Oct 07, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order.

Standard information for each course includes the number, title, and credits (sometimes called credit hours or semester hours). For some courses, you will find information on the hours of class, laboratory, or studio for which the course is scheduled in each week of a regular semester; these weekly hours are expanded during summer sessions. Fees for courses are assessed on the basis of credits and other factors.

The course-numbering system generally suggests levels of difficulty and appropriateness. Courses at the 100 and 200 levels comprise introductory offerings and those are most commonly taken by freshmen and sophomores. Courses at the 300 and 400 levels are primarily for juniors and seniors. In some Purdue programs, undergraduates take courses at the 500 level, but generally courses numbered 500 and above are for graduate students.

Preparation for courses is indicated as follows:

P: indicates a prerequisite that must precede your enrollment in the course described. You may find one or more specific course numbers, the number of credits you should already have in a subject, a placement-test level, or other conditions.

C: indicates a corequisite that must be taken no later than the same semester in which you take the course described.

R: indicates a recommendation concerning conditions to be met for enrollment in the course.

When no subject code is shown for prerequisites, corequisites, and recommended courses, they are in the same subject area as the course being described. If you lack a prerequisite or corequisite, or if you wish to take a course numbered at a higher level than your present status, you should seek the department’s or instructor’s consent to enroll in the course.

V.T. means Variable Title and is shown for courses for which the title may be changed to specify the topic or other special focus of each offering.

Purdue University Fort Wayne reserves the right to add, withdraw, or change courses without notice.

 

 
  
  •  

    POL 10900 - Introduction to International Relations


    Causes of war, nature, and attributes of the state, imperialism, international law, national sovereignty, arbitration, adjudication, international organization, major international issues.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Indiana Core Transfer Library course. [Credit not given for both POL 10900.]
    Subject Area
    [PSIR] International Relations
  
  •  

    POL 15001 - Foundations of Community Advocacy


    This course will prepare students to learn more than the basic structure of government. It will prepare students to learn the historical and philosophical foundations of our democracy and to question long-established ideas. It is designed to prepare a person to develop the skills necessary to be a community leader.

    Cr. 1-3.
  
  •  

    POL 20001 - Contemporary Political Topics


    Extensive analysis of selected contemporary political problems. Topics vary from semester to semester and are listed in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

    Cr. 1-6,
    Hours
    Lab. 0-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  •  

    POL 20300 - The Promise and Problems of Democracy


    An examination of the promise and problems of democratic governance and civic education. The course introduces students to the fundamental issues of democratic politics through a close reading of classic texts in the history of political  philosophy. Students will also engage in a discussion of the requirements for the establishment and maintenance of a democratic political order in the United States through an exploration of key arguments from the Founding to the present era.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSPP] Political Philosophy
  
  •  

    POL 20500 - Analyzing Politics


    Introduces the approaches and techniques used to study politics.  Includes an introduction to social science language, concepts and critical research skills.  Overview of political science research and approaches, including case study, surveys, and model-building.  Emphasizes skills such as interpreting the presentation of data in charts, graphs, and tables, and elementary analysis of qualitative and quantitative data.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 13100, or placement in ENGL 14000.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    This course may be used to fulfill the Arts and Sciences writing requirement.
  
  •  

    POL 20700 - Elements of Political Analysis


    This course is an introduction to the approaches and practices of political science. It provides an overview of disciplinary language, concepts, research techniques, and methodological debates. It also teaches students how good writing, strong argumentation, and sound methodological understanding can be combined to produce high-quality political science papers.

    Preparation for Course
    P: ENGL 13100, or placement in ENGL 14000.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    This course may be used to fulfill the Arts and Sciences writing requirement.
  
