Oct 18, 2021  
Undergraduate Bulletin 2006-2008 
    
Undergraduate Bulletin 2006-2008 [Archived Catalog]

School of Arts and Sciences


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Classroom-Medical Building 153 ~ 260-481-6160 ~ www.ipfw.edu/as/

The School of Arts and Sciences offers programs and courses in the traditional liberal arts disciplines. In addition to providing students with opportunities to develop skills required for the workplace or for advanced study, it seeks to foster well-rounded development of the individual. The school recognizes the role of nontraditional students at IPFW and makes special efforts to meet their needs.

Graduates of the school’s baccalaureate programs should have knowledge and awareness enabling them to be effective citizens and lifelong learners. They are expected to have a working understanding of the knowledge and methodology appropriate for their discipline and should be aware of the major issues in their field and able to communicate field content effectively.

The school’s Associate of Arts program with 10 concentration areas serves as an intermediate step toward completion of a baccalaureate degree. The chemical methods Associate of Science program, on the other hand, serves students who are preparing for a career as a chemical technician and is not recommended for students who wish to pursue a bachelor’s program.

The service and research missions of the school are those appropriate to a comprehensive regional university. The school is responsible for basic-skills courses in mathematics and oral and written communication, as well as the majority of the courses fulfilling school and IPFW general-education requirements. Faculty engage in research  or creative endeavor linked to their teaching as well as to IPFW’s role as the regional center for higher education. Through research, faculty maintain their qualifications as teachers and, in their contribution to knowledge in their disciplines, enhance the reputation of the campus. Through research and service, the school seeks to make itself a vital resource for business, industry, public and private education, the arts, and government in northeast Indiana.

Academic Programs

The School of Arts and Sciences offers a broad range of minors, transfer programs, and interdisciplinary certificate programs.
Each program with its sponsoring unit in the school is listed below for each degree. If you are undecided about a major within the school, you should, with the help of your advisor, choose courses carefully to assure reasonable progress as you narrow your choices and finally decide on a specific plan of study. If you change your major within the school, your degree requirements and your university affiliation may also change.

All bachelor’s degrees require a major of at least 24 credits in courses specified by the major department. Minors include (a) a minimum of 12 credits with at least 8 credits at the 200 level or above; (b) at least half the credits taken as resident credits; and (c) a grade of C or better in each course.

Associate of Arts

An Associate of Arts (A.A.) is available with a choice of 10 concentrations. You can generally apply all credits earned in the A.A. program toward a bachelor’s degree with a major in the A.A. concentration area.

  Concentration                           
 
Department
 

Biology
English
French
German
History
Mathematics
Political Science
Psychology
Spanish
Women’s Studies

 

Biology
English and Linguistics
International Language and Culture Studies
International Language and Culture Studies
History
Mathematical Sciences
Political Science
Psychology
International Language and Culture Studies
Women’s Studies

Associate of Science

  Concentration   Department
  Chemical Methods   Chemistry

Bachelor of Arts

  Major Department
 

Anthropology
Computer Science
Economics
English
French
Geology
German
History
Interpersonal and Organizational  Communication
Media and Public Communication
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Spanish
Women’s Studies

Sociology and Anthropology
Mathematical Sciences
Arts and Sciences
English and Linguistics
International Language and Culture Studies
Geosciences
International Language and Culture Studies
History
Communication
Communication
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology and Anthropology
International Language and Culture Studies
Women’s Studies

Bachelor of Science

  Major  

Department

  Biology
Biology Teaching Chemistry, B.S.
Chemistry, B.S.C.
Chemistry Teaching
Geology
Mathematics
Mathematics Teaching
Medical Technology
Physics
Physics Teaching
Speech and Hearing Therapy
  Biology
Biology
Chemistry
Chemistry
Geosciences
Mathematical Sciences
Mathematical Sciences
Biology
Physics
Physics
Audiology and Speech Sciences

