis on features supporting object-oriented programming. Fundamental data type and operations. Expression evaluation. Selection and iteration constraints. Functions, procedures, and macro. Standard libraries. Classes: declaration and definition; instances; member functions; constructors and destructors; function overloading; inheritance and polymorphism. Stream input and output. Using classes to encapsulate date structure and implementation details.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 26000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 35000 - Programming Language Design


    A survey of language design issues and their implications for translation and run-time support. Examination of modern programming languages and features: Abstract data and control structures, procedures, parameter passing mechanisms, block structuring and scope rules, input/output, concurrent execution, and storage management. Models of run time behavior. Comparison of imperative and declarative programming languages.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 26000 and CS 27100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 36000 - Software Engineering


    An introduction to software engineering using an object-oriented approach. The software development process. Iterative and incremental development. Team organization aod project management. Object-oriented analysis and design. Representation of software models using UML: use cases, class and interaction diagram. Metrics for design evaluation. Software quality assurance. Testing planning and specification; unit and integration test methods. Software tools for analysis and design. Ethics and professionalism.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 26000.

    Cr. 4.
  
  •  

    CS 36400 - Introduction To Database Systems


    Theory and application of database systems for information organization and retrieval based on the relational model. Includes database models, query languages, data dependencies, normal forms, and database design. Projects include use of commercial mainframe and microcomputer database software.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 26000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 36500 - Advanced Database Systems


    The first part of the course includes theory of SQL, implementation of some components of DBMS, and a comprehensive project. The second part of the course includes more advanced topics such as recovery; concurrency; and distributed, deductive, and knowledge databases.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 36400 or IST 27000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 36800 - Human-Computer Interaction


    Introduction to general issues surrounding human-computer interaction (HCI). The course presents principles, design methodologies, tools, and evaluation techniques with an emphasis on human-centered interface design and implementation. Other issues covered include HCI aspects of multimedia systems, World Wide Web, computer-supported cooperative work, and recent paradigms of HCI.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 26000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 37200 - Web Application Development


    Introduction to Web application development. Characteristics of Web and application servers; Web engineering principles and application architectures; Web page construction; client and server-side scripting; database interaction; Web application deployment and management; security and performance issues; overview of application-layer protocols.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 27400 or 37400.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 37400 - Computer Networks


    The design and implementation of data communications networks. Topics include network topologies; message, circuit and packet switching; broadcast, satellite and local area networks; routing; the OSI model with emphasis on the network, transport, and session layers.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 16100 or Equivalent.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 38000 - Artificial Intelligence


    Fundamental concepts and techniques of artificial intelligence. Search techniques, including local search and constraint satisfaction. Knowledge representation concepts and methods of reasoning. Software agents, machine learning and neural networks, and AI planning systems.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 26000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 38400 - Numerical Analysis


    Iterative methods for solving nonlinear equations; direct and iterative methods for solving linear systems; interpolation and extrapolation; approximation of derivatives, integrals, and functions; numerical techniques for ordinary differential equations; error analysis. Use of mathematical subroutine libraries.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  CS16000 and MA 16600.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 42100 - Advanced Computer Graphics


    Advanced topics in computer graphics such as three-dimensional rendering, curve and surface design, antialiasing, animation, and visualization. Other topics will be selected depending on current research trends. Through development of projects, students will gain practical experience about modern computer graphics.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 32100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 44500 - Computer Security


    A survey of the fundamentals of computer security. Topics include risks and vulnerabilities, policy formation, controls and protection methods, survey of malicious logic, database security, encryption, authentication, intrusion detection, network and system security issues, personnel and physical security issues, security design principles, issues of law and privacy.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 23200, and CS 27100, and CS 37400.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 45700 - Introduction To Data Mining


    Data mining refers to the process of automatic discovery of patterns and knowledge from large data sets. As an introductory course on data mining, this course presents the knowledge discovery process, and introduces data preprocessing and exploration, major data mining tasks, the relevant methodologies and techniques, and data mining applications from different disciplines.

    Preparation for Course
    P:  CS 36400 or IST 27000, and STAT 51100 or 30100, or consent of instructor. Junior or senior class standing required.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 46000 - Senior Capstone Project I


    The first course of a two-semester sequence. Student teams will participate in the development of a substantial application-oriented or research-oriented software project utilizing a formal software process model. Emphasis on teamwork, project management, and oral and written communication. Student teams will conduct review activities and develop artifacts appropriate for the software project and process model chosen.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 36000 And ENGL 23401, or ENGL W234 or Equivalent; Senior Class Standing Required.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 46500 - Senior Capstone Project II


    The second course of a two-semester sequence. Student teams will complete the development of a substantial application-oriented or research-oriented software project begun in CS 46000. Emphasis on teamwork, project management, and oral and written communication. Student teams will conduct review activities and develop artifacts appropriate for the software project and process model chosen. Students will be required to conduct a final formal review and demonstration to project stakeholders and other interested persons.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 46000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 46600 - Strategic Issues For Information Systems


    Topics in information systems management including strategic planning for competitive advantage, charge-back, systems portfolio risk analysis, security, and assimilating technology advances. Students develop an information systems strategic plan.

    Preparation for Course
    P: Senior Standing Required in IS or CS, And ENGL 23401.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 46700 - Project Management


    Covers the techniques required to manage systems development. Topics include project proposal, planning, estimating, organizing, controlling, and completion. Students practice these techniques on a major project using project management software.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS majors with Senior Class Stading.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    CS 47200 - Operating Systems Design


    The design and implementation of modern multiprocessing operating systems. Topics include concurrent programming, real and virtual storage allocation, resource allocation and deadlock prevention and avoidance, job scheduling, and analytic modeling. Students will complete projects involving concurrency and implement a portion of a multiprocessing operating system.

    Preparation for Course
    P: CS 23200 and 27100.

    Cr. 3.
 

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