  •  

    POL 20800 - Scandals and Conspiracy Theories


    Examination of the history, politics and political consequences of American political scandals with an emphasis on more recent events (from Watergate to the present). Causes and effects of secret society and religious conspiracism in American and international politics are also investigated in great detail.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    POL 21100 - Introduction to Law


    An introduction to law as a method for dealing with social problems and as an aspect of the social and political system. An introduction to legal reasoning, procedures, and materials. Will usually include comparison of United States and other societies and their approaches to law.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 21200 - Making Democracy Work


    Nature and justifications for democratic politics and the problems confronting democracy today. demise of liberalism in America; rise of identity politics and its significance; racial inequality and the problems of deliberative democracy; problems of political alienation and participation.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM]
  
  •  

    POL 21300 - Introduction To Public Policy


    Studies the processes and institutions involved in the formation of public policy, with particular reference to the United States. The course will identify key policy actors, analyze the process of policy-making, and critically assess selected policy issues (such as foreign, defense, economic, welfare, and environmental policy).

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    POL 25200 - Sports and Public Policy


    Introduction to fundamental concepts of public policy analysis through prism of interscholastic, collegiate and professional sports. Subjects generally include governance structures of American sports leagues, economics of professional sports, politics of public subsidies for stadium construction, and sociological implications of American sports.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM]
  
  •  

    POL 27500 - Politics and Film


    Course investigates how various political institutions, processes, problems and individuals have been portrayed on screen; also covers politics of movie industry, including film censorship and electoral interventions. Topics from all subfields of political science possible, but emphasis is on American politics and international relations.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 28500 - Science and Politics


    Analysis of uses and misuses of natural and social scientific expertise in politics. Implications of scientific method and experimental results studied in depth. Topics include: global climate change, biotechnology, teaching evolution in public schools and epidemiological controversies.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 30101 - Political Parties and Interest Groups


    Examination and evaluation of the behavior of political parties, voters, interest groups, and other institutions and procedures by which Americans try to control their government.

    Preparation for Course
    P: POL 10300 or consent of instructor.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 30201 - Public Bureaucracy in Modern Society


    Examines public bureaucracy, with special emphasis on the United States, as a political phenomenon engaging in policy making and in the definition of the terms of policy issues. Considers the role of bureaucratic instruments in promoting social change and in responding to it.

     

    Cr. 3
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics

  
  •  

    POL 30301 - Policy Making in the United States


    Processes and institutions involved in formation of public policy in a democratic society, with emphasis on American experience.

    Preparation for Course
    P: POL 10300 or consent of instructor.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 30401 - Constitutional Law


    American political powers and structures; selected Supreme Court decisions interpreting American constitutional system.

    Preparation for Course
    P: POL 10300 or equivalent and consent of instructor.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Dual Level Course
    Eligible for graduate credit.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 30501 - Constitutional Rights and Liberties


    Extent and limits of constitutional rights; selected Supreme Court decisions interpreting American constitutional system.

    Preparation for Course
    P: POL 10300 or equivalent and consent of instructor.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 30601 - State Politics in the United States


    Comparative study of politics in the American states. Special emphasis on the impact of political culture, party systems, legislatures, and bureaucracies upon public policies.

    Preparation for Course
    P: POL 10300 or consent of instructor.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 30701 - Indiana State Government and Politics


    Constitutional foundations, political development, organizational and functional process and growth, and current problems of Indiana government as a focal point for understanding role of states as instruments of social policy. Readings, case studies, problems.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 30801 - Urban Politics


    Political behavior in modern American communities; emphasizes the impact of municipal organization, city officials and bureaucracies, social and economic notables, political parties, interest groups, the general public, and protest organizations on urban policy outcomes.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 31300 - Envronmental Policy


    Examines the causes of environmental problems and the political, economic, social, and institutional questions raised by designing and implementing effective policy responses to these problems.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 31700 - Voting, Elections, and Public Opinion


    Determinants of voting behavior in elections. The nature of public opinion on major domestic and foreign policy issues; development of political ideology; other influences on the voting choices of individuals and the outcomes of elections; relationship among public opinion, elections, and the development of public policy.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 31800 - The American Presidency


    Development of the presidency and its relationship to the political system; problems of the contemporary presidency; personality and presidential roles, with emphasis on political leadership.

    Preparation for Course
    P: POL 10300 or consent of instructor.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    [Credit not given for both POL 31800.]
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 31900 - The United States Congress


    Congress is both a policy-making institution and a body of professional politicians representing state and local interests. This course examines Congress within the frameworks created by making each of these goals paramount. The conflicts and contrasts that arise in interpretation and evaluation of Congress by the differences in these points of view are explored.