Minors

  Minor     Department
  Anthropology
Applied Ethics
Biology
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Creative Writing
Economics
English
Film and Media Studies
Folklore
French
Geology
German
History
Journalism
Linguistics
Mathematics
Media Production
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Professional Writing
Psychology
Public Relations
Religious Studies
Sociology
Spanish
Women’s Studies
    Sociology and Anthropology
Philosophy
Biology
Chemistry
Communication
English and Linguistics
Arts and Sciences
English and Linguistics
Arts and Sciences
English and Linguistics
International Language and Culture Studies
Geosciences
International Language and Culture Studies
History
Arts and Sciences
English and Linguistics
Mathematical Sciences
Communication
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
English and Linguistics
Psychology
Arts and Sciences
Philosophy
Sociology and Anthropology
International Language and Culture Studies
Women’s Studies

Certificates

  Subject   Department
 

American Studies
Ethnic and Cultural Studies
Gerontology
International Studies
Native American Studies
Peace and Conflict Studies
Teaching English as a New Language
Women’s Studies

 

Arts and Sciences
Arts and Sciences
Arts and Sciences
Arts and Sciences
Arts and Sciences
Arts and Sciences
English and Linguistics
Arts and Sciences

  Research Certificates    
  Anthropology
Biology
Chemistry
Mathematical Sciences
Physics
Psychology
  Arts and Sciences
Arts and Sciences
Arts and Sciences
Arts and Sciences
Arts and Sciences
Arts and Sciences

Transfer Programs

The school’s transfer programs in agriculture, journalism, forestry and natural resources, prepharmacy, and preveterinary studies are described in Part 4 of the Bulletin. You may also complete at IPFW one or two years of work toward many bachelor’s degrees offered by the College of Arts and Sciences at Indiana University Bloomington and by the School of Liberal Arts and the School of Science at Purdue University West Lafayette. If you are planning to complete your degree at another campus, make this interest known the first time you see your IPFW academic advisor.

Preprofessional Programs

The school provides academic advising and programs for students who wish to prepare to compete for admission to professional schools at one of the public universities in the state or at other institutions. In the list below, the years refer to full-time study, 30 to 32 credits per academic year:

  Program   Years   University        
  Predentistry*
Pre-law
Premedicine*
  3–4
4
3–4
  Indiana
Indiana
Indiana
  Program   Years   University
  Pre-optometry*
Prepharmacy 2
Preveterinary Medicine
  3–4
2
2
  Indiana
Purdue
Purdue

*Although some schools offer early admission to highly qualified students who have completed 90 credits, most applicants have completed a bachelor’s degree. If you think you may qualify for early admission, you should consult your advisor about completing requirements for the bachelor’s degree from the School of Arts and Sciences during the first year of professional school.

Academic advising for prepharmacy students is provided in the school office; for predental, premedical, pre-optometry, and preveterinary students in the Department of Biology; and for prelaw students in the Department of Political Science. If you are not majoring in the department that provides this advising, you should consult the appropriate preprofessional advisor before you see your department advisor to select your courses.

The Science and Engineering Research Semester (SERS)

Students majoring in natural sciences, mathematics, or computer science are encouraged to consider participating in the Science and Engineering Research Semester sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. If you are admitted to the program, you spend a fall or spring semester at one of six national laboratories conducting research under the mentorship of a staff scientist or engineer. The laboratories include Argonne in Illinois, Brookhaven in New York, Lawrence Berkeley in California, Los Alamos in New Mexico, Oak Ridge in Tennessee, and Pacific Northwest in Washington state. In addition to being directly involved in research, you also may enroll in one academic course during this semester. Credit for research and course work is determined in consultation with your academic advisor, the department chair, and the SERS campus advisor. Students accepted into the program receive a stipend, housing, and limited travel reimbursement. Inquiries should be initiated at least seven months prior to the anticipated starting date. You should begin planning in your freshman year to reserve time for this opportunity. Eligibility requirements include U.S. citizenship or permanent resident alien  status, completion of the sophomore year, and a GPA of 3.00 or higher. For further information, contact the School of Arts and Sciences or the College of Engineering, Technology and Computer Science.