    Preparation for Course
    P: POL 10300 or consent of instructor.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 32001 - Judicial Politics


    Examines the American judicial system in the contemporary context. Analysis of the trial and appellate courts with a focus on the United States Supreme Court. Topics include analysis of the structure of the judicial system, the participants in the system, and the policy-making processes and capabilities of the legal system. The course concludes with an assessment of the role of courts in a majoritarian democracy.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 32400 - Gender and Politics


    Analysis of gender and sexual orientation in contemporary political systems, domestic or foreign, with emphasis on political roles, participation, and public policy. Normative or empirical examination of how political systems affect different genders and the impact of people with different genders or sexual orientations on the system(s). Topics vary by semester. May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  •  

    POL 32800 - Women and the Law


    Exploration of origins and underlying rationale of women’s status in the American legal tradition and the role that law plays in helping to shape political climate and structure of the nation. Course will provide basic knowledge of various fields of law as they pertain to women.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 33101 - British Politics


    Governmental structure and political behavior of contemporary Britain, with emphasis on process and policies.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    POL 33501 - Western European Politics


    Development, structure, and functioning of political systems in Western Europe. Political dynamics of European integration.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSCO] Comparative Politics
  
  •  

    POL 33900 - Middle Eastern Politics


    Political culture and change in selected Middle Eastern and North African countries. Topics include political elites, traditional cultures, modern political ideology, institutions of political control, conflict management, and social reform policies.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by Arts and Sciences for the Cultural Studies (Non-Western Culture) requirement.
    Subject Area
    [PSCO] Comparative Politics
    Dual Level Course
    Eligible for graduate credit.
  
  •  

    POL 34000 - East European Politics


    Compares political change in the East European states, and emphasizes the legacies of authoritarianism and communism and the post-communist transition to democracy. Topics include the building of political institutions, the inclusion of citizens into the polity, the reform of the economy, the management of ethnic and social conflicts, and integration into the European Union.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by Arts and Sciences for the Cultural Studies (Non-Western Culture) Requirement.
    Subject Area
    [PSCO] Comparative Politics
    Dual Level Course
    Eligible for graduate credit.
  
  •  

    POL 35001 - Politics of the Euoropean Union


    Study of the politics of the European Union (EU). Assesses past and present dynamics of economic and political integration in Europe, the structure and work of European Union institutions, and EU public policies such as the Single Market, the common currency, common foreign and security policy, and trade.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Dual Level Course

    Eligible for graduate credit.
    Subject Area
    [PSCO] Comparative Politics
  
  •  

    POL 35501 - Ethnic Conflict and Nationalism


    Causes, dynamics, and management of contemporary ethnic conflict. Origins and political mobilization of nationalism. analyzes ethnic conflicts of varying intensity. Explores liberal management strategies including power-sharing, assimilation, integration, and partition. Based on comparative study of cases drawn from around the world.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSCO] Comparative Politics
  
  •  

    POL 36001 - U.S. Foreign Policy


    Mechanics of the foreign-policy-making process in the United States. Analysis of competing concepts of the national interest; isolationism, the Open Door, Monroe Doctrine, national security, containment, military and political alliances, the new nations; their relation to substantive policies and to the character of American democracy.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 37101 - Workshop in International Topics


    Includes such topics as development of the international system, politics of food and populations, law of the sea, human rights, trade, U.S. foreign policy, United Nations issues, etc. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

    Cr. 1-3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Subject Area
    [PSIR] International Relations
    Dual Level Course
    Eligible for graduate credit.
  
  •  

    POL 37500 - War & International Conflict


    The nature of war. Theories and evidence on the causes of war. Discussion of the ways in which war has been conceived and perceived across time and of methods employed to study the phenomenon of war.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSIR] International Relations
  
  •  

    POL 37600 - International Political Economy


    Theories about the interaction between the international economic and political systems are the subject of this course. Specific topics covered will include (among others) the politics of trade, aid, foreign investment, and international monetary affairs; theories of dependency and imperialism; the politics of international competition in specific industries; the stability/instability of international economic regimes.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSIR] International Relations
  
  •  

    POL 37800 - Problems in Public Policy


    Examines various substantive problems in the formulation and conceptualization of public policy. Both the policy and its impact are considered in the context of the entire political environment in which it operates. Examples are selected from various levels of government, not always confined to the United States. May be repeated once for credit.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 38100 - Classical Political Thought


    An exposition and critical analysis of the major political philosophers and philosophical schools. I. From Plato to Machiavelli. II. From Machiavelli to the present.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by Arts and Sciences for the Cultural Studies (Western Tradition) requirement.
    Subject Area
    [PSPP] Political Philosophy
    Dual Level Course
    Eligible for graduate credit.
  
  •  

    POL 38200 - Modern Political Thought


    An exposition and critical analysis of the major political philosophers and philosophical schools. I. From Plato to Machiavelli. II. From Machiavelli to the present.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Approved by Arts and Sciences for the Cultural Studies (Western Tradition) requirement.
    Subject Area
    [PSPP] Political Philosophy
    Dual Level Course
    Eligible for graduate credit.
  
  •  

    POL 38300 - Foundations Of American Political Thought


    American political ideas from the colonial period to the founding period.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSPP] Political Philosophy
    Dual Level Course
    Eligible for graduate credit.
  
  •  

    POL 38400 - Developments In American Political Thought


    American political ideas from the founding period to the present.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSPP] Political Philosophy
    Dual Level Course
    Eligible for graduate credit.
  
  •  

    POL 39400 - Public Policy Analysis


    Place of theory and method in examining public policies in relation to programs, institutional arrangements, and constitutional problems. Particular reference to American political experience.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    Dual Level Course

    Eligible for graduate credit.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 39500 - Quantitative Political Analysis


    Introduction to methods and statistics used in political inquiry, including measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, sampling, statistical inference and hypothesis testing, measures of association, analysis of variance, and regression.

    Preparation for Course
    P: MA 15300 or MA 16800 (or equivalent), or consent of instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    POL 39700 - Intervention, Peace, and War


    Examines international intervention that is at least nominally humanitarian. Explores changing norms and laws on sovereignty and intervention, including the responsibility to protect. Topics include military intervention, UN and non-UN peace operations, economic sanctions, arms embargoes, humanitarian relief operations, and judicial investigations and prosecutions.

    Cr. 3.
    Subject Area
    [PSIR] International Relations
  
  •  

    POL 39800 - Internship in Urban Institutions


    This course is designed to provide opportunities for students to observe or participate directly in the policymaking process of those urban institutions requesting the assistance of paraprofessionals. Research and written reports are required. Evaluations will be made by both the agency and the instructor. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Students working in city and county institutions may repeat the course.

    Preparation for Course
    P: consent of instructor.

    Cr. 1-6.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 40101 - Studies in Political Science


    Topic varies with the instructor and year; consult the Schedule of Classes for current information. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  •  

    POL 48000 - Undergraduate Readings in Political Science


    Individual readings and research.

    Preparation for Course
    P: consent of instructor.

    Cr. 1-6.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  •  

    POL 48200 - Practicum


    Faculty-directed study of aspects of the political process based upon field experience. Directed readings, field research, research papers. May be repeated for credit.

    Preparation for Course
    P: consent of instructor.

    Cr. 1-6.
    Subject Area
    [PSAM] American Politics
  
  •  

    POL 49001 - Senior Seminar in Political Science


    Open to senior majors and others with consent of instructor. Readings and discussion of selected problems; research paper ordinarily required. May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.

    Preparation for Course
    P: POL 20700 or consent of instructor.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  •  

    PPOL 10100 - The American Criminal Justice System


    Introduction to the criminal justice system of the United States and its function in contemporary society.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    The American Criminal Justice System 10100 is a prerequisite for all other criminal justice courses.

    Indiana Core Transfer Library course.
  
  •  

    PPOL 12000 - Contemporary Health Issues


    An examination of current public health, environmental health, and health service delivery issues in the United States. Topics include the organization and costs of health systems, access to care, and the interrelationships between risk factors and health; also environmental challenges facing our society and their impact on health.