Cooperative Education (Co-Op) Program

Cooperative education provides an opportunity for you to work in an occupation related to your major. In this program, you may alternate between full-time study and full-time employment. Students normally enter the program at the end of their first year or upon completion of the summer session immediately following the first year. Check with your advisor regarding department requirements for eligibility for this program.

Research Certificate

The research certificate provides opportunities for you to engage in active learning opportunities integrating original research and the undergraduate curricula by learning research methods and tools appropriate to your discipline and your research interests within the discipline; by learning the foundations of research in the history, philosophy, and theory of the discipline; by learning advanced communications skills; and by applying these learnings by designing and executing a research study or project and communicating the results to others.

Degree Requirements and Academic Regulations for Students in the School of Arts and Sciences

In addition to the academic regulations of IPFW (see Part 7), the following rules apply to you. Where school regulations are stricter than IPFW regulations, the school regulations apply.

For each of the concentrations for the Associate of Arts, the requirements encompass approximately the first half of the bachelor’s degree program offered by the sponsoring department. See Part 4 for complete requirements for related bachelor’s degrees.

Requirements for the Associate of Arts

Credits in IPFW General Education Area I:(9)

  • COM 114 Fundamentals of Speech Communication
  • ENG W131 Elementary Composition I (or equivalent), with a grade of C or higher
  • Quantitative Reasoning course (except MA 101), with a grade of C or higher
  • Credits in IPFW General Education Area II, including one science course with a scheduled laboratory Credits: 6
  • Credits in IPFW General Education Area III Credits: 6
  • Credits in IPFW General Education Area IV Credits: 6
  • Credits in the first year of a foreign language Credits: 8
  • Credits in a concentration with a grade of C or higher in each course (see below) Credits: 15–21
  • Additional credits in approved elective courses Credits: 4–12

    Total with a graduation GPA of at least 2.00 (60–63)

Requirements for Associate of Science

Requirements for the Associate of Science in chemical methods appear in Part 4 of this Bulletin.

Requirements for Bachelor of Arts

In addition to Areas I through VI of the IPFW General Education program and the requirements for your major, you must satisfy the following school requirements:

  1. Parts A through D listed below
  2. At least 30 credits in upper-level courses as defined by the departments offering the courses (excluding military science courses).
  3. A grade of C or better for all courses counted in the major. At most, one approved course in the major discipline may also count toward IPFW General Education Area II–V requirements. No course in the major discipline may count in Area VI.
  4. The IPFW General Education Area I computer literacy requirement for the School of Arts and Sciences is met by completing COM 114, ENG W131, and one additional course selected from the following: CS 106, CS 107, CS 160, MA 149, MA 151, MA 153, MA 154, MA 163, MA 164, MA 165, MA 166, MA 168, MA 229, MA 230, STAT 125, or an approved departmentally specified course, or completion of STEPS (or successor program).
  5. A sufficient number of elective credits to bring the total for graduation to 124.

Part A: English Writing

You must complete ENG W233 or an equivalent second writing course approved for this purpose by the school. Approved equivalents are ENG L202, FREN W300, GER W300, HIST H217, POLS Y205, SOC S260, and SPAN W300. You must complete both ENG W131 (or equivalent) and your second writing course with a grade of C or better.

Part B: Foreign Language

You must complete the last two courses in one of the sequences listed below (or demonstrate equivalent proficiency). Courses are offered in French, German, and Spanish.You are urged to begin studying a language as soon as possible. For advanced placement and special credit in foreign language, see the additional information for the bachelor’s degree.

  • FREN F111–F112–F203–F204
  • GER G111–G112–G203–G204
  • SPAN S111–S112–S203–S204

Part C: Distribution

In addition to the courses used to satisfy part A and B above, you must complete 3 credits in each of the following areas. No credits in your major discipline or in directed study courses may be used to satisfy this requirement.