    Cr. 1-3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 16200 - Environment and People


    An interdisciplinary examination of the problems of population, pollution, and natural resources and their implications for society.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 17000 - Introduction to Public Affairs


    Broad coverage of public affairs through critical and analytical inquiry into policy-making at all levels of government. Particular emphasis on intergovernmental relations as they affect policy in the federal system.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 20100 - Theoretical Foundations of Criminal Justice Policies


    This course examines the impact of sociological, biological, and economic theories of crime and the practice of criminal justice. Focus is upon the nature and importance of theory, context of theoretical developments, methods for the critical analysis of theoretical developments, and policy implications of the varying perspectives considered.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 10100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 20200 - Criminal Justice Data, Methods, and Resources


    Course examines basic concepts of criminal justice. Students become familiar with research techniques necessary for systematic analysis of the criminal justice system, offender behavior, crime trends, and program effectiveness. Students will learn to critically evaluate existing research. Students will become familiar with existing sources of criminal justice data and will learn to assess the quality of that data.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 10100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 22100 - Nonprofit And Voluntary Sector


    This course provides a broad overview of the U.S. nonprofit sector. Topics include the sector’s size and scope and its religious, historical, and theoretical underpinnings. It also examines perspectives on why people organize, donate to, and volunteer for nonprofit organizations, and looks at current challenges that the sector faces.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 26300 - Public Management


    This course is an examination of the management process in public organizations in the United States. Special attention will be given to external influences on public managers, the effects of the intergovernmental environment, and in particular, problems of management in a democratic, limited government system.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 26400 - Urban Structure and Policy


    An introduction to urban government and public policy issues. Topics include urban government structure and policy making, the economic foundations and development of cities, demography of cities and suburbs, land-use planning, and other selected urban policy problems.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 27200 - Introduction to Environmental Sciences


    Application of principles from the life and physical sciences to the understanding and management of the environment. Emphases will be placed on (1) the physical and biological restraints on resource availability and use, and (2) the technological and scientific options to solving environmental problems.

    Preparation for Course
    P: a statistics course.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 30000 - Statistical Techniques


    An introduction to statistics. Nature of statistical data. Ordering and manipulation of data. Measures of central tendency and dispersion. Elementary probability. Concepts of statistical inference decision. Estimation and hypothesis testing. Special topics discussed may include regression and correlation, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods. Credit given for only one of the following: 30000, ECON 27000, SOC 35100, POL 39500, PSY 20100, STAT 30100.

    Preparation for Course
    P: MA 14000, 15300 or 22900.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 30100 - Substantive Criminal Law


    The development, limitations, and application of substantive criminal law utilizing the casestudy method.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 10100; R: PPOL 20100 and 20200.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 30200 - Procedural Criminal Law


    Criminal law application and procedure from the initiation of police activity through the correctional process utilizing the case-study method.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 10100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 30500 - Juvenile Justice


    This course is designed to provide an overview of the justice system’s response to abused, neglected, and dependent children; juvenile misconduct; and delinquent behavior. An extensive review of the development of recent legal changes to the court, options for prevention, treatment of juvenile offenders, and possible system reforms.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 10100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 30600 - The Criminal Courts


    An analysis of the criminal justice process from prosecution through appeal. The organization and operation of felony and misdemeanor courts are examined. Topics include prosecutorial decision-making; plea-bargaining; judicial selection; and the conduct of trials, sentencing, and appeal.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 10100; R: PPOL 20100 and 20200.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 31600 - Environmental Health Science


    A study of human interaction with the environment and potential impacts of environmental agents on health and safety. Hazards from natural sources and human activities that contaminate our air, land, water, food, homes, neighborhoods, and workplaces are examined. Environmental control activities, including pollution control technology and policy, are also examined.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 32000 - Health Systems Administration


    An overview of the U.S. healthcare delivery system. Examines the organization, function, and role of the system; current system problems; and alternative systems or solutions.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 32001 - Criminal Investigation


    Theory of investigation, crime-scene procedures, interviews, interrogations, surveillances, and sources of information; collection and preservation of physical evidence; investigative techniques in specific crimes.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 10100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 32100 - American Policing


    This course will examine the history, evolution, and organization of policing in the United States. Emphasis is placed on such major contemporary issues as the police role, discretion, use of force, corruption, accountability, and community policing.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 10100; R: PPOL 20100 and 20200.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 32200 - Principles of Epidemiology


    A basic overview of epidemiologic methodology and techniques. Both communicable and chronic disease risk factors will be discussed, along with data acquisition, analysis techniques, and current published epidemiological studies.