1. Science and Mathematics. You must complete at least one science course with a scheduled laboratory, and you must also complete with a grade of C or better one mathematics course at the MA 153 level or above, or any other course in the Quantitative Reasoning section of the IPFW General Education requirements except MA 101. If the science and mathematics courses you completed for the IPFW General Education requirements satisfy this requirement, you may select the remaining required course from any of the following disciplines:

Agriculture (FNR 103 only)
Anthropology (ANTH B200 only)
Astronomy
Biology (excluding BIOL 105)
Chemistry
Entomology
Geography (physical geography only)
Geology
Mathematics (excluding MA 101, 102, and 103)
Physics
Political Science (POLS Y395 only)
Sociology (SOC S351 only)
Statistics

2. Social and Behavioral Sciences. Courses from the following disciplines satisfy this requirement:

Anthropology (excluding ANTH B200)
Audiology and Speech Sciences
Communication (excluding COM 114, 210, 240, 312, and 316)
Economics
English (ENG G205, G206, and G301 only)
Geography (human, cultural, or social geography only)
Gerontology (GERN G231 only)
International Studies (lNTL I200 only)
Journalism (JOUR C200, C300, and J300 only)
Linguistics
Political Science (excluding POLS Y395)
Psychology
Sociology (excluding SOC S351)
Spanish* (SPAN S425, S426, and S428 only)
Women’s studies (WOST W210 and W240 only)

3. Humanities. Courses from the following disciplines satisfy this requirement:

Afro-American studies
American studies
Architectural Engineering Technology (ARET 210 and 310 only)
Chinese*
Classical studies
Communication (COM 210, 216, 240, 312, and 316 only)
Comparative literature
English (except ENG G205, G206, G301, P131, W130, W131,
W135, W140, W232, W233, W234, W321, W331, W398,
and W421)
Film studies
Fine arts (excluding studio courses)
Folklore
French*
German*
History
Journalism (excluding JOUR C200, C300, and J300)
Latin American studies
Music (excluding performance/skills courses)
Philosophy
Religion
Russian*
Spanish* (except SPAN S425, S426, and S428)
Theatre (excluding performance/production courses)
Women’s studies (excluding WOST W210 and W240)

*excluding courses used to satisfy the Part B requirement

Part D: Cultural Studies

You must complete two approved courses. Courses used to meet the IPFW General Education requirements or the requirements of Part C may also be used to fulfill Part D requirements; however, the credits for those courses count only once toward graduation.

1. Western Tradition. You must complete one of the following 3-credit courses dealing broadly with the Western tradition:

CLAS C205, C405
COM 312
ENG L101, L102
FINA H111, H112
HIST H113, H114
PHIL 110, 112, 240, 301, 331
POLS Y105, Y381, Y382

2. Non-Western Culture. You must complete one of the following 3-credit courses dealing exclusively or primarily with a non-Western culture or cultures:

ANTH E320, E321, E330, E335, E340, E341, E345, E401, E405, E420, E445, E455, E462, E470, P360, P370
CMLT C461
ENG L107, L113, L364, L387
FINA H415
FOLK F305, F352
HIST A310–A311, C393, D410, E331, E332, E431, F341, F342, F346, F432, G451, G452, H201, H202, H203, H204, H232, T335
PHIL 330
POLS Y339, Y340
REL 301
SPAN S246, S412, S471, S472, S477, S479, S480
WOST W301

Requirements for Bachelor of Science

In addition to Areas I through VI of the IPFW General Education program and the requirements for your major, you must satisfy the following school requirements:

  1. Parts A and B listed below
  2. At least 30 credits in upper-level courses as defined by the departments offering the courses (excluding military science courses)
  3. A GPA of 2.00 or higher for all courses in the major department. At most, one approved course in the major discipline may also count toward satisfying IPFW General Education Area II–V requirements.
  4. The IPFW General Education Area I computer literacy requirement for the School of Arts and Sciences is met by completing COM 114, ENG W131, and one additional course selected from the following: CS 106, CS 160, MA 149, MA 151, MA 153, MA 154, MA 163, MA 164, MA 165, MA 166, MA 168, MA 229, MA 230, STAT 125, or an approved departmentally specified course, or completion of STEPS (or successor program).
  5. A sufficient number of elective credits to bring the total for graduation to 124.

Part A: English Writing

You must complete ENG W233 or an equivalent second writing course approved for this purpose by the School of Arts and Sciences. Approved equivalents are ENG L202,
FREN W300, GER W300, HIST H217, POLS Y205, SOC S260, or SPAN W300. You must complete both ENG W131 (or equivalent) and your second writing course with a grade of C or better.

Part B: Foreign Language

You must complete two courses at the first-year level (or demonstrate equivalent proficiency) in one language. Students in a teaching program are exempt from the foreign-language requirement. You are urged to begin studying a language as soon as possible. For advanced placement and special credit in foreign language, see the additional information for bachelor’s degrees, below.

Additional Information for Bachelor’s Degrees

Along with the IPFW academic regulations (see part 7), the following information applies to all bachelor’s degree programs:

1. Special Credit for Foreign Language.

When you begin your foreign language study at the second-semester (113) level or higher, you are eligible to apply for special credit after you successfully complete the course into which you placed. You may receive up to 14 credits of special credit for the courses you skipped.

2. Undistributed Transfer Credit.

Undistributed transfer credit (for courses not equivalent to IPFW courses) may be used to satisfy General Education requirements, distribution requirements, and may be counted in the major. You should contact the school office to confirm the application to your program of any undistributed transfer credit you are awarded.

3. Credit Restrictions.

The following restrictions apply to all Arts and Sciences degrees:

  1. You may count no more than 4 credits in:
    HPER activities
  2. You may count no more than 3 credits in:
    IDIS courses ENG W135 MA 149, and only by those departments that allow graduation credit for MA 153
  3. You may count no credit in:
    Developmental courses such as CHM 100; EDUC X15x; ENG R15x, W11x, and W130; and MA 109, 111, and 113.

    Courses that provide only surveys of career opportunities, such as AGR 101, CNT 101, EDUA F300 (except when offered as Invitation to Teaching) and G250, EDUC X210, ENGR 101, HSRV 100 (1 cr.), HTM 100, IDIS 105, MHT 100 (1 cr.), NUR 101, RHIT 100, SPEA V352, and VM 102.

    Courses designed to provide a skill not required to complete the major, such as AHLT Mxxx, AHSP Mxxx; BUFW C124, C125, C293, and X221; BUS K214; DAST Axxx; DHYG Hxxx; OLS 121; and SPV 379 and 399.

    Courses offered by the former Indiana Division of General and Technical Studies (DGTS).

4. Credit for Military Service.

Credit for military service in the armed forces of the United States will not be counted toward graduation.

5. Overlapping Content.

You may not count toward graduation any courses or sequences considered to have overlapping content. Such courses are listed below; check this list before registering. This list may not be exhaustive. Please consult with your advisor. If you enroll in a course that appears in the left column, and you have completed any of the courses that are listed to its right, only the most recently completed course will apply toward graduation.