    Preparation for Course
    P: MA 14000, 15300 or 22900.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 32201 - Introduction to Criminalistics


    The broad range of physical evidence developed through the investigative process, and methods of identifying and establishing validity and relevance through forensic laboratory techniques.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 10100; R: PPOL 30100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 33100 - Corrections


    This course examines the historical development of the American correctional system; the study of administration of local, state, and federal corrections programs, including jail, probation, community corrections, and prisons. Includes the study of punishment rationales, current correctional policies, and possibilities for reform.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 10100; R: PPOL 20100 and 20200.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 33900 - Legal History And Public Policy


    This course will cover a specific policy issue in American history (such as race relations or political protest/dissent) during specific time periods and focus on the role played by the U. S. Supreme Court in dealing with that issue.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 34800 - Management Science


    Introduction to management-science models and methods for policy analysis and public management. Methods include decision analysis, linear programming queuing analysis, and simulation. Computer-based applications are included.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 30000, MA 14000, 15300 or 22900. Prior familiarization with computers is recommended, though not required.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 35200 - Healthcare Finance I


    First of a two-course sequence on the financial management of healthcare organizations; introduces financial environment of providers and concepts of financial accounting critical to decision-making.  Topics include financial statement analysis (specific emphasis on unique features of healthcare financial statements), accounting and managerial control of cash, accounts receivable, inventory, and budgeting.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 36200 - Nonprofit Management And Leadership


    Students in this experiential course prepare themselves for this field as well as public and private sector jobs that intersect with the nonprofit sector. This course provides an overview of nonprofit management practices, including governance, leadership, planning, performance measurement,
    marketing, finances, ethics, team management, and staff and volunteer relations.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 36500 - Urban Development and Planning


    This course identifies the major problems associated with urban development in the United States and investigates the potential of public planning strategies and tools to deal with these problems. An emphasis is placed on the application of analytical approaches to problem definition and solution.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 26400 and 30000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 36600 - Managing Behavior in Public Organizations


    This course provides an introduction to the management of people in public organizations. Focus is on behavioral science in management and related analytical and experiential applications.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 37000 - Seminar in Criminal Justice


    Selected contemporary topics in criminal justice. May be repeated for credit.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 10100.

    Cr. 3.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
  
  •  

    PPOL 37100 - Human Resource Management in Healthcare Facilities


    This course covers the function of management, which is concerned with the acquisition, development, and use of human resources in the field of healthcare delivery. Labor relations relating to healthcare delivery are also included.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 37101 - Financing Public Affairs


    A survey of economic and political theories of market failures, public expenditure evaluation, economic stabilization, systems of redistribution and fiscal federalism. Examples and applications to contemporary government decisions.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 17000, ECON 20101 and 20201.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 37200 - Government Finance and Budgets


    Study of fiscal management in public agencies, including revenue administration, debt management, and public budgeting.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 37300 - Human Resources Management in the Public Sector


    The organization and operation of public personnel-management systems, with emphasis on concepts and techniques of job analysis, position classification, training, affirmative action, and motivation.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 37600 - Principles of Public Safety


    Examination of threats to public safety and of governmental response at various levels to those threats. Treatments of such areas as transportation and highway threats, occupational safety and health, criminal threats, emergency and disaster planning, consumer protection, and fire control and suppression. Discussion of techniques to identify and measure risk, the acceptability of risk, and governmental attempts to control risk.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 10100.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 37601 - Law and Public Policy