Courses with Overlapping Content

AHSP M195
BIOL 100
BIOL 105
BIOL 108-109
BIOL 117-119
BIOL 121/122–133/134
BIOL 203–204
BIOL 215–216
BIOL 218
BIOL 220
BIOL 221
BIOL 233–234
BIOL 241–242
BIOL 250
BIOL 317
BIOL 381–382
BIOL 437
BIOL 438-439
BUS K200–K211–K212
CHM 101–102
CHM 104
CHM 111–112
CHM 115–116
CHM 129
CHM 151
CHM 224
CHM 251
CHM 252
CHM 254–258
CHM 255–256
CHM 261–262
CHM 263–264
CHM 265–266
CHM 321
CHM 371
CHM 383–384
COM 250
COM 352
CS 106
ECON E200
ECON E201
ECON E270
EE 302
ENG L220
ENG L315
ENG L374
ENG L379
ENG W131
ENG W135
ENG W140
ENG W233
FOLK F254
GEOL G100
GEOL G103
GEOL S100
HIST A316
HIST A345-A346
HIST E331
HIST E332
IDIS 110
IDIS G102
IDIS G103
IDIS G104
JOUR C200
JOUR J300
MA 149
MA 150
MA 151
MA 153
MA 153–154
MA 159
MA 163–164
MA 165–166
MA 175
MA 213
MA 213–215
MA 227–228
MA 229–230
MA 261
MA 262
MA 263
MA 321
MA 363
MUS Z201
PHYS 131–132
PHYS 152–251
PHYS 201–202
PHYS 218–219
PHYS 220–221
PHYS 241
PHYS 251
PHYS 261
POLS Y395
PSY 200
PSY 201
PSY 235
PSY 317
PSY 369
PSY 416
SOC S351
SPEA K300
STAT 240
STAT 260
STAT 301
STAT 303
STAT 307
STAT 311
STAT 340
STAT 511
STAT 512
STAT 516
WOST W200
WOST W210

 

BIOL 105
BIOL 108–109 or 117–119 or 121/122–133/134 or 250
AHSP M195
BIOL 100 or 117–119 or 121/122–133/134 or 250
BIOL 100 or 108–109 or 121/122–133/134 or 250
BIOL 100 or 108–109 or 117–119 or 250
BIOL 215–216
BIOL 203–204
BIOL 241–242
BIOL 221 or 438–439 or 437
BIOL 220 or 438–439 or 437
BIOL 381–382
BIOL 218
BIOL 100 or 108/109 or 117–119 or 121/122–133/134
PSY 317
BIOL 233–234
BIOL 220 or 221 or 438-439
BIOL 220 or 221 or 437
CS 106
CHM 104 or 111–112 or 115–116 or 129 or 151
CHM 101–102 or 111–112 or 115–116 or 129 or 151
CHM 104 or 101–102 or 115–116 or 129 or 151
CHM 104 or 101–102 or 111–112 or 129 or 151
CHM 104 or 101–102 or 111–112 or 115-116 or 151
CHM 104 or 101–102 or 111–112 or 115-116 or 129
CHM 321
CHM 255–256 or 261–262
CHM 254–258 or 263–264 or 265–266
CHM 252 or 263–264 or 265–266
CHM 251 or 261–262
CHM 251 or 255–256
CHM 252 or 254–258 or 265–266
CHM 252 or 254–258 or 263–264
CHM 224
CHM 373–374 or 383–384
CHM 371 or 373–374
JOUR C200
JOUR J300
BUS K200–K211–K212
ECON E201
ECON E200
POLS Y395 or PSY 201 or SOC S351 or SPEA K300 or STAT 240 or 260 or 301 or 303 or 307 or 511
STAT 311 or 516
ENG L315
ENG L220
ENG L379
ENG L374
ENG W135
ENG W131
ENG W233
ENG W140
MUS Z201
GEOL G103 or S100
GEOL G100 or S100
GEOL G100 or G103
HIST A345–A346
HIST A316
HIST E431
HIST E432
IDIS G102 or G103 or G104
IDIS 110 or G103 or G104
IDIS 110 or G102 or G104
IDIS 110 or G102 or G103
COM 250
COM 352
MA 153
MA 151 or 153–154 or 159
MA 150 or 153–154 or 159
MA 149
MA 150 or 151 or 159
MA 150 or 151 or 153–154
MA 165–166 or 227–228 or 229–230
MA 163–164 or 227–228 or 229–230
MA 213–215
MA 175 or 215
MA 175
MA 163–164 or 165–166 or 229–230
MA 163–164 or 165–166 or 227–228
MA 263
MA 321 or 363
MA 261
MA 262 or 363
MA 262 or 321
FOLK F254
PHYS 152–251 or 201–202 or 218–219 or 220–221
PHYS 131–132 or 201–202 or 218–219 or 220–221
PHYS 131–132 or 152–251 or 218–219 or 220–221
PHYS 131–132 or 152–251 or 201–202 or 220–221
PHYS 131–132 or 152–251 or 201–202 or 218–219
PHYS 251 or 261
PHYS 241 or 261
PHYS 241 or 251
ECON E270 or PSY 201 or SOC S351 or SPEA K300 or STAT 240 or 260 or 301 or 303 or 307 or 511
PSY 416
ECON E270 or POLS Y395 or SOC S351 or SPEA K300 or STAT 240 or 260 or 301 or 303 or 307 or 511
PSY 369
BIOL 317
PSY 235
PSY 200
ECON E270 or POLS Y395 or PSY 201 or SPEA K300 or STAT 240 or 260 or 301 or 303 or 307 or 511
ECON E270 or POLS Y395 or PSY 201 or SOC S351 or STAT 240 or 260 or 301 or 303 or 307 or 511
ECON E270 or POLS Y395 or PSY 201 or SOC S351 or SPEA K300 or STAT 260 or 301 or 303 or 307 or 511
ECON E270 or POLS Y395 or PSY 201 or SOC S351 or SPEA K300 or STAT 240 or 301 or 303 or 307 or 511
ECON E270 or POLS Y395 or PSY 201 or SOC S351 or SPEA K300 or STAT 240 or 260 or 303 or 307 or 511
ECON E270 or POLS Y395 or PSY 201 or SOC S351 or SPEA K300 or STAT 240 or 260 or 301 or 307 or 511
ECON E270 or POLS Y395 or PSY 201 or SOC S351 or SPEA K300 or STAT 240 or 260 or 301 or 303 or 511
EE 302 or STAT 516
STAT 512
ECON E270 or POLS Y395 or PSY 201 or SOC S351 or SPEA K300 or STAT 240 or 260 or 301 or 303 or 307
STAT 340
EE 302 or STAT 311
WOST W210
WOST W200

 

Upper-Level Courses

All courses numbered 300 or above are considered upper-level courses. In addition, the following 200-numbered courses, defined as upper level by the departments offering them, may be included in the 30 credits in upper-level courses required for graduation.

BIOL 215
CHM 218, 224, 254, 255, 256, 258, 261, 262, 265, 266, 275,
and 290
ENTM 206-207
GEOL G213, G221, and G222
MA 261, 263, and 275
PHYS 270
PSY 201, 202, and 203, 272

Correspondence Study

Departments may approve enrollment in correspondence-study courses by students pursuing their majors. After you obtain a signature indicating departmental approval, you must bring the enrollment form to the School of Arts and Sciences for authorization to enroll.

Academic Load

You may register for more than 18 credits per semester or 7 credits in a six-week summer session only if: (1) your most recent semester GPA is 3.00 or higher, (2) you have no incomplete grades at the time of registration, and (3) you obtain approval of a dean of the school.

Pass/Not-Pass Option

The following restrictions are in addition to those in the IPFW academic regulations in Part 7 of this Bulletin:

  1. You must be classified as a sophomore or higher and must have a GPA of 2.50 or better.
  2. You may take no more than two courses per year under the Pass/Not-Pass Option. Summer-session enrollments are counted aspart of the preceding academic year for the purpose of this restriction.

Academic Renewal Option

The School of Arts and Sciences participates in the Academic Renewal option for eligible students returning to IPFW after an absence of five or more years. See your advisor for additional details.

Changing Major Within the School

If you change your major within the school, your school requirements will be those specified in the Bulletin in effect at the time the change becomes effective.

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