    The purpose of this course is to provide a basic understanding of the origins, process, and impact of law in the making and implementing of public policy. The course’s major objective is to provide students with the substantive concepts necessary to understand the judicial system and law in its various forms.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 37700 - Legal Process and Contemporary Issues in America


    An introduction to the American legal system, including the Constitution, courts system, and administrative law in federal and state agencies. Readings and discussion center around current issues affected by the legal process.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 37601.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 38000 - Internship in Criminal Justice


    Open to interested students who qualify upon approval of the faculty. Students may be placed with various criminal justice agencies for assignment to a defined task relevant to their educational interests. Tasks may involve staff work or research. Full-time participants may earn up to 6 credit hours.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 10100; permission of instructor.

    Cr. 3.
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit. Course is graded S/U (satisfactory/ unsatisfactory).
  
  •  

    PPOL 38001 - Internship - Public Affairs


    Open to interested students upon approval of the faculty. Students are placed with public agencies or governmental units for assignment to a defined task relevant to their educational interests in public affairs. Tasks may involve staff work or research. Full-time participants may earn up to 6 credits.

    Preparation for Course
    P: permission of instructor.

    Cr. 1-6.
    Variable Title
    (V.T.)
    Notes
    May be repeated for credit. Course is graded S/U (satisfactory/unsatisfactory).
  
  •  

    PPOL 39000 - Readings in Public Affairs


    Independent readings and research related to a topic of special interest to the student. Written report required. May be repeated for credit.

    Preparation for Course
    P: permission of instructor.

    Cr. 1-3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 40000 - Topics in Environmental Studies


    An interdisciplinary consideration of specific environmental topics. May be repeated for credit.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 27200.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 40200 - Hospital Administration


    The study of organization, structure, function, and fiscal operations within hospitals. The role of the hospital in the community, relationship to official and voluntary health agencies, coordination of hospital departments and managerial involvement will be examined.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 32000.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 40500 - Public Law and the Legislative Process


    This course focuses on Congress as a policy-making body in the U.S. public law system. It covers the constitutional framework for congressional operations as well as technical aspects of the legislative process such as bill drafting and analysis, the role of leadership, and the prerogatives of individual members.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 40600 - Public Law and the Electoral Process


    The purpose of this course is to facilitate understanding of the interaction of electoral politics and policy. It covers the legal framework of the evolution of the “right” to vote, the impact of the judiciary on the structure of elections, limitations on campaign practices, and the importance of legislative districting and its control.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 40700 - Public Law and Government Relations


    The purpose of this course is to build understanding of government relations work as applied to careers in the field. It covers the historical evolution of the constitutional right to petition the government with an understanding of the limitations imposed on the process. The interaction of public and private sectors is included.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 41100 - Chronic and Long-Term Care Administration


    Administering programs across the continuum of care including nursing homes, hospice, home health, and assisted living; Medicare and Medicaid financing; quality improvement; care management; and needs of special populations, particularly, vulnerable elders.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 41600 - Environmental Health Policy


    Study of professional requirements and duties of the environmental health functions within health agencies; consideration of applicable laws and standards in each environmental health function; environmental evaluation, implementation, and personnel responsibilities.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 42200 - The Social Epidemics: AIDS, Violence, and Substance Abuse


    This course examines HIV/AIDS, violence, and substance abuse in the context of racial, gender, sexual orientation, and class dynamics that may underlie the way these pathologies affect certain populations. Emphasized is the recognition that how we define disease and causation can influence how we attempt to find a cure.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 43900 - Crime and Public Policy


    A detailed examination of the major efforts designed to control or reduce crime. A review of existing knowledge is followed by an investigation of current crime control theories, proposals, and programs.

    Preparation for Course
    P: PPOL 10100; senior standing or consent of instructor.

    Cr. 3.
  
  •  

    PPOL 44100 - Legal Aspects of Healthcare Administration


    An overview of the liability and legal responsibility, as well as legal recourse healthcare facilities may exercise. This course will discuss policies and standards relating to health facility administration. Also included is a discussion of financial aspects unique to the hospital/healthcare facility environment, such as third-party payments and federal assistance.

    Cr. 3.
 